Inception?: Technology to invade people’s dreams not far away!

Inception?: Technology to invade people’s dreams not far away!

As sci-fi thriller “Inception” topped box offices across the world, audiences were delighted and appalled by its futuristic story of a criminal gang invading people’s dreams to steal valuable data.

More than a decade on, the technology envisioned by filmmaker Christopher Nolan is likely not far off, according to experts in Chile, who have moved the security debate beyond burglar alarms to safeguarding the most valuable real estate people ever own: their minds.

The South American nation is aiming to be the world’s first to legally protect citizens’ “neuro-rights,” with lawmakers expected to pass a constitutional reform blocking technology that seeks to “increase, diminish or disturb” people’s mental integrity without their consent.

Opposition senator Guido Girardi, one of the authors of the legislation, is worried about technology — whether algorithms, bionic implants or some other gadgetry — that could threaten “the essence of humans, their autonomy, their freedom and their free will.”

“If this technology manages to read (your mind), before even you’re aware of what you’re thinking,” he told AFP, “it could write emotions into your brain: life stories that aren’t yours and that your brain won’t be able to distinguish whether they were yours or the product of designers.”

‘Prevent manipulation’

Scores of sci-fi movies and novels have offered audiences the dark side of neurotechnology — perhaps invoking criminal masterminds ensconced in secret strongholds, manipulating the world with a dastardly laugh while stroking a cat.

In fact, the nascent technology has already demonstrated how it can have significantly positive applications.

In 2013, then-US president Barack Obama promoted the BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neuro-technologies) initiative, which aimed to study the causes of brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and epilepsy.

Back in Chile, Science Minister Andres Couve told AFP the neuro-rights debate “is part of a consolidation of a new scientific institutionality in the country that is now capturing international attention.”

But many are worried about the potential for nefarious actors to abuse technological advances.

Chile’s President Sebastian Pinera proposed at last week’s Ibero-American summit in Andorra that countries legislate together on the thorny issue.

“I call on all Ibero-American countries to anticipate the future and to adequately protect, now, not just our citizens’ data and information, but also their thoughts, their feelings, their neuronal information, to prevent these from being manipulated by new technologies,” the conservative Pinera said.

The Chilean bill contains four main fields of legislation: guarding the human mind’s data, or neuro-data; fixing limits to the neuro-technology of reading and especially writing in brains; setting an equitable distribution and access to these technologies; and putting limits on neuro-algorithms.

Spanish scientist Rafael Yuste, an expert on the subject from Columbia University in New York, told AFP some of these technologies already exist, and even the most remote will be available within 10 years.

‘A new Renaissance’

They are already being applied to animals in laboratories.

Scientists have experimented with rats, implanting images of unfamiliar objects in their brains and observing how they accept those objects in real life as their own and incorporate them into their natural behavior.

“If you can enter there (into the chemical processes of the brain) and stimulate or inhibit them, you can change people’s decisions. This is something we’ve already done with animals,” said Yuste.

The science has opened the possibility of designing hybrid humans with artificially enhanced cognitive abilities.

The risk is that, without proper safeguards, the technology might be used to alter people’s thoughts, employing algorithms via the internet to re-program their hard wiring, to dictate their interests, preferences or patterns of consumption.

“To avoid a two-speed situation with some enhanced humans and others who aren’t, we believe these neuro-technologies need to be regulated along principles of universal justice, recognizing the spirit of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,” said Yuste.

Yuste considers neuro-technology a “tsunami” that humanity will have to deal with, which is why people need to be prepared.

“Neuro-technology can be scary if you think about dystopian science-fiction scenarios. However, for every dystopian scenario, there are 10 beneficial ones,” said Yuste, who sees neuro-technology as “a new Renaissance for humanity.”

Already, neuro-technologies are used on patients suffering from Parkinson’s or depression by stimulating the brain with electrodes to “alleviate the symptoms,” said Yuste.

Similarly, deaf people are treated with “cochlear implants in the auditory nerve” that stimulate the brain.It is hoped that something similar in the future will restore sight to the blind or treat those with Alzheimer’s by strengthening the memory’s neuronal circuits.“It will be a beneficial change for the human race,” said Yuste. comments

Read more at arynews.tv

Radiation Exposure may Help Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

Radiation Exposure may Help Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

Innovative new treatment that aims to deliver low doses of radiation is shown to render remarkable improvements in behaviour and cognition of individuals living with severe Alzheimer’s disease, within days of receiving it as per a Baycrest-Sunnybrook pilot study at the Baycrest Centre For Geriatric Care, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to gradual memory loss and behavioral changes. It is characterized by the formation of beta-amyloid plaques and the tau proteins in the brain tissues, years before the actual symptoms occur.

“The primary goal of a therapy for Alzheimer’s disease should be to improve the patient’s quality of life. We want to optimize their well-being and restore communication with family and friends to avoid social isolation, loneliness and under-stimulation. Although the study was a small pilot and should be interpreted with caution, our results suggest that low-dose radiation therapy may successfully achieve this,” says Dr. Morris Freedman, a scientist at Baycrest’s Rotman Research Institute, head of the division of neurology at Baycrest and senior author of the study.

‘Innovative new treatment with low doses of radiation shows remarkable improvements in behavior and cognition of individuals living with severe Alzheimer’s disease, within days of receiving it. This offers hope for those with severe Alzheimer’s disease and their loved ones.’

A clinical follow-up to a 2015 case report about a patient in hospice with Alzheimer’s disease served as a base for the study. Mulitple treatments with radiation to her brain showed significant improvements in cognition, speech, movement, and appetite. Following this, she was discharged from the hospice to a long-term care home for older adults.

