Doodling at work could help you be more productive

Doodling at work could help you be more productive

The next time you’re stuck on a project, stymied by a problem, or just stressed out at work, you might want to break out a pen and paper and start doodling. Research shows those random shapes, lines, and figures scrawled on the margins can help memory and cognition, boost creativity, and even just help us relax. In the last decade, those benefits have spurred a growing interest in more sophisticated forms of the practice in classrooms and workplaces. Sketchnoting , graphic recording , infodoodling, and other visual thinking applications, which combine words, pictures, symbols, and sketches, all aim to help people process information in a similar way to doodling. “It’s such a simple tool,” says Sunni Brown, author of The Doodle Revolution , which documents the benefits of doodling and visual language, “but it has so many implications and so many areas where it makes a real difference for people.” From the earliest age, we’re taught to sit at attention when someone is speaking to us. Scribbling random pictures in our notebooks has long been considered rude or disrespectful—just ask your middle-school history teacher. But Brown realized something as she traveled the world for work: people doodle everywhere. “I noticed this universal thing happening that seemed to be very useful, powerful, helpful, and natural, but it had no place in any of our institutions,” she says. “There was a disconnect there.” ‘Like having chocolate’ Expectations that we only need to listen to learn can make it difficult for some to distill information, especially for visual learners who absorb information best when they can see it. Doodling can help. When we doodle, according to research, we actually pay attention and remember more information . The practice can enhance memory in older adults. It can help with mental health , and […]

Type 2 diabetes: The great sugar debate and how to naturally lower blood sugar levels

Type 2 diabetes: The great sugar debate and how to naturally lower blood sugar levels

As type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But it is not that simple. Leading nutritionists, Lynn Grieger and Doctor Marilyn Glenville, discuss the effect of sugar and how you can stray away from sugary treats whilst still enjoying the sweeter things in life. “The idea that sugar affects diabetics has been around for years, but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” explains Grieger. Type 2 diabetes: One unpleasant sign you have it Type 2 diabetes: Three of the best supplements “I don’t think that anybody has put their finger on what the true cause of diabetes is, or that we’re going to find a single cause.” Diabetes.co.uk said on their website: “ Having diabetes doesn’t mean you have to cut sugar out completely. We all enjoy eating sugary foods occasionally, and there’s no problem including them as a treat in a healthy, balanced diet. "However, we are eating too much sugar, far too much, and harming our health as a result.” Doctor Marilyn Glenville said: “Excess sugar is very harmful, and even a slight lift in glucose levels in the bloodstream can be harmful to the brain, which can result in deficits in memory and slow cognitive function. "So, it’s time to swap those sugary cherry drops for some naturally sweet dried fruit. Raisins and dates are great to fight off your sugar fix, and if you are into your cakes and tasty bakes, add raisins or sultanas to make a pie or crumble that little bit sweeter. "Spices like cinnamon and vanilla also add lots of sweetness and flavour, allowing you to reduce the […]

Doodling at work could help you be more productive

Doodling at work could help you be more productive

The next time you’re stuck on a project, stymied by a problem, or just stressed out at work, you might want to break out a pen and paper and start doodling. Research shows those random shapes, lines, and figures scrawled on the margins can help memory and cognition, boost creativity, and even just help us relax. In the last decade, those benefits have spurred a growing interest in more sophisticated forms of the practice in classrooms and workplaces. Sketchnoting , graphic recording , infodoodling, and other visual thinking applications, which combine words, pictures, symbols, and sketches, all aim to help people process information in a similar way to doodling. “It’s such a simple tool,” says Sunni Brown, author of The Doodle Revolution , which documents the benefits of doodling and visual language, “but it has so many implications and so many areas where it makes a real difference for people.” From the earliest age, we’re taught to sit at attention when someone is speaking to us. Scribbling random pictures in our notebooks has long been considered rude or disrespectful—just ask your middle-school history teacher. But Brown realized something as she traveled the world for work: people doodle everywhere. “I noticed this universal thing happening that seemed to be very useful, powerful, helpful, and natural, but it had no place in any of our institutions,” she says. “There was a disconnect there.” ‘Like having chocolate’ Expectations that we only need to listen to learn can make it difficult for some to distill information, especially for visual learners who absorb information best when they can see it. Doodling can help. When we doodle, according to research, we actually pay attention and remember more information . The practice can enhance memory in older adults. It can help with mental health , and […]

