Japanese plum offers protection against fatty liver, reveals study

Japanese plum offers protection against fatty liver, reveals study

( Natural News ) Researchers from Chonnam National University in South Korea have found that Eriobotrya japonica , commonly referred to as Japanese plum or loquat, can help protect the liver from damage caused by diet or alcohol intake . In their report, they looked at how Japanese plum can help liver cells at risk of damage from alcohol or free fatty acids. The results of the study were published in the Journal of Medicinal Food . Poor diet, heavy alcohol use damage the liver

The liver is an essential organ of the body. The largest organ inside the body, the liver helps digest food and store energy — even remove poisons. However, its many functions put it at higher risk of disease and injury, in particular, hepatic steatosis.

Hepatic steatosis , better known as fatty liver disease, happens when extra fat is stored in the liver . While the liver stores a small amount of fat, it becomes a problem when fat reaches around 10 percent of the liver’s weight.

It’s worth noting that fatty liver disease has no symptoms at its onset. However, the condition can get worse over time and progress in three stages: Steatohepatitis , marked by liver inflammation and tissue damage

Fibrosis , which occurs when scar tissue forms in damaged areas of the liver

Cirrhosis , a serious condition where scar tissue replaces healthy tissue

Cirrhosis can often lead to liver cancer and even outright liver failure. Advanced cirrhosis is life-threatening.

Hepatic steatosis has two main forms: Alcoholic liver disease , wherein a person develops a fatty liver due to heavy alcohol use. In the U.S., around five percent of adults have this form of disease.

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) , wherein a person develops a fatty liver even if they aren’t drinkers. NAFLD is worrisome, as it is prevalent: A third of American adults — and 10 percent of children — have this condition. According to studies, several factors like obesity and diabetes can increase a person’s risk of getting NAFLD.

Japanese plum can protect liver from damage

In their report, the researchers looked at whether Japanese plum can help prevent fatty liver .

Earlier studies had shown that the plant could help in treating hepatic steatosis. A 2017 study published in the journal Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy concluded that leaf extracts from Japanese plum could potentially treat NAFLD . In addition, a study published in The Korean Journal of Community Living Science concluded that leaf extracts from the Japanese plum could protect the liver from alcohol-induced damage .

The team also used Japanese plum leaves to create a hot water extract. They used this hot water extract to pretreat liver cells before exposing them to ethanol and free fatty acids to induce alcoholic liver disease and NAFLD, respectively. The findings revealed that the hot water extract from Japanese plum exhibited antioxidant properties and inhibited lipid accumulation in pretreated liver cells. Lipid accumulation, according to research, not only increases a person’s risk of hepatic steatosis but also his risk of developing insulin resistance — a precursor to diabetes and other chronic conditions.

In addition, liver cells pretreated with hot water extract from Japanese plum exhibited increased 5’adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. When activated in the proper tissues — like the brain, liver and skeletal muscles — this brings about multiple benefits , including improved insulin sensitivity, enhanced muscle performance and reduced inflammation, among others.

The results suggest that Japanese plum extract can prevent both alcohol- and free fatty acid-induced oxidative damage and lipid accumulation in liver cells.

Learn more natural treatments for liver damage at NaturalMedicine.news .

Sources include:

My.ClevelandClinic.org

LipidWorld.BioMedCentral.com

Read more at www.naturalnews.com

5 Kid-friendly herbs for treating different ailments

5 Kid-friendly herbs for treating different ailments

( Natural News ) Natural remedies have long been known for effectively addressing different ailments without the dangerous side effects that come with conventional medicine. Many parents nowadays are choosing natural cures whenever their children get sick. They head over to their gardens instead of the nearby pharmacy whenever their children experience a fever.

But with the many different herbs around, some might not be safe for young ones and could cause more harm than good. Here are five effective herbs that treat different ailments, and are proven safe for children. Elderberry

Elderberries are known to boost the immune system and decrease the risk of getting sick. They also possess antimicrobial properties that prevent bacteria inside the body from multiplying and causing an infection.

Back in 2004, medical experts found that elderberry syrup is effective in helping people with influenza recover faster than those who did not take it or who only relied on a placebo. This is because of a compound in elderberries that prevents the flu virus from sticking to cell walls and replicating inside human cells. Oregano

Oregano is more known as an herb that can be added into different dishes. But oregano oil has also gained popularity due to its antibacterial, anti-parasitic and antiviral properties. (Related: Carvacrol, a compound found in oregano, exhibits powerful antimicrobial properties .)

Aside from this, oregano oil has been found to have natural pain-killing properties, thanks to a study by Turkish researchers. The study authors noted in their June 1996 study that essential oil from the Greek oregano exhibits similar activity to conventional pain relief medicine, with the content of the compound carvacrol determining how effective its pain-killing properties are. Cinnamon

Cinnamon is commonly used to flavor baked goods for children. This fragrant herb – whether in the form of bark, powder or essential oil – also helps boost children’s health. When given to babies , cinnamon contributes positively to their brain development due to its phytochemicals that boost the brain’s ability to utilize glucose.