Low Dose Radiation in Alzheimer’s Disease

Many ill effects are reported to occur on our health with high doses of radiation. But, low doses, such as those used for diagnostic CT scans, may help the body protect and repair itself.

“Numerous neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, are thought to be caused in part by oxidative stress that damages all cells, including those in the brain. We have natural protection systems to combat the damage, but they become less effective as we get older. Each dose of radiation stimulates our natural protection systems to work harder – to produce more antioxidants that prevent oxidative damage, to repair more DNA damage and to destroy more mutated cells,” says Dr. Jerry Cuttler, a retired Atomic Energy of Canada scientist and the lead author of the study.

The study tested four individuals living with severe Alzheimer’s disease, who were given three treatments of low-dose radiation, each spaced two weeks apart. A CT scanner at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre was employed to provide the supervised treatments.

Standardized tests and observation were utilized by the study team to record changes in the patients’ communication and behaviour after the treatment. Most importantly, they collected information (descriptions, photos and videos) from the patients’ spouses, children and caregivers.

It was seen that three of the four individuals showed remarkable improvements within one day of the first treatment, with their relatives reporting increased alertness and responsiveness, recognition of loved ones, mobility, social engagement, mood, and more.

The study thereby offers hope for those with severe Alzheimer’s disease and their loved ones. However, certain limitations like the small size of the study, missing a placebo group requires larger clinical trials in future research to examine the effects of this novel therapy.

Source: Medindia

Read more at www.medindia.net

Advances in brain tech prompt push for ‘neuro-rights’

Advances in brain tech prompt push for 'neuro-rights'

File picture: Pexels Santiago – As sci-fi thriller “Inception” topped box offices across the world, audiences were delighted and appalled by its futuristic story of a criminal gang invading people’s dreams to steal valuable data.

More than a decade on, the technology envisioned by filmmaker Christopher Nolan is likely not far off, according to experts in Chile, who have moved the security debate beyond burglar alarms to safeguarding the most valuable real estate people ever own: their minds.

The South American nation is aiming to be the world’s first to legally protect citizens’ “neuro-rights,” with lawmakers expected to pass a constitutional reform blocking technology that seeks to “increase, diminish or disturb” people’s mental integrity without their consent.

Opposition senator Guido Girardi, one of the authors of the legislation, is worried about technology — whether algorithms, bionic implants or some other gadgetry — that could threaten “the essence of humans, their autonomy, their freedom and their free will.”

“If this technology manages to read (your mind), before even you’re aware of what you’re thinking,” he told AFP, “it could write emotions into your brain: life stories that aren’t yours and that your brain won’t be able to distinguish whether they were yours or the product of designers.”

– ‘Prevent manipulation’ –

Scores of sci-fi movies and novels have offered audiences the dark side of neurotechnology — perhaps invoking criminal masterminds ensconced in secret strongholds, manipulating the world with a dastardly laugh while stroking a cat.

In fact, the nascent technology has already demonstrated how it can have significantly positive applications.

In 2013, then-US president Barack Obama promoted the BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neuro-technologies) initiative, which aimed to study the causes of brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and epilepsy.

Back in Chile, Science Minister Andres Couve told AFP the neuro-rights debate “is part of a consolidation of a new scientific institutionality in the country that is now capturing international attention.”

But many are worried about the potential for nefarious actors to abuse technological advances.

Chile’s President Sebastian Pinera proposed at last week’s Ibero-American summit in Andorra that countries legislate together on the thorny issue.

“I call on all Ibero-American countries to anticipate the future and to adequately protect, now, not just our citizens’ data and information, but also their thoughts, their feelings, their neuronal information, to prevent these from being manipulated by new technologies,” the conservative Pinera said.

The Chilean bill contains four main fields of legislation: guarding the human mind’s data, or neuro-data; fixing limits to the neuro-technology of reading and especially writing in brains; setting an equitable distribution and access to these technologies; and putting limits on neuro-algorithms.

Spanish scientist Rafael Yuste, an expert on the subject from Columbia University in New York, told AFP some of these technologies already exist, and even the most remote will be available within 10 years.

– ‘A new Renaissance’ –

They are already being applied to animals in laboratories.

Scientists have experimented with rats, implanting images of unfamiliar objects in their brains and observing how they accept those objects in real life as their own and incorporate them into their natural behavior.

“If you can enter there (into the chemical processes of the brain) and stimulate or inhibit them, you can change people’s decisions. This is something we’ve already done with animals,” said Yuste.

The science has opened the possibility of designing hybrid humans with artificially enhanced cognitive abilities.

The risk is that, without proper safeguards, the technology might be used to alter people’s thoughts, employing algorithms via the internet to re-program their hard wiring, to dictate their interests, preferences or patterns of consumption.

“To avoid a two-speed situation with some enhanced humans and others who aren’t, we believe these neuro-technologies need to be regulated along principles of universal justice, recognizing the spirit of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,” said Yuste.

Yuste considers neuro-technology a “tsunami” that humanity will have to deal with, which is why people need to be prepared.

“Neuro-technology can be scary if you think about dystopian science-fiction scenarios. However, for every dystopian scenario, there are 10 beneficial ones,” said Yuste, who sees neuro-technology as “a new Renaissance for humanity.”

Already, neuro-technologies are used on patients suffering from Parkinson’s or depression by stimulating the brain with electrodes to “alleviate the symptoms,” said Yuste.