NJIT’s Bipin Rajendran is named a Senior Member of the National Academy of Inventors

Bipin Rajendran, an engineer who develops computing systems that aim to match the efficiency seen in nature by studying the organizational principles of the brain, has been elected a Senior Member of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). NAI Senior Members are active faculty, scientists and administrators "who have demonstrated remarkable innovation-producing technologies that have brought or aspire to bring, real impact on the welfare of society," according to the Academy. They have also proved successful in patenting, licensing and commercializing their inventions. Rajendran, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering and expert in nanoscale electronic devices and system design, holds 59 issued U.S. patents. He joins a class of 54 newly elected members from institutions including Yale University, the Texas Heart Institute and the Naval Information Warfare Center. "Advances in computing have enabled systems with astonishing capabilities that augment and even surpass human capacity in many facets of life, but there is a crucial gap in all of these awe-inspiring artificial systems: the enormous amount of energy they consume to perform their tasks," he notes of technologies such as two-legged humanoid robots developed for search-and-rescue operations in hazardous environments and big data-analytics engines that work alongside doctors to diagnose diseases and suggest treatment plans. He adds, "While the Watson supercomputer from IBM required 85,000 watts to challenge and ultimately vanquish two "Jeopardy!" champions, Watson’s conqueror, former U.S. Congressman Rush Holt, relied on a far more efficient machine — the human brain — which functions on a mere 20 watts." At the heart of these brain-inspired systems are artificial neural networks, which are mathematical models of the networks of neurons and synapses in the brain. In order to endow them with human-like intelligence, vast troves of information are fed to them, and their internal parameters — the strengths […]

Here are the best reasons why you should go nuts with organic almonds

Here are the best reasons why you should go nuts with organic almonds

( Natural News ) Almonds are a nutritious superfood that has been around for thousands of years. In fact, the ancient Egyptian and Hindu cultures treated almonds as prized treasures, even going so far as to insert almond tree branches into valuable jewelry cases, boxes, and vases. These delectable nuts were widely believed to enhance both intelligence and longevity. Today, almonds are praised around the world for their considerable nutritional benefits. Not only are they low in saturated fatty acids and packed with health-boosting unsaturated fatty acids, but they also contain plenty of fiber, phytosterol antioxidants, and plant proteins. Rich, crunchy, and incredibly nutritious, almonds are among the most perfect and versatile snack foods in the world. Almonds are also considered “energy-dense.” This means that they pack a whole range of important nutrients and chemical compounds. If you want to further boost the nutrient content of your almonds, you can soak some raw almonds overnight for around eight to 12 hours. Not only does this make the nutrients easier to absorb, it also makes it easier for you to remove the almond’s brown peels. These peels contain an antinutrient called tannin, which can inhibit nutrient absorption. Soaking your almonds also releases beneficial enzymes that support healthy digestion. Proven health benefits of almonds Aside from boasting an impressive nutrition profile, almonds also offer a multitude of health benefits. Here are some of the best reasons why you should start adding almonds to your diet. Supports healthy heart functions: Almonds contain high levels of antioxidants that promote optimal cardiovascular health and help boost your immunity. Moreover, they contain an abundance of good fatty acids that support healthy cholesterol levels already within the normal range. GLYPHOSATE testing is now being applied to all Health Ranger Store branded products. Our in-house lab uses […]

NJIT’s Bipin Rajendran is named a Senior Member of the National Academy of Inventors