Cinnamon strengthens the immune system against mild to severe infection caused by pathogens. It also possesses antioxidant properties, making it a suitable herb for removing harmful substances in the body. Chamomile

Adults often drink chamomile tea to relax, but children can likewise benefit from drinking it. Chamomile naturally addresses anxiety, tension and nervousness, making it a good choice for helping children settle down before bedtime.

Hot chamomile tea relieves digestive problems in children such as stomach ache and colic, while cold tea relieves teething discomfort, nausea and diarrhea. Chamomile can also be used on wounds, insect bites and different skin conditions. Lemon balm

Similar to chamomile, children who experience anxiety or difficulty sleeping may find lemon balm to be helpful in calming them down. This herb is known for relieving mild anxiety, making it suitable for children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (Related: Lemon balm is excellent survival medicine: Review of its medicinal properties and how to use it .)

A 2004 study showed that people who took a 600 milligram (mg) dose of lemon balm reported calmer moods following assessment. The same study has found that people taking 300 mg of lemon balm have reported improvements in cognitive function after a battery of tests. Thus, lemon balm not only helps relieve children’s anxiety – it also helps them concentrate. Safety precautions on these herbs

While these herbs are known for their healing properties, it is important to note that giving children too much of these may cause more harm than good. Most herb-based remedies come in the form of essential oils, so diluting them in base oils is advised before giving to children.

While some essential oils can be used directly, several kinds are not advised entirely for children under a certain age. Oregano and cinnamon essential oils are not advisable for use among children below two years. This is because their skin is extremely sensitive and their bodies metabolize oils differently compared to older children or adults.

Possible allergies to these herbs should also be monitored. While chamomile and cinnamon are generally safe for children, some may show allergic reactions to them. Symptoms include red spots where the herbs touch the skin, runny nose and watery eyes.

PlantMedicine.news has more articles about natural and child-friendly remedies.

Sources include:

OnlineLibrary.Wiley.com

Journals.LWW.com

Read more at www.naturalnews.com

Published Study Shows Healthy Extracts Breakthrough Nutraceutical Formulation, ACTIVATE, Naturally Enhances Key Brain Activity by 46%

Published Study Shows Healthy Extracts Breakthrough Nutraceutical Formulation, ACTIVATE, Naturally Enhances Key Brain Activity by 46%

UBN ACTIVATE™

UBN ACTIVATE™ is clinically proven to enhance brain function, improve cognition, memory, focus, and mood while supporting natural sleep patterns at night. UBN ACTIVATE™ is clinically proven to enhance brain function, improve cognition, memory, focus, and mood while supporting natural sleep patterns at night.

LAS VEGAS, Sept. 14, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Healthy Extracts Inc. (OTCQB: HYEX), a leading innovator of clinically proven plant-based products for heart and brain health, announced a pilot study was recently published in Annals of Reviews and Research highlighting the ability of its Ultimate Brain Nutrients™ (UBN™) ACTIVATE ™ to naturally increase key brain activity by as much as 46%.

The article titled, A Phytonutrient Based Brain Activation Complex and Short-Term Brain Function Changes: An Initial Investigation , describes how the consumption of ACTIVATE can dramatically improve human cognitive behavior and mental focus by activating areas of the brain primarily responsible for attention, memory, mood, and quick reaction times.

“Publication of this study represents an incredible contribution to the food and nutrition industry, especially regarding the effectiveness of our nootropics ACTIVATE,” stated Healthy Extracts president, Duke Pitts. “These published results validate the benefits that can be derived from our expanding portfolio of natural nutrient formulations for brain health and cognition.”

“Clinical validation differentiates us from our competitors, and provides customers the confidence to choose our products and encourages their daily consumption,” added Pitts. “It also instills confidence in potential distribution partners who have stringent standards, and this supports our efforts to expand our sales channels in the U.S. and globally.”

UBN has two patents issued and multiple pending applications on its proprietary F4T ® formulations. They have been in development for more than 20 years and are now supported by more than 100 clinical studies. The products address the fast-growing brain health supplement market, which is expected to grow at an 8% compounded annual growth rate to reach $13.4 billion by 2028.

To learn more about ACTIVATE and Healthy Extracts’ other products, go to tryubn.com and bergametna.com .

Read more at finance.yahoo.com

Essential oil from this Turkish medicinal plant found to reduce dementia-related anxiety and depression

Essential oil from this Turkish medicinal plant found to reduce dementia-related anxiety and depression

( Natural News ) A species of St. John’s wort ( Hypericum ) that’s native to Central Asia may alleviate depression and anxiety, especially for those with dementia. In a report published in the Journal of Essential Oil Research , researchers from Firat University in Turkey examined the anti-anxiety and anti-depression properties of Hypericum scabrum . Behavioral changes among those with dementia

Dementia isn’t a specific disease; rather, it’s the umbrella term for conditions which are marked by a decline in cognitive function and loss of functional independence . According to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , approximately 5 million people around the age of 65 have been diagnosed with a type of dementia, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease. Experts predict these figures could go as high as 14 million by 2060.

It’s easy to dismiss dementia as a part of normal aging. However, many older adults live their lives without developing dementia. While these individuals experience age-related memory changes, such as occasionally forgetting names and recent events, their knowledge, skills and experiences stay intact.