Similarly, deaf people are treated with “cochlear implants in the auditory nerve” that stimulate the brain.It is hoped that something similar in the future will restore sight to the blind or treat those with Alzheimer’s by strengthening the memory’s neuronal circuits.”It will be a beneficial change for the human race,” said Yuste.

Read more at www.iol.co.za

Mindblowing: Advances In Brain Tech Spur Push For ‘Neuro-rights’

As sci-fi thriller “Inception” topped box offices across the world, audiences were delighted and appalled by its futuristic story of a criminal gang invading people’s dreams to steal valuable data.

More than a decade on, the technology envisioned by filmmaker Christopher Nolan is likely not far off, according to experts in Chile, who have moved the security debate beyond burglar alarms to safeguarding the most valuable real estate people ever own: their minds.

The South American nation is aiming to be the world’s first to legally protect citizens’ “neuro-rights,” with lawmakers expected to pass a constitutional reform blocking technology that seeks to “increase, diminish or disturb” people’s mental integrity without their consent.

Opposition senator Guido Girardi, one of the authors of the legislation, is worried about technology — whether algorithms, bionic implants or some other gadgetry — that could threaten “the essence of humans, their autonomy, their freedom and their free will.”

“If this technology manages to read (your mind), before even you’re aware of what you’re thinking,” he told AFP, “it could write emotions into your brain: life stories that aren’t yours and that your brain won’t be able to distinguish whether they were yours or the product of designers.”

Scores of sci-fi movies and novels have offered audiences the dark side of neurotechnology — perhaps invoking criminal masterminds ensconced in secret strongholds, manipulating the world with a dastardly laugh while stroking a cat.

In fact, the nascent technology has already demonstrated how it can have significantly positive applications.

In 2013, then-US president Barack Obama promoted the BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neuro-technologies) initiative, which aimed to study the causes of brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and epilepsy.

Back in Chile, Science Minister Andres Couve told AFP the neuro-rights debate “is part of a consolidation of a new scientific institutionality in the country that is now capturing international attention.”

But many are worried about the potential for nefarious actors to abuse technological advances.

Chile’s President Sebastian Pinera proposed at last week’s Ibero-American summit in Andorra that countries legislate together on the thorny issue.

“I call on all Ibero-American countries to anticipate the future and to adequately protect, now, not just our citizens’ data and information, but also their thoughts, their feelings, their neuronal information, to prevent these from being manipulated by new technologies,” the conservative Pinera said.

The Chilean bill contains four main fields of legislation: guarding the human mind’s data, or neuro-data; fixing limits to the neuro-technology of reading and especially writing in brains; setting an equitable distribution and access to these technologies; and putting limits on neuro-algorithms. Spanish scientist Rafael Yuste, an expert on the subject from Columbia University in New York, told AFP some of these technologies already exist, and even the most remote will be available within 10 years.

They are already being applied to animals in laboratories.

Scientists have experimented with rats, implanting images of unfamiliar objects in their brains and observing how they accept those objects in real life as their own and incorporate them into their natural behavior.

“If you can enter there (into the chemical processes of the brain) and stimulate or inhibit them, you can change people’s decisions. This is something we’ve already done with animals,” said Yuste.

The science has opened the possibility of designing hybrid humans with artificially enhanced cognitive abilities.

The risk is that, without proper safeguards, the technology might be used to alter people’s thoughts, employing algorithms via the internet to re-program their hard wiring, to dictate their interests, preferences or patterns of consumption.

“To avoid a two-speed situation with some enhanced humans and others who aren’t, we believe these neuro-technologies need to be regulated along principles of universal justice, recognizing the spirit of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,” said Yuste.

Yuste considers neuro-technology a “tsunami” that humanity will have to deal with, which is why people need to be prepared.

“Neuro-technology can be scary if you think about dystopian science-fiction scenarios. However, for every dystopian scenario, there are 10 beneficial ones,” said Yuste, who sees neuro-technology as “a new Renaissance for humanity.”

Already, neuro-technologies are used on patients suffering from Parkinson’s or depression by stimulating the brain with electrodes to “alleviate the symptoms,” said Yuste.

Similarly, deaf people are treated with “cochlear implants in the auditory nerve” that stimulate the brain.

It is hoped that something similar in the future will restore sight to the blind or treat those with Alzheimer’s by strengthening the memory’s neuronal circuits.

“It will be a beneficial change for the human race,” said Yuste.

Read more at www.ibtimes.com

Advances in brain tech spur push for ‘neuro-rights’

Advances in brain tech spur push for 'neuro-rights'

As sci-fi thriller “Inception” topped box offices across the world, audiences were delighted and appalled by its futuristic story of a criminal gang invading people’s dreams to steal valuable data.

More than a decade on, the technology envisioned by filmmaker Christopher Nolan is likely not far off, according to experts in Chile, who have moved the security debate beyond burglar alarms to safeguarding the most valuable real estate people ever own: their minds.

The South American nation is aiming to be the world’s first to legally protect citizens’ “neuro-rights,” with lawmakers expected to pass a constitutional reform blocking technology that seeks to “increase, diminish or disturb” people’s mental integrity without their consent.

Opposition senator Guido Girardi, one of the authors of the legislation, is worried about technology — whether algorithms, bionic implants or some other gadgetry — that could threaten “the essence of humans, their autonomy, their freedom and their free will.”

“If this technology manages to read (your mind), before even you’re aware of what you’re thinking,” he told AFP, “it could write emotions into your brain: life stories that aren’t yours and that your brain won’t be able to distinguish whether they were yours or the product of designers.” ‘Prevent manipulation’

Scores of sci-fi movies and novels have offered audiences the dark side of neurotechnology — perhaps invoking criminal masterminds ensconced in secret strongholds, manipulating the world with a dastardly laugh while stroking a cat.