Bipin Rajendran, an engineer who develops computing systems that aim to match the efficiency seen in nature by studying the organizational principles of the brain, has been elected a Senior Member of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). NAI Senior Members are active faculty, scientists and administrators "who have demonstrated remarkable innovation-producing technologies that have brought or aspire to bring, real impact on the welfare of society," according to the Academy. They have also proved successful in patenting, licensing and commercializing their inventions. Rajendran, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering and expert in nanoscale electronic devices and system design, holds 59 issued U.S. patents. He joins a class of 54 newly elected members from institutions including Yale University, the Texas Heart Institute and the Naval Information Warfare Center. "Advances in computing have enabled systems with astonishing capabilities that augment and even surpass human capacity in many facets of life, but there is a crucial gap in all of these awe-inspiring artificial systems: the enormous amount of energy they consume to perform their tasks," he notes of technologies such as two-legged humanoid robots developed for search-and-rescue operations in hazardous environments and big data-analytics engines that work alongside doctors to diagnose diseases and suggest treatment plans. He adds, "While the Watson supercomputer from IBM required 85,000 watts to challenge and ultimately vanquish two "Jeopardy!" champions, Watson’s conqueror, former U.S. Congressman Rush Holt, relied on a far more efficient machine — the human brain — which functions on a mere 20 watts." At the heart of these brain-inspired systems are artificial neural networks, which are mathematical models of the networks of neurons and synapses in the brain. In order to endow them with human-like intelligence, vast troves of information are fed to them, and their internal parameters — the strengths […]

Doodling at work could help you be more productive

Doodling at work could help you be more productive

The next time you’re stuck on a project, stymied by a problem, or just stressed out at work, you might want to break out a pen and paper and start doodling. Research shows those random shapes, lines, and figures scrawled on the margins can help memory and cognition, boost creativity, and even just help us relax. In the last decade, those benefits have spurred a growing interest in more sophisticated forms of the practice in classrooms and workplaces. Sketchnoting , graphic recording , infodoodling, and other visual thinking applications, which combine words, pictures, symbols, and sketches, all aim to help people process information in a similar way to doodling. “It’s such a simple tool,” says Sunni Brown, author of The Doodle Revolution , which documents the benefits of doodling and visual language, “but it has so many implications and so many areas where it makes a real difference for people.” From the earliest age, we’re taught to sit at attention when someone is speaking to us. Scribbling random pictures in our notebooks has long been considered rude or disrespectful—just ask your middle-school history teacher. But Brown realized something as she traveled the world for work: people doodle everywhere. “I noticed this universal thing happening that seemed to be very useful, powerful, helpful, and natural, but it had no place in any of our institutions,” she says. “There was a disconnect there.” ‘Like having chocolate’ Expectations that we only need to listen to learn can make it difficult for some to distill information, especially for visual learners who absorb information best when they can see it. Doodling can help. When we doodle, according to research, we actually pay attention and remember more information . The practice can enhance memory in older adults. It can help with mental health , and […]

How MINERAL Can Help Customers with Chronic Anxiety

How MINERAL Can Help Customers with Chronic Anxiety

File mineralhealth.co MINERAL is a well-known business that offers high-quality cannabidiol. This beneficial oil can reduce anxiety, enhance the effectiveness of serotonin, decrease levels of cortisol, relieve chronic soreness, and mitigate the effects of long-term stress. Various reports have also indicated that CBD oil may decrease neural inflammation, improve mental clarity, reduce nervousness, optimize attentiveness, and stimulate critical thinking. Reducing Anxiety and Improving Well-Being Generally, chronic anxiety can be caused by neural inflammation, and sometimes, the inflammation can increase the risk of other medical conditions. According to numerous studies, CBD oil may substantially reduce neural inflammation and relieve chronic anxiety. The compound could also mitigate the effects of cytokines, which are enzymes that may exacerbate systemic inflammation. Optimizing the Effectiveness of Serotonin Each individual’s brain consistently creates serotonin, a neurotransmitter that increases energy and reduces stress. Numerous reports suggest that cannabinoids may stimulate serotonin receptors, and consequently, the cannabinoids can enhance the effects of serotonin. Examining the Benefits of Terpenes Based in Austin, Texas, MINERAL frequently tests its CBD oil products to optimize the quality of the compound. The business sells CBD oil that has high levels of terpenes, natural alkaloids that may decrease neural inflammation and optimize critical thinking. Generally, terpenes can effectively stimulate the respiratory system, so the natural compounds may optimize the oxygenation of blood, improve airflow, and reduce the effects of fatigue. Modulating the Production of Cortisol Various studies indicate that chronic stress can increase the production of cortisol, a hormone that may reduce energy and influence metabolism. Cortisol also affects alertness, reduces the effectiveness of beneficial hormones, and causes inflammation. According to various reports, cannabinoids can significantly decrease the production of cortisol and mitigate the effects of the stress hormone. Increasing Neurogenesis Cannabinoids can stimulate neurogenesis, which means that the compounds could promote the […]