People with dementia also experience memory changes, but these cause them to get lost even in familiar places or ask questions repeatedly. Compared to those experienced by healthy older adults, these changes can disrupt daily life. People with dementia also have problems with attention, communication, visual perception and reasoning.

In addition, people with dementia suffer from behavioral and psychological symptoms . It’s very common for them to exhibit apathy, depression and anxiety. Four out of 10 patients with dementia suffer from depression, while nine out of 10 patients show apathy in the latter stages of the disease.

Anxiety , on the other hand, is often seen in patients who still have good insight and awareness of their condition , such as those suffering from vascular or frontotemporal dementia (FTD). It’s worth noting that the causes of anxiety for those with dementia are similar to those without the condition. They include having a history of traumatic events, extreme worry and damage to parts of the brain that regulate emotion. Hypericum scabrum has anxiolytic and anti-depressive properties

In their report, Turkish researchers looked at H. scabrum , a plant native to Central Asia and western China, and its potential as a treatment for dementia-related depression and anxiety. The plant has long been used in traditional medicine: In Uzbekistan, it is used to treat diseases ranging from cystitis to heart disease , while in southwest China, the plant is used as a local remedy . Meanwhile, folk healers in Iran use H. scabrum to relieve pain and treat headaches, among others.

For their study, the researchers examined the effects of H. scabrum essential oil on anxiety and depressive-like behavior using an animal model of dementia. They made rats inhale the essential oil regularly for three weeks. They then treated the rats with scopolamine, a drug that can induce memory deficits similar to those seen in older adults. After scopolamine treatment, they subjected the rats to behavioral tests.

The researchers found that rats treated with H. scabrum essential oil performed markedly better on tests than untreated ones, suggesting that the oil has anti-anxiety and antidepressant effects. (Related: St. John’s wort: A scientific review of its remarkable antibacterial and antioxidant properties .)

In a follow-up study, the team also explored the potential memory-enhancing properties of H. scabrum essential oil using a rat model of dementia. For this, the researchers evaluated how well the essential oil can improve the spatial memory of rats with dementia compared to conventional drug therapies (diazepam and tramadol). They found that H. scabrum essential oil can be used as a complementary therapy for reducing memory impairment in patients with dementia and similar diseases.

Learn more about natural treatments for dementia at Alzheimers.news .

Sources include:

CDC.gov

IJPRS.ir

Read more at www.naturalnews.com

3 Foods That Could Be Causing Your Bout of Brain Fog, and What RDs Recommend Eating Instead

3 Foods That Could Be Causing Your Bout of Brain Fog, and What RDs Recommend Eating Instead

e all know the feeling. It’s 3pm (or 3am), the edges have blurred, nothing is really registering, and it would be a challenge to tell someone your name—much less answer the question your boss just levied at you. It is not a hangover, you’re not under the weather or dealing with low blood sugar, and you actually got eight hours of sleep last night. So what gives? Chances are, you’re dealing with a minor bout of brain fog , a relatively common feeling that folks experience, sometimes without a clear catalyst.

“Brain fog is a term used to describe a feeling of not being able to think as sharply and clearly as you’re used to,” says Samantha Cassetty, RD . “Sometimes people say they feel fuzzy or cloudy, and it can be associated with peri-menopause and menopause.” That said, Cassetty adds that brain fog often exists in the absence of any known cause.

“Brain fog is not a medical condition, but rather a symptom,” says Keri Gans, RDN , in agreement. “There may be many factors, such as lack of sleep, too much sleep, depression, certain medications or illness, dehydration, or diet.” While it can be difficult to control many of these factors, there are certain foods that may amplify some of the symptoms associated with brain fog . We chatted with both Cassetty and Gans to learn more about the foods that may be making us a little more drowsy and a little less sharp—i.e. somewhere generally south of our usual mental clarity and focus A-game. 3 foods that contribute to brain fog, according to RDs

1. Heavily processed foods, including processed meat and sugary beverages

“In general, heavily-processed foods that are high in refined grains, added sugars, and sodium are likely culprits of brain fog,” says Cassetty. “Processed meats and artificial sweeteners may also be linked to brain fog.” These categories can indeed be applied to that sweet late-afternoon latte you were hoping would give you a mental boost.

Cassetty notes that when folks swap out heavily-processed foods for whole or minimally-processed plant foods, some will experience better mental clarity and energy. “Sometimes people don’t even realize how foggy they feel until they start feeling sharper by making some lifestyle adjustments,” she notes.

When it comes to choosing a snack that will help you focus, Maya Feller, MS, RD , recommends balancing fresh produce with lean protein or fat, and drinking plenty of water. “I encourage afternoon snacks that provide sustained energy, rather than heavily processed, sugary ones that give a boost followed by a crash,” she previously told Well+Good . Her number-one tip: “Combine nutrient-rich fruits or veggies that give quick energy and hydration with a lean protein or fat for staying power.” 2. Alcohol

Yes, sometimes, the culprit of your foggy feeling is indeed none other than alcohol. As such, experts recommend being careful about over-imbibing on a daily basis. “It is a good idea to stay within the alcohol limits of no more than one drink a day for women and no more than two drinks a day for men,” Cassetty recommends. While occasional celebrating is only natural, excessive consumption of alcohol is dangerous and linked to increased risk of chronic illness, liver disease, and insomnia, among many other serious health concerns.