In fact, the nascent technology has already demonstrated how it can have significantly positive applications.

In 2013, then-US president Barack Obama promoted the BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neuro-technologies) initiative, which aimed to study the causes of brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and epilepsy.

Back in Chile, Science Minister Andres Couve told AFP the neuro-rights debate “is part of a consolidation of a new scientific institutionality in the country that is now capturing international attention.”

But many are worried about the potential for nefarious actors to abuse technological advances.

Chile’s President Sebastian Pinera proposed at last week’s Ibero-American summit in Andorra that countries legislate together on the thorny issue.

“I call on all Ibero-American countries to anticipate the future and to adequately protect, now, not just our citizens’ data and information, but also their thoughts, their feelings, their neuronal information, to prevent these from being manipulated by new technologies,” the conservative Pinera said.

The Chilean bill contains four main fields of legislation: guarding the human mind’s data, or neuro-data; fixing limits to the neuro-technology of reading and especially writing in brains; setting an equitable distribution and access to these technologies; and putting limits on neuro-algorithms.

Spanish scientist Rafael Yuste, an expert on the subject from Columbia University in New York, told AFP some of these technologies already exist, and even the most remote will be available within 10 years. ‘A new Renaissance’

They are already being applied to animals in laboratories.

Scientists have experimented with rats, implanting images of unfamiliar objects in their brains and observing how they accept those objects in real life as their own and incorporate them into their natural behavior.

“If you can enter there (into the chemical processes of the brain) and stimulate or inhibit them, you can change people’s decisions. This is something we’ve already done with animals,” said Yuste.

The science has opened the possibility of designing hybrid humans with artificially enhanced cognitive abilities.

The risk is that, without proper safeguards, the technology might be used to alter people’s thoughts, employing algorithms via the internet to re-program their hard wiring, to dictate their interests, preferences or patterns of consumption.

“To avoid a two-speed situation with some enhanced humans and others who aren’t, we believe these neuro-technologies need to be regulated along principles of universal justice, recognizing the spirit of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,” said Yuste.

Yuste considers neuro-technology a “tsunami” that humanity will have to deal with, which is why people need to be prepared.

“Neuro-technology can be scary if you think about dystopian science-fiction scenarios. However, for every dystopian scenario, there are 10 beneficial ones,” said Yuste, who sees neuro-technology as “a new Renaissance for humanity.”

Already, neuro-technologies are used on patients suffering from Parkinson’s or depression by stimulating the brain with electrodes to “alleviate the symptoms,” said Yuste.

Similarly, deaf people are treated with “cochlear implants in the auditory nerve” that stimulate the brain.

It is hoped that something similar in the future will restore sight to the blind or treat those with Alzheimer’s by strengthening the memory’s neuronal circuits.

“It will be a beneficial change for the human race,” said Yuste.

Read more at www.msn.com

Post-COVID, many patients try smell therapy. But does it work?

Post-COVID, many patients try smell therapy. But does it work?

n a recent episode of the popular New York Times podcast The Daily, restaurant critic Tejal Rao described her experience losing her sense of smell after having Covid-19. “Any kind of meat made me feel a little bit queasy,” she said, noting the close connection between smell and taste. For Rao, popcorn felt “like foam, but with sharp bits in it.” Like many others who have lost their sense of smell to the disease, Rao set off on a journey to recover her ability to detect scent, ultimately landing on an approach known as smell therapy. In Rao’s case, it entailed repeatedly sniffing from jars of four spices — cardamom, cloves, cinnamon, and cumin. When it comes to treating olfactory dysfunction, according to the podcast notes , smell therapy is “the only therapy proven to work.”

The episode is part of a growing landscape of press coverage reporting on a very real problem: Approximately 5 percent of the global population lives with a significantly reduced ability to smell, and an estimated 13.3 million Americans report living with some type of smell dysfunction. These numbers are growing as a small percentage of otherwise recovered Covid-19 patients report ongoing loss of smell. In response, some researchers are revisiting the concept of physical therapy for the nose in order to help restore what Covid-19 and other ailments have taken away. The only problem: nasal physiology is incredibly difficult to study, and the experimental therapy — while helpful to some — doesn’t provide the kind of evidence doctors normally need to adopt a new treatment widely.

“Smell training is somewhat questionable, frankly,” says Richard Doty, director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Smell and Taste Center. While the therapy has “caught the imagination of laypeople as well as scientists,” he says, the evidence is “pretty weak that it has any effect.” Doty, a physician who has published widely on olfactory dysfunction, suggests that smell training “doesn’t work if you compare to spontaneous resolution” of smell in the absence of training. In other words, any improvements may have occurred naturally over time. And other researchers note that it isn’t yet clear which, if any, patients might benefit from the intervention.

People with smell loss — or anosmia — are twice as likely to experience a smell-related hazardous event when compared to those with a normal sense of smell, according to a 2014 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Otolaryngology. And smell is not only a survival tool that helps detect fire and spoiled food, it also influences quality of life. Despite this, most people didn’t care much about olfaction prior to the pandemic, says Shima Moein, a neuroscientist at the Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences in Tehran, Iran. “Covid started to show people that it really matters,” she says.

Of course, people did experience long-term smell loss from a variety of causes prior to the current pandemic: other viral infections, nasal polyps that obstruct odors from reaching smell receptors, neurodegenerative diseases, physical injury to the brain or face — all can wreak havoc on the olfactory system. Aside from a controversial steroid nasal spray , this leaves people just one treatment option with any supporting studies: smell training.