Adding coconut oil to your keto diet can prevent, treat Alzheimer’s

Adding coconut oil to your keto diet can prevent, treat Alzheimer’s

( Natural News ) A recent review of dietary interventions aimed at preventing and treating Alzheimer’s disease suggests that the ketogenic diet is a promising nutritional approach , and at the forefront of this recent finding is coconut oil. Researchers from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand examined existing studies on the prevention and reversal of Alzheimer’s, including in vitro studies and animal or human studies. In their review, which appeared in the journal Nutrition , the researchers expressed concern about pharmaceutical approaches failing to prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s disease time and again. This has made them turn their attention to dietary interventions . Researchers highlight a more basic underlying cause of the onset of Alzheimer’s disease The Canterbury researchers reviewed 33 studies which focused on dietary approaches for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Not all of them involved the keto diet (KD); some were variations of low-carb diets, such as the Atkins diet . The researchers examined common aspects highlighted in the 33 studies to further understand the mechanics of AD. Instead of the widely accepted causes of the disease, namely, amyloid-beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the researchers identified a more basic underlying cause: low levels of cholesterol in the brain. Regardless of the established causes, experts now understand AD’s features enough to recommend dietary approaches for its prevention and reversal. While these take amyloid-beta plaques into consideration, amyloid plaques have also been seen in the brains of people with normal memory and reasoning abilities, hence it is considered a weak factor in the onset of AD. Discover how to prevent and reverse heart disease (and other cardio related events) with this free ebook : Written by popular Natural News writer Vicki Batt, this book includes everything you need to know about preventing heart disease, reversing hypertension, and […]

Mothers who smile a lot at their babies and maintain eye contact “sync up” with them, improving brain development

Mothers who smile a lot at their babies and maintain eye contact “sync up” with them, improving brain development

( Natural News ) Parents sometimes feel like there is a disconnect between them and their children, especially grown-up ones. But according to researchers from the University of Cambridge in the U.K., that probably wasn’t always the case. There was a time during their infancy when these children were in sync with their mothers, and this event facilitated how they learned about their social environment. In a new study presented early this year at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society’s (CNS) annual meeting in San Francisco, a team of cognitive neuroscientists showed evidence of neural synchrony between mother and child . This synchronization of brainwaves, according to their findings, is directly related to a baby’s social learning. How mothers and their babies connect “neurally” According to the researchers, being physically present to connect with an infant is nothing short of priceless. That is one of the many reasons that spurred them to conduct their study. In it, they investigated how a mother’s emotional responses toward various toys affected their babies’ interest in playing with them. The researchers attached wireless electroencephalograms (EEG) to both members and allowed the babies to watch their mothers’ reactions toward certain objects. The mothers either smiled and said things like, “I like this” to show their approval (positive emotion), or frowned and said, “I don’t like this” to show their disapproval (negative emotion). The researchers then presented the toys to the babies and allowed them to choose which ones to play with. Discover how to prevent and reverse heart disease (and other cardio related events) with this free ebook : Written by popular Natural News writer Vicki Batt, this book includes everything you need to know about preventing heart disease, reversing hypertension, and nurturing your cardiac health without medication. Learn More. The researchers reported that the mothers’ […]