If you’re in search of a beverage that will give your brain health a boost, try this delicious (and energizing) herbal tea made with cacao, rosemary, and other nootropics. According to herbalist Rachelle Robinett , nootropics are a great way to get a boost of energy and clarity. Since these herbs don’t have caffeine, you can sip the tea in the evening in place of your nightcap—plus they may help you feel “more balanced, which ultimately results in better energy,” she says.

Find the recipe and all of its brain-boosting benefits here: 3. A lack of fruits and vegetables

If you’re looking to cut processed foods, an easy way to do so is to opt toward fruits and vegetables in their purest form. “Fill half your plate with vegetables or fruits or a mix of the two,” Cassetty recommends. “If you’re not anywhere close to eating this way, don’t worry. Work your way up, starting with one meal or one snack. Numerous studies suggest that this eating pattern can sharpen thinking and improve memory and cognitive skills.”

Feller agrees, saying that two great brain-boosting snacks are veggies and a protein-packed dip (like hummus) or fruit. “Fruit’s a great choice in the afternoon as long as you balance it out with protein and fat, like a serving of nuts and one ounce of cheese.” You can also up your fruit intake by pairing dried fruit like raisins with nuts for a heart-healthy trail mix. RD tips and foods for preventing brain fog

In addition to keeping an eye on processed foods, alcohol, and a lack of fresh produce in your diet, there are other ways to reduce brain fog, experts say. “Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory-rich plant foods can reduce oxidative stress and inflammation that may induce the feeling of brain fog,” Cassetty notes. That means that instead of a piece of white toast, opt for whole-grain toast. Try to eat brown rice or quinoa in place of white rice, and switch from sugary cereals to whole-grain, low-sugar versions. The addition of fiber in these lesser-refined foods will help your blood sugar levels stay stable, which also helps with focus and mental clarity.

Moreover, it’s worth paying attention to the source of fat in your diet. Replace saturated fats with better-for-you unsaturated options like extra virgin olive oil and avocado oil when possible, and snack on avocados, walnuts, and chia seeds.

Gans and Cassetty both also strongly emphasizes the importance of brain-boosting behaviors, including resting, being active, and managing stress. “Aim to get 7-9 hours of sleep per night,” Gans says. Cassetty agrees, saying that “exercise, sleep, and finding healthy ways to cope with stress are all beneficial to your brain health and can help you prevent brain fog.”

All of this aside, it’s […]

Read more at www.wellandgood.com

Bone Marrow Butter

Bone Marrow Butter

🖨️ Print post

Traditional peoples who consumed large animals did not ignore the marrow hidden away in the bones; in fact, they valued the marrow as an extremely nutritious food.

Weston A. Price provides us with a good example in his book Nutrition and Physical Degeneration : “For the Indians living inside the Rocky Mountain Range in the far North of Canada, the successful nutrition for nine months of the year was largely limited to wild game, chiefly moose and caribou. During the summer months the Indians were able to use growing plants. During the winter some use was made of bark and buds of trees. I found the Indians putting great emphasis upon the eating of the organs of the animals, including the wall of parts of the digestive tract. Much of the muscle meat of the animals was fed to the dogs. It is important that skeletons are rarely found where large game animals have been slaughtered by the Indians of the North. The skeletal remains are found as piles of finely broken bone chips or splinters that have been cracked up to obtain as much as possible of the marrow and nutritive qualities of the bones. These Indians obtain their fat-soluble vitamins and also most of their minerals from the organs of the animals. An important part of the nutrition of the children consisted in various preparations of bone marrow, both as a substitute for milk and as a special dietary ration.” Read more about bone marrow in our article on the topic. We previously published another variation of this recipe provided to us by Monica Corrado as well.

Despite bone marrow being a staple in the human diet for most of our existence, it’s not nearly as popular today as it once was. It’s starting to regain popularity in culinary circles and in fine-dining restaurants because of its unique, pleasant, and creamy taste. Ingredients

4 oz boiled or roasted organic, pasture raised bone marrow
(use bones to make a broth)
4 oz soft organic, pasture raised butter
1 tsp salt flakes
1 tsp dried ramps (optional) Instructions

Blend everything with immersion blender. Use as you would butter. It tastes so much better than a butter; it has a sweet, nutty flavor and a lighter, more delicate texture.

🖨️ Print post
🖨️ Print post

Learn about the meaning behind our logo above.

This is a Web version of 28-page printed informational 28-page printed informational booklet . You may order printed copies via our Store.

The Weston A. Price Foundation only accepts contributions from members and/or private donations, and does not accept funds from the meat or dairy industries. Life in all its splendor is Mother Nature obeyed. – Weston A. Price, DDS

Contents

About Dr. Weston A. Price
Characteristics of Traditional Diets – 11 Principles
Dietary Guidelines
Dietary Dangers
Confused about Fats?
The Many Roles of Saturated Fats
The Fat-Soluble Activators
What’s Wrong With “Politically Correct” Nutrition?
Traditional vs. Modern Diets
Myths and Truths About Nutrition
Myths and Truths About Soy
Soy Infant Formula: Birth Control Pills for Babies
Coronary Heart Disease: What the Expert Say
Principles of Holistic Dentistry
The Weston A. Price Foundation
Become a Member of the Weston A. Price Foundation About Dr. Weston A. Price

In the early 1930s, a Cleveland dentist named Weston A. Price (1870-1948) began a series of unique investigations. His portrait on the left is provided courtesy of the Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation who owns the copyright.