Thomas Hummel, an ear, nose, and throat doctor and a researcher at the Smell and Taste Clinic in Dresden, Germany, was the first person to test the intervention on patients in a clinic. Based on what was already known about perfumers and sommeliers, who undergo rigorous training to hone their craft, Hummel hypothesized that regular exposure to discrete scents could help patients regain their olfactory abilities.

To select the study’s scents, Hummel turned to the odor prism. Developed by a German psychologist in 1916, each of the prism’s six corners represent a category of scent: flowery, fruity, spicy, resinous, putrid, and burnt. Much like a color wheel, every odor should fit somewhere on the prism. It’s a simplistic model, admits Hummel, and in reality some odors are quite difficult to classify. Nevertheless, he found it a useful starting point for his study. The goal was to stimulate different types of smell receptors, so he selected scents from four different corners. Over a 12-week period, study participants sniffed rose, eucalyptus, lemon, and cloves for ten seconds each, twice a day, morning and evening.

In the study published by Hummel and his colleagues in 2009, about 30 percent of those who underwent smell training reported an improvement in their smell, compared to only six percent — just one person — in the control group. By the end of the study, those who experienced improvement were able to perceive scents at lower concentrations, though even they did not get any better at discriminating one scent from another.

Since that initial trial, more than 20 studies have demonstrated some improvement with smell training. In an interview — parts of which were published last month by the digital magazine Neo.Life — London, Ontario-based ear, nose, and throat surgeon Brian Rotenberg characterized the evidence as compelling. “There is fairly strong evidence behind smell training as an effective means of improving sense of smell,” he said.

But Leigh Sowerby, also an ear, nose, and throat specialist in Ontario and Rotenberg’s research colleague, noted that the degree of recovery in studies that compare to a placebo was modest. “The improvement was clinically significant, but it was just barely,” Sowerby says. Both Sowerby and Rotenberg added that incremental benefits can still have an impact on a patient’s quality of life.

Sowerby says he has seen smell therapy take patients from having no sense of smell to having a little. For example, one patient who initially described pizza as tasting like cardboard eventually came to detect hints of pepperoni and tomato. The pizza still doesn’t taste like it used to, explains Sowerby, but the patient is at least “getting something.”

The original smell training technique includes only four odors, but according to Sowerby, adding additional scents can improve the approach’s effectiveness — as can training over a longer period of time. “The longer […]

Read more at www.salon.com

The tangy, peppery superfood: 7 Reasons to eat more arugula

The tangy, peppery superfood: 7 Reasons to eat more arugula

( Natural News ) Arugula is a green leafy vegetable used in salads, pizza and other popular dishes. The bitter vegetable , also known as garden rocket or roquette, is a staple in Mediterranean cuisine and widely used in France and Italy. These days, the plant is also found in dishes in the U.S., where its peppery flavor enhances the taste of pasta, sandwiches and sauces.

As a superfood, arugula is packed with phytonutrients that benefit the body in many ways. Here are seven health benefits of arugula:

> It promotes eye health. Arugula is rich in beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Beta-carotene is a carotenoid the body uses to create vitamin A. The bitter vegetable also contains lutein and zeaxanthin , both of which may prevent age-related macular degeneration and cataracts .

It may reduce the risk of cancer. Arugula contains glucosinolates — sulfur-containing compounds that are metabolized into indoles, thiocyanates and isothiocyanates. According to research, isothiocyanates exhibit anti-cancer properties . Studies also suggest that eating arugula can help reduce the risk of lung, prostate, breast and pancreatic cancer.

It is good for bone health. Arugula is a good source of calcium and vitamin K. In fact, it contains eight times more calcium than iceberg lettuce. Only three cups of the vegetable are needed to supply the body with 100 percent of its daily vitamin K needs. Vitamin K is needed to help the bones and teeth absorb calcium, thus promoting optimum bone health. People who have osteoporosis and those who are recovering from bone injuries are advised to eat arugula.

It promotes weight loss and supports digestion – Arugula contains only 25 calories per 100 grams . It is also low in carbohydrates but high in fiber. This fiber, together with arugula’s water content, may help with indigestion. Fiber can also help reduce food intake by promoting satiety.

It supports the growth of healthy skin – Because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, eating arugula is good for the skin. Since ancient times, people have been using this vegetable to treat common skin conditions like eczema, dry skin and acne. Adding arugula seed oil to your diet may also help protect your skin from harmful ultraviolet rays.

It is good for brain health – In a study that focused on the role of folate and other nutrients in preventing cognitive decline, researchers discovered that among high-functioning older adults, the risk of developing cognitive decline is higher for those who have low folate levels. The researchers thus concluded that increasing dietary folate intake can help reduce the risk of cognitive decline . Arugula is rich in folate and provides 97 micrograms of this essential vitamin per 100-gram serving.

It helps boost sexual performance – Eating arugula also benefits reproductive health. According to an animal study, arugula contains phytonutrients with aphrodisiac effects. The ancient Romans also used the vegetable as an aphrodisiac. (Related: Arugula is known as an aphrodisiac and as a top anti-cancer food .)

Arugula is a nutritious vegetable that offers plenty of health benefits. To learn more about the nutritional properties and medicinal uses of this superfood, visit Food.news .

Sources include:

NaturalHealth365.com

AOA.org

LPI.OregonState.edu

Conserve-Energy-Future.com

AMJMed.com

Read more at www.naturalnews.com

New brain-like computing device simulates human learning

New brain-like computing device simulates human learning

Researchers have developed a brain-like computing device that is capable of learning by association.

Similar to how famed physiologist Ivan Pavlov conditioned dogs to associate a bell with food, researchers at Northwestern University and the University of Hong Kong successfully conditioned their circuit to associate light with pressure.

The research was published today (April 30) in the journal Nature Communications.

The device’s secret lies within its novel organic, electrochemical “synaptic transistors,” which simultaneously process and store information just like the human brain. The researchers demonstrated that the transistor can mimic the short-term and long-term plasticity of synapses in the human brain, building on memories to learn over time.

With its brain-like ability, the novel transistor and circuit could potentially overcome the limitations of traditional computing, including their energy-sapping hardware and limited ability to perform multiple tasks at the same time. The brain-like device also has higher fault tolerance, continuing to operate smoothly even when some components fail. Jonathan Rivnay “Although the modern computer is outstanding, the human brain can easily outperform it in some complex and unstructured tasks, such as pattern recognition, motor control and multisensory integration,” said Northwestern’s Jonathan Rivnay , a senior author of the study. “This is thanks to the plasticity of the synapse, which is the basic building block of the brain’s computational power. These synapses enable the brain to work in a highly parallel, fault tolerant and energy-efficient manner. In our work, we demonstrate an organic, plastic transistor that mimics key functions of a biological synapse.”

Rivnay is an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering . He co-led the study with Paddy Chan, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Hong Kong. Xudong Ji, a postdoctoral researcher in Rivnay’s group, is the paper’s first author. Problems with conventional computing

Conventional, digital computing systems have separate processing and storage units, causing data-intensive tasks to consume large amounts of energy. Inspired by the combined computing and storage process in the human brain, researchers, in recent years, have sought to develop computers that operate more like the human brain, with arrays of devices that function like a network of neurons.

“The way our current computer systems work is that memory and logic are physically separated,” Ji said. “You perform computation and send that information to a memory unit. Then every time you want to retrieve that information, you have to recall it. If we can bring those two separate functions together, we can save space and save on energy costs.”

Currently, the memory resistor, or “memristor,” is the most well-developed technology that can perform combined processing and memory function, but memristors suffer from energy-costly switching and less biocompatibility. These drawbacks led researchers to the synaptic transistor – especially the organic electrochemical synaptic transistor, which operates with low voltages, continuously tunable memory and high compatibility for biological applications. Still, challenges exist.

“Even high-performing organic electrochemical synaptic transistors require the write operation to be decoupled from the read operation,” Rivnay said. “So if you want to retain memory, you have to disconnect it from the write process, which can further complicate integration into circuits or systems.” How the synaptic transistor works

To overcome these challenges, the Northwestern and University of Hong Kong team optimized a conductive, plastic material within the organic, electrochemical transistor that can trap ions. In the brain, a synapse is a structure through which a neuron can transmit signals to another neuron, using small molecules called neurotransmitters. In the synaptic transistor, ions behave similarly to neurotransmitters, sending signals between terminals to form an artificial synapse. By retaining stored data from trapped ions, the transistor remembers previous activities, developing long-term plasticity.

The researchers demonstrated their device’s synaptic behavior by connecting single synaptic transistors into a neuromorphic circuit to simulate associative learning. They integrated pressure and light sensors into the circuit and trained the circuit to associate the two unrelated physical inputs (pressure and light) with one another. The way our current computer systems work is that memory and logic are physically separated. If we can bring those two separate functions together, we can save space and save on energy costs” Xudong Ji postdoctoral fellow

Perhaps the most famous example of associative learning is Pavlov’s dog, which naturally drooled when it encountered food. After conditioning the dog to associate a bell ring with food, the dog also began drooling when it heard the sound of a bell. For the neuromorphic circuit, the researchers activated a voltage by applying pressure with a finger press. To condition the circuit to associate light with pressure, the researchers first applied pulsed light from an LED lightbulb and then immediately applied pressure. In this scenario, the pressure is the food and the light is the bell. The device’s corresponding sensors detected both inputs.

After one training cycle, the circuit made an initial connection between light and pressure. After five training cycles, the circuit significantly associated light with pressure. Light, alone, was able to trigger a signal, or “unconditioned response.” Future applications

Because the synaptic circuit is made of soft polymers, like a plastic, it can be readily fabricated on flexible sheets and easily integrated into soft, wearable electronics, smart robotics and implantable devices that directly interface with living tissue and even the brain.

“While our application is a proof of concept, our proposed circuit can be further extended to include more sensory inputs and integrated with other electronics to enable on-site, low-power computation,” Rivnay said. “Because it is compatible with biological environments, the device can directly interface with living tissue, which is critical for next-generation bioelectronics.”

The study, “Mimicking associative learning using an ion-trapping non-volatile synaptic organic electrochemical transistor,” was supported by the National Science Foundation (award number DMR-1751308), Hong Kong’s General Research Fund (award numbers HKU 17264016 and HKU 17204517) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

/Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here .

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Sonavel Reviews – Is Sonavel Supplement An Effective Hearing Support Formula? Effective Ingredients?

Sonavel Reviews - Is Sonavel Supplement An Effective Hearing Support Formula? Effective Ingredients?

• What is the Sonavel supplement?
• What are the ingredients of the Sonavel supplement?
• How does the Sonavel Hearing Support Formula work?
• How to consume the Sonavel supplement?
• What are the benefits of consuming the Sonavel supplement?
• How much does the Sonavel Tinnitus cost?
• Sonavel Supplement Reviews – Conclusion Sonavel Reviews: What is it?