For over ten years, he traveled to isolated parts of the globe to study the health of populations untouched by western civilization. His goal was to discover the factors responsible for good dental health. His studies revealed that dental caries and deformed dental arches resulting in crowded, crooked teeth are the result of nutritional deficiencies, not inherited genetic defects.
The groups Price studied included remote villages in Switzerland, Gaelic communities in the Outer Hebrides, indigenous peoples of North and South America, Melanesian and Polynesian South Sea Islanders, African tribes, Australian Aborigines and New Zealand Maori. Wherever he went, Dr. Price found that beautiful straight teeth, freedom from decay, good physiques, resistance to disease and fine characters were typical of native groups on their traditional diets, rich in essential nutrients.

When Dr. Price analyzed the foods used by isolated peoples he found that, in comparison to the American diet of his day, they provided at least four times the water-soluble vitamins, calcium and other minerals, and at least TEN times the fat-soluble vitamins, from animal foods such as butter, fish eggs, shellfish, organ meats, eggs and animal fats—the very cholesterol-rich foods now shunned by the American public as unhealthful. These healthy traditional peoples knew instinctively what scientists of Dr. Price’s day had recently discovered—that these fat-soluble vitamins, vitamins A and D, were vital to health because they acted as catalysts to mineral absorption and protein utilization. Without them, we cannot absorb minerals, no matter how abundant they may be in our food. Dr. Price discovered an additional fat-soluble nutrient, which he labeled Activator X, that is present in fish livers and shellfish, and organ meats and butter from cows eating rapidly growing green grass in the spring and fall. All indigenous groups had a source of Activator X, now thought to be vitamin K2, in their diets.
The isolated groups Dr. Price investigated understood the importance of preconceptual nutrition for both parents. Many tribes required a period of special feeding before conception, in which nutrient-dense animal foods were given to young men and women. These same foods were considered important for pregnant and lactating women and growing children. Price discovered them to be particularly rich in minerals and in the fat-soluble activators found only in animal fats.The isolated people Price photographed—with their fine bodies, ease of reproduction, emotional stability and freedom from degenerative ills—stand in sharp contrast to civilized moderns subsisting on the “displacing foods of modern commerce,” including sugar, white flour, […]

Read more at www.westonaprice.org

Why is eating large amounts of processed meat bad for your health? It comes down to the toxic additives and preservatives

Why is eating large amounts of processed meat bad for your health? It comes down to the toxic additives and preservatives

( Natural News ) The lean component of red meat is an excellent source of essential nutrients . According to a study published in the journal Nutrition & Dietetics , you can get vitamins B2, B3, B5, B6 and B12 from red meat, as well as minerals like iron, phosphorus, selenium and zinc. The lean component of red meat is also a great source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which offer significant benefits for your heart and brain. In addition, phytochemical analysis reveals that it is rich in endogenous antioxidants and bioactive components like taurine, carnitine, glutathione and creatine that support overall health.

But despite all of these nutritional benefits, eating large amounts of red meat is still considered unhealthy. This prompted a team of Spanish researchers to investigate why frequent consumption of red meat increases health risks . In their report, which appeared in the journal Food Science and Human Wellness , the researchers attributed its negative effects to the presence of “substances of safety concern” in various meat products. These harmful chemicals are linked to certain food additives and are generated when red meats are subjected to various types of processing. The dangerous chemicals in red and processed meats

According to numerous studies, there is a clear link between high intake of red and processed meats and an increased risk for heart disease, diabetes , cancer and premature death. Among these negative consequences, cancer is the most commonly associated with diets that include large portions of meat. (Related: RED MEAT and CANCER – more than just a “correlation” .)

In a 2015 report released by the World Health Organization , the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified all kinds of red meat (i.e., beef, veal, pork, lamb, mutton, horse and goat) as Group 2A, or probably carcinogenic to humans , and processed meats (e.g., fried, salted, cured, fermented or smoked) as Group 1, or carcinogenic to humans. The IARC based their classification on limited evidence from epidemiological studies for red meat and sufficient evidence for processed meats.

To further explore existing evidence, the Spanish researchers reviewed studies that focused on the carcinogenic compounds found in meat products and the mechanisms by which they are generated. They listed the following toxic chemicals as substances of safety concern in meats : N-nitrosamines — Also called N-nitroso compounds, these carcinogens are formed via the reaction between nitrite, a common food additive, and secondary amines, which are produced when the proteins in meat are degraded during cooking. Studies show that N-nitroso compounds can induce cancer in at least 40 animal species , including humans.

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) — PAHs are naturally occurring chemicals produced when coal, gas, wood or tobacco are burned . They also form in meats when meats are grilled or charred. According to studies, activated PAHs can induce multiple mutations in cancer genes that could result in tumor formation.

Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCAs) — Like PAHs, HCAs are formed when meats are cooked using high temperature methods like pan frying or grilling. When amino acids, sugars, creatine or creatinine are exposed to high heat (above 300 F), they produce HCAs. These carcinogens also cause DNA damage that can lead to the development of breast, colon, liver, skin, lung and prostate tumors.

Maillard reactions products (MRPs) — The Maillard reaction, also known as non-enzymatic browning , refers to the chemical reaction that occurs when foods are cooked at high temperatures. Studies show that frying meats promotes the formation of an MRP called acrylamide . This compound is broken down inside the body and forms glacidamide , which causes DNA mutations that can damage the nervous system and trigger cancer development.

Biogenic amines (BAs) — BAs are nitrogen-containing compounds found in fermented meats like sausages. They are produced through the decarboxylation of amino acids by fermentative bacteria . BAs are the precursors to carcinogenic N-nitrosamines ; when present at high levels in food, they can cause headaches, nausea, rashes and unwanted changes in blood pressure.

According to the Spanish researchers, knowledge of these substances and their generation routes is important as it facilitates the assessment of the safety of meat products. It could also help food scientists come up with ways to reduce or eliminate the presence of these substances of concern in meats , making them much safer sources of nutrition.

Sources include:

OnlineLibrary.Wiley.com 1

OnlineLibrary.Wiley.com 2

WHO.int

ScienceDirect.com 1

ScienceDirect.com 2

ScienceDirect.com 3

CDC.gov

Cancer.gov

Hindawi.com

NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov

Read more at www.naturalnews.com

Bone Marrow Custard

Bone Marrow Custard

Print post

My version is based off this recipe from Kasey Culinary Adventures . Learn about the benefits of bone marrow in one of our articles! Ingredients

5 lbs beef marrow bones, unsliced

1 cup of cream

3 egg yolks

3 whole eggs

1 Tbs vanilla extract

2 teaspoons honey or maple syrup — optional

½ teaspoon of sea salt

1 tablespoon of cinnamon, or to taste

Instructions

In bowl, combine marrow (try not to include the oil), 1 cup cream, 3 egg yolks, 3 whole eggs, 2 tsp honey or maple syrup (optional), cinnamon to taste, dash of sea salt. Blend all together.

Pour into custard cups or cake pans (I used 2, 5” cake pans) and place those in a water bath.

In oven preheated to 350°F, bake until center is set. My pans took 40 minutes. Turn off oven and open door, allowing water bath to cool.

Print post
Print post

Learn about the meaning behind our logo above.

This is a Web version of 28-page printed informational 28-page printed informational booklet . You may order printed copies via our Store.

The Weston A. Price Foundation only accepts contributions from members and/or private donations, and does not accept funds from the meat or dairy industries. Life in all its splendor is Mother Nature obeyed. – Weston A. Price, DDS

Contents

About Dr. Weston A. Price
Characteristics of Traditional Diets – 11 Principles
Dietary Guidelines
Dietary Dangers
Confused about Fats?
The Many Roles of Saturated Fats
The Fat-Soluble Activators
What’s Wrong With “Politically Correct” Nutrition?
Traditional vs. Modern Diets
Myths and Truths About Nutrition
Myths and Truths About Soy
Soy Infant Formula: Birth Control Pills for Babies Coronary Heart Disease: What the Expert Say Principles of Holistic Dentistry The Weston A. Price Foundation Become a Member of the Weston A. Price Foundation About Dr. Weston A. Price In the early 1930s, a Cleveland dentist named Weston A. Price (1870-1948) began a series of unique investigations. His portrait on the left is provided courtesy of the Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation who owns the copyright.For over ten years, he traveled to isolated parts of the globe to study the health of populations untouched by western civilization. His goal was to discover the factors responsible for good dental health. His studies revealed that dental caries and deformed dental arches resulting in crowded, crooked teeth are the result of nutritional deficiencies, not inherited genetic defects. The groups Price studied included remote villages in Switzerland, Gaelic communities in the Outer Hebrides, indigenous peoples of North and South America, Melanesian and Polynesian South Sea Islanders, African tribes, Australian Aborigines and New Zealand Maori. Wherever he went, Dr. Price found that beautiful straight teeth, freedom from decay, good physiques, resistance to disease and fine characters were typical of native groups on their traditional diets, rich in essential nutrients.When Dr. Price analyzed the foods used by isolated peoples he found that, in comparison to the American diet of his day, they provided at least four times the water-soluble vitamins, calcium and other minerals, and at least TEN times the fat-soluble vitamins, from animal foods such as butter, fish eggs, shellfish, organ meats, eggs and animal fats—the very cholesterol-rich foods now shunned by the American public as unhealthful. These healthy traditional peoples knew instinctively what scientists of Dr. Price’s day had recently discovered—that these fat-soluble vitamins, vitamins A and D, were vital to health because they acted as catalysts to mineral absorption and protein utilization. Without them, we cannot absorb minerals, no matter how abundant they may be in our food. Dr. Price discovered an additional fat-soluble nutrient, which he labeled Activator X, that is present in fish livers and shellfish, and organ meats and butter from cows eating rapidly growing green grass in the spring and fall. All indigenous groups had a source of Activator X, now thought to be vitamin K2, in their diets.The isolated groups Dr. Price investigated understood the importance of preconceptual nutrition for both parents. Many tribes required a period of special feeding before conception, in which nutrient-dense animal foods were given to young men and women. These same foods were considered important for pregnant and lactating women and growing children. Price discovered them to be particularly rich in minerals and in the fat-soluble activators found only in animal fats.The isolated people Price photographed—with their fine bodies, ease of reproduction, emotional stability and freedom from degenerative ills—stand in sharp contrast to civilized moderns subsisting on the “displacing foods of modern commerce,” including sugar, white flour, pasteurized milk, lowfat foods, vegetable oils and convenience items filled with extenders and additives.The discoveries and conclusions of Dr. Price are presented in his classic volume, Nutrition and Physical Degeneration. The book contains striking photographs of handsome, healthy, indigenous people that illustrate in an unforgettable way the physical degeneration that occurs when human groups abandon nourishing traditional diets in favor of modern convenience foods.The photographs Dr. Weston Price took illustrate the difference in facial structure between those on native diets and those whose parents had adopted the “civilized” diets of devitalized processed foods. The “primitive” Seminoles pictured on the left have wide, attractive faces with plenty of room for the dental arches. The “modernized” Seminole girl on the right, born to parents who had abandoned their traditional diets, has a narrowed face, crowded teeth and a reduced immunity to disease. Photos courtesy of the Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation , who owns the copyrights. All rights reserved. Characteristics of Traditional Diets – 11 Principles> The diets of healthy, nonindustrialized peoples contain no refined or denatured foods or ingredients, such as refined sugar or high fructose corn syrup; white flour; canned foods; pasteurized, homogenized, skim or lowfat milk; refined or hydrogenated vegetable oils; protein powders; synthetic vitamins; or toxic additives and artificial colorings. All traditional cultures consume some sort of animal food, such as fish and shellfish; land and water fowl; land and sea mammals; […]