Sonavel is a dietary supplement made with powerful natural ingredients to give you a perfect hearing support formula.

Sonavel is the only solution that uses all-natural ingredients in a perfect ratio prepared by Dr.Joseph Barnes .

The Sonavel supplement is made in the USA from globally sourced natural and high-quality ingredients.

The facility is FDA registered. Each ingredient is sourced after considering the specific species of the plants and herbs to get the best results.

Sonavel is a natural solution to support your brain and hearing . Sonavel supplement improves your memory and cognitive abilities in the process.

Sonavel is specially formulated for the people who have tried everything to improve their hearing but nothing worked. Sonavel tinnitus is proven to work for everyone!

As every hearing aid is temporary, we’re all suffering and fed up. Why is there no permanent solution to tinnitus and hearing loss?

The reason is no one is working on the root cause of hearing loss. Only Sonavel does that for you! Hence, it is the ultimate breakthrough in the market today. What are the ingredients of the Sonavel supplement?

Sonavel is made from a mix of several natural ingredients in an exact ratio to get the best results.

The natural ingredients are sourced from the purest places, these ingredients are as follows:

• Riboflavin: It aids auditory function and improves speech perception. Sonavel helps to build ATP molecules to energize your body and reduce brain fatigue.

Sonavel hearing supports formula mental health to transfer most inner ear signals to the brain efficiently.

Sonavel prevents migraine headaches. Sonavel is good for maintaining blood pressure levels. Sonavel supplement helps in treating tinnitus.

• Vitamin B6: It helps in manufacturing hormones, red blood cells and enzymes.

Sonavel tinnitus supports the production of serotonin to control mood, improve concentration and induce deep sleep.

Sonavel helps to support neurotransmitter pathways to prevent depression and tinnitus. It prevents memory loss.

• Folate: It is used to support your brain by the formation of neurotransmitters and supporting a healthy nervous system.

Sonavel helps with depression, mental fatigue and irritability. Sonavel helps in treating Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and memory loss.

Sonavel supplement helps in maintaining and producing red blood cells.

• Magnesium: It lowers the severity of tinnitus and helps in maintaining relaxed blood vessels.

Sonavel allows adequate blood to flow throughout the body, specifically to vessels in the inner ear. The ear hair cells are revitalised.

Sonavel tinnitus supports regular biochemical reactions in the body to prevent hearing loss during noise exposure.Sonavel supplement protects the inner ear hair follicles and has neuroprotective properties. • Potassium: It provides healthy circulation and supply of blood by maintaining blood pressure.Sonavel has a relieving effect on tinnitus. Sonavel supports other body fluids to function better.A perfect amount of potassium greatly boosts your overall health and supports the immune system. Sonavel supplement reduces noise-induced tinnitus. • Hibiscus Flower: Along with hawthorn berry, Hibiscus helps to prevent cardiovascular disorders.Sonavel hearing support formula supports your blood vessels by reducing blood pressure and poor blood flow.Sonavel supports your heart and reduces the beating, pumping or ringing sound in the ear.Sonavel supplement has blood sugar supporting properties with a nerve-calming effect. • Garlic bulb: It lowers blood pressure although it improves blood flow. It has anti-inflammatory properties to prevent hearing loss.Sonavel is a natural solution to reduce tinnitus and relieve ringing in the ears. Sonavel is also beneficial to reduce pain in the ear and it helps in preventing infections.Sonavel supports your immune system. Sonavel supplement has antifungal, antibacterial and pain-relieving effects. • Hawthorn Berry: It has a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect on the body to prevent and reduce blood fats and blood clogs.Sonavel helps to lower blood pressure that triggers tinnitus. It supports your heart and calms your nervous system.Sonavel tinnitus increases coronary blood flow without any side-effects. • Rosemary Herb: It has a nerve-calming effect and is used as an antiseptic. Sonavel supports your digestion and helps muscle relaxation.Sonavel is also a herbal treatment for tinnitus. Sonavel supplement helps to lower blood pressure that causes hypertension.It helps the inner ear to function better along with other parts of the body. Sonavel improves circulation to the head. • Green Tea: It is used to improve mood, concentration and support overall performance.Sonavel relaxes the body by preventing anxiety, relaxing nerves and muscles and also aids sleep.Green tea has an abundance of antioxidants to fight against free radicals and prevent oxidative stress and reduce cell damage. • Juniper Berry: It helps to fight against bacteria and viruses. Sonavel reduces inflammation and supports neurotransmitters in the brain.Sonavel is a powerful antioxidant that reverses the damage caused to your ear hair cells. Sonavel has various protective properties to support the immune system. • Vitamin C: It is used to prevent noise-induced hearing loss. It supports your blood vessels to carry blood and reduce blood pressure that ultimately improves brain health.Sonavel tinnitus is essential for bone, skin and cells. How does the Sonavel Hearing Formula really work? Sonavel is a powerful combination of various natural ingredients. It is used to treat tinnitus or ringing in the ear.The natural formula of Sonavel directly works on the root cause of hearing impairment and loss of mental capacity by providing essential nutrients and treatments. It is found in breakthrough research that it is the brain signal barrier that causes ringing in the ear caused by high blood pressure, stress or hypertension.Sonavel supports the dilation of blood vessels to help in improving blood flow and circulation.Sonavel helps the neurotransmitters to improve image formation and speech perception. The ear hair cells are directly linked to the major parts of the brain and not just the auditory […]

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What is ashwagandha good for?

What is ashwagandha good for?

Ashwagandha is known for its adaptogenic properties, supporting the adrenal and nervous systems and fighting stress symptoms and anxiety. Ashwagandha is a traditional medicinal herb used for thousands of years to reduce stress, boost brain function and increase energy. Newer scientific research also suggests that ashwagandha can boost fertility, lower cholesterol, balance blood sugar and more. In this article, we give you the full breakdown of ashwagandha’s health benefits and uses so you can decide if ashwagandha is right for you. If you’re curious about adding ashwagandha to your diet, keep reading for some of our top picks for ashwagandha supplements and powders.

Ashwagandha, also known as Indian ginseng or winter cherry, is a fruiting plant in the nightshade family (nightshades include peppers, eggplants and tomatoes among other common food plants). The plant is native to India and parts of Africa and the Middle East. Both the roots and the ripe berries of Ashwagandha have been used in traditional medicine, including Indian Ayurvedic medicine, for thousands of years. Ashwagandha is considered an “adaptogen,” meaning it may have properties that assist your body in fighting stress. Ashwagandha is typically taken as a powder, supplement or tea.

One study into Ashwagandha’s adaptogenic properties found that it blocked the stress pathway through regulating the nervous system. According to Healthline , several studies also found that ashwagandha reduced stress, anxiety and insomnia for participants, including those with stress and anxiety disorders. Ashwagandha also may improve sleep, especially in overstressed adults.

Ashwagandha’s stress-fighting properties may also help reduce the stress hormone cortisol. High cortisol levels can cause weight gain, acne, high blood pressure and a reduced immune response, among other symptoms. One study found that ashwagandha supplements lowered cortisol levels by 30% in adults with chronic stress.

Some studies suggest that ashwagandha can fight symptoms of depression by lowering stress levels and boosting energy. However, more research needs to be done to confirm these findings. If you’re dealing with depression, it’s best to consult a mental health professional before beginning treatment.

Many studies have found that ashwagandha supplements can boost reproductive health by increasing testosterone levels and sperm count. Studies suggest that these properties can also have a positive effect on body composition by increasing muscle mass and lowering body fat percentage.

Ashwagandha has been shown to have positive effects on our immune systems by increasing natural killer cells, immune cells that fight infections and keep the body in good health. Ashwagandha has also been shown to decrease inflammation, including the C-reactive protein (CRP), which is linked to heart disease.

Ashwagandha may be capable of boosting heart health by reducing LDL (bad) cholesterol and triglycerides, a type of fat cell linked to diabetes and high blood pressure. One study found that ashwagandha lowered overall cholesterol levels by 53%.

Research suggests that ashwagandha supplements support healthy brain function and memory by producing antioxidants that fight free radicals in our nerve cells. Ashwagandha has also traditionally been used in Indian Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years to improve memory in patients. These properties may also improve overall brain function, focus and productivity.

Ashwagandha is most commonly consumed as a supplement, in the form of powders, pills and tinctures. It may be taken on its own in its pure form or combined with other adaptogenic herbs, plants or mushrooms. Ashwagandha is also a common ingredient in calming or sleep-inducing supplements (like the Calm, Sweet Calm supplement by HUM Vitamins). You may also occasionally find ashwagandha as a tea or as a powder that can be added to smoothies, coffee and more.

Note: Be careful not to overdo it. Large doses of ashwagandha have been linked to a variety of digestive symptoms including upset stomach, diarrhea and vomiting. Some studies also suggest that ashwagandha might interfere or increase side effects with certain pharmaceuticals. Always consult your doctor before beginning a supplement routine.

The supplement industry is not regulated by the FDA, so you’ll want to pay close attention to sourcing and ingredient lists to ensure purity, potency and responsible sourcing. In general, ashwagandha supplements should not be taken during pregnancy and lactation.

Vitanica Adrenal Assist: available at iHerb and Amazon
This adaptogenic blend is specially formulated to balance the adrenal system and contains 100mg of ashwagandha root extract per serving in addition to Vitamins C, B5 and B6, holy basil and magnesium. Vitanica is a trusted brand with quality sourcing standards and the capsules are vegetarian and vegan friendly.

Gaia Herbs Ashwagandha Root Capsules: available at iHerb and Amazon
These capsules each contain 350mg of ashwagandha root extract and are rigorously tested for purity and potency. Gaia is a certified B-Corp business and sources their ashwagandha sustainably from their own farm in North Carolina and farming partners in India.

Organic Traditions Ashwagandha Root Powder: available at iHerb
This pure ashwagandha root powder is USDA certified organic and can be easily added to juices, water, coffee, tea, smoothies and other beverages. This powder contains no added fillers, flavors, preservatives or other additives.

Gaia Herbs Adrenal Support: available at Amazon and iHerb
This adrenal support blend from Gaia is formulated with rhodiola, holy basil, ashwagandha and oats to reduce stress and anxiety. This blend is also known for boosting energy. All Gaia products are tested for purity and screened for heavy metals, pesticide residue and microbes.

Eclectic Institute Ashwagandha Tincture: available at iHerb
This USDA organic, non-GMO tincture is formulated with pure dried organic ashwagandha root and grain-free alcohol. The tincture can be taken directly under the tongue or added to water, juice, or other beverages. This product is vegan and gluten, dairy and soy free.

Gaia Herbs SleepThru Sleep Support: available at Amazon and iHerb
This non-habit-forming sleep aid contains 940mg of ashwagandha, passion flower, magnolia bark and jujube dates to soothe stress-related insomnia and sleeplessness. This product is certified organic, non-GMO and free of any allergens or additives.

Katy Severson is a writer for BestReviews. BestReviews is a product review company with a singular mission: to help simplify your purchasing decisions and save […]

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