Read more at www.westonaprice.org

Mexico City sinking at “unstoppable rate” of up to 20 inches a year, study finds

Mexico City sinking at “unstoppable rate” of up to 20 inches a year, study finds

( Natural News ) A recent study found that Mexico City is sinking at a rate of up to 20 inches per year . Researchers explained that this unstoppable plunge occurs because the ground on which the city rests is rapidly compacting after being drained of water by decades of groundwater extraction.

The Metropolitan Area of the Valley of Mexico is built on what was once Lake Texcoco, home of the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan. Also called the Greater Mexico City, the crowded metropolis encompasses Mexico City and other surrounding areas. It obtains more than three-quarters of its drinking water from beneath the ground. But water extraction in the region dates back several centuries, beginning during colonial Mexico .

This long-term pumping pushed the groundwater further underground, drying the lake bed so much that clay sheets began to crack and compress. With the earth repacking itself more tightly, the ground started to shrink and subside.

Authorities first noticed that Greater Mexico City was sinking in 1900 when the metro was sliding at a rate of around 3.5 inches a year. When the government placed a cap on water extraction in the late 1950s, it was sinking 11 inches a year.

The cap slowed the rate of sinking back to 3.5 inches a year but failed to eradicate the problem. In the years since, land subsidence worsened as the metro’s population ballooned to 21 million and urbanization increased exponentially.

The study, which was published March in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth , showed that parts of the city, including the historic downtown in Mexico City, are now sinking up to 16 inches a year. In the underdeveloped northeast, the ground is dipping 20 inches a year. If the northeast were to become more industrialized, land subsidence would get even worse. (Related: The San Joaquin Valley is rapidly sinking due to groundwater extraction… some areas have fallen 28 feet… and it’s accelerating .)

The aquifer system beneath the metro was 17 percent compacted as of 2020. After analyzing more than a century of data, including recent satellite information, researchers predicted that the aquifer system would compact further to 30 percent, causing the metro to sink almost 100 feet in the next century.

The lost elevation is irreversible, leaving the region vulnerable to plenty of disasters. For one, subsidence makes the metro more prone to heavy flooding, which, in turn, can cause water shortages since floods can pollute the groundwater. Subsidence in the metro also fractures the ground , which previously damaged buildings, historical sites, sewers, and gas and water lines. This fracturing can also open up the earth to contaminated surface water, which can further restrict access to potable water.

“The stage is set for a dual water and subsidence crisis if no drastic water management actions are implemented,” the researchers concluded in their paper. What is land subsidence?

According to the U.S. Geological Survey , land subsidence occurs when large amounts of groundwater are withdrawn from certain types of rocks, such as fine-grained sediments. Rocks compact because groundwater is partly responsible for holding the ground up. When sufficient amounts of groundwater is withdrawn, rocks fall in on itself, causing the ground to sink.

Land subsidence affects more than 17,000 square miles in the U.S., or roughly the size of New Hampshire and Vermont combined. More than 80 percent of these sank due to the exploitation of groundwater, as well as the increased development of land and water resources.

California experiences the greatest losses in elevation among 45 states affected by land subsidence. In the San Joaquin Valley, some areas sank by as much as 28 feet since record-keeping began. Water pumping is intensive in the region, which is one of the most productive agricultural lands in the country. Over time, over-pumping dramatically reduced groundwater levels, drying out the aquifer system and causing it to compact.

Visit Environ.news to learn more about how human activities like intensive agriculture damage the environment.

Sources include:

EOS.org

USGS.gov 1

( Natural News ) Researchers at the University of Washington found that cadmium exposure, combined with a genetic predisposition to Alzheimer’s disease, might accelerate cognitive decline. The researchers arrived at this finding after exposing mice with an Alzheimer’s risk gene to cadmium. They detailed their findings in a paper published in the journal Toxicological Sciences . The effects of cadmium plus an Alzheimer’s risk gene

The so-called human apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene codes for a protein called apolipoprotein. This combines with fats to form lipoproteins, which carry cholesterol through the bloodstream. The APOE4 gene is a variant of the APOE gene. It significantly raises a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s , which is why it is considered an Alzheimer’s risk gene.

For their study, the researchers wanted to know how being carrier of this gene, combined with exposure to cadmium, affects cognition. Cadmium is a heavy metal that is extremely toxic to the brain. It occurs naturally and is extracted during the production of copper, lead and zinc. Cigarette smoke and polluted air also contain this toxin.

Over a period of 14 weeks, the researchers gave a group of mice with the APOE4 or the APOE3 gene water that contained low doses of cadmium. APOE3 is another variant of the APOE gene. It is widespread, with around half of the population carrying it.

The maximum amount of cadmium that the mice ingested was equivalent to the amount that Americans have in their blood, including people who never smoked .

As part of their experiment, the researchers put the rats through standard novel object location tests and T-maze tests, both of which engage the hippocampus, a region of the brain that is crucial for learning and memory. The hippocampus is one of the brain areas that is damaged the most during the early stages of Alzheimer’s.

The mice that ingested cadmium performed worse in the novel object location tests than untreated mice, indicating poorer short-term spatial working memory. This deficit in memory appeared earlier in mice with the APOE4 gene than those with APOE3, and earlier […]

Read more at www.naturalnews.com

Animal study reveals cadmium exposure and Alzheimer’s risk gene may be linked to cognitive impairment

Animal study reveals cadmium exposure and Alzheimer’s risk gene may be linked to cognitive impairment

( Natural News ) Researchers at the University of Washington found that cadmium exposure, combined with a genetic predisposition to Alzheimer’s disease, might accelerate cognitive decline. The researchers arrived at this finding after exposing mice with an Alzheimer’s risk gene to cadmium. They detailed their findings in a paper published in the journal Toxicological Sciences . The effects of cadmium plus an Alzheimer’s risk gene

The so-called human apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene codes for a protein called apolipoprotein. This combines with fats to form lipoproteins, which carry cholesterol through the bloodstream. The APOE4 gene is a variant of the APOE gene. It significantly raises a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s , which is why it is considered an Alzheimer’s risk gene.

For their study, the researchers wanted to know how being carrier of this gene, combined with exposure to cadmium, affects cognition. Cadmium is a heavy metal that is extremely toxic to the brain. It occurs naturally and is extracted during the production of copper, lead and zinc. Cigarette smoke and polluted air also contain this toxin.

Over a period of 14 weeks, the researchers gave a group of mice with the APOE4 or the APOE3 gene water that contained low doses of cadmium. APOE3 is another variant of the APOE gene. It is widespread, with around half of the population carrying it.

The maximum amount of cadmium that the mice ingested was equivalent to the amount that Americans have in their blood, including people who never smoked .

As part of their experiment, the researchers put the rats through standard novel object location tests and T-maze tests, both of which engage the hippocampus, a region of the brain that is crucial for learning and memory. The hippocampus is one of the brain areas that is damaged the most during the early stages of Alzheimer’s.

The mice that ingested cadmium performed worse in the novel object location tests than untreated mice, indicating poorer short-term spatial working memory. This deficit in memory appeared earlier in mice with the APOE4 gene than those with APOE3, and earlier in males than females with the same genetic makeup.

Later in life, mice with the APOE4 gene performed worse in the T-maze test than those with APOE3. This indicated a reduced tendency to explore new environments and therefore poorer short-term spatial working memory. In addition, the researchers found that cadmium exposure negatively impacts nerve cell development in the hippocampus of male mice with the APOE4 gene. Cadmium pools in the brain due to Alzheimer’s risk gene

These findings led the researchers to conclude that interactions between the APOE4 gene and cadmium accelerates cognitive decline, with young male mice being more susceptible to this effect than young females. The researchers pointed to impaired nerve cell development in the hippocampus as one of the underlying mechanisms, which possibly occurs because the APOE4 gene lets cadmium into the brain.

“It is possible that APOE4 may cause leakage on the blood-brain barrier and lead to a higher degree of cadmium accumulation in the APOE4 brain,” the researchers wrote. (Related: Cadmium could have adverse effects on brain development, reducing neurogenesis .)

Zhengui Xia, a professor of toxicology at Washington University and one of the study’s researchers, commented: “Exposure to cadmium through our daily lives could have a detrimental effect on our cognition. If you have the APOE4 gene, the risk is significantly higher.”

“This heavy metal is bad for you,” she added.

Follow HeavyMetals.news to learn more about the health risks of cadmium and other heavy metals.

Sources include:

Academic.OUP.com

Read more at www.naturalnews.com