Five so-called “conspiracy theories” that are actually supported by mainstream science

Five so-called “conspiracy theories” that are actually supported by mainstream science

( Natural News ) Telling the truth about a scandal that hasn’t been approved by the legacy media and their owners often yields a predictable result: You’ll be labeled a conspiracy theorist — even when there is plenty of evidence to support the truth. Comfortable lies may help some people sleep at night, but the truth is that many supposed “conspiracy theories” are actually real, and are supported by science . Who would have thought? Here are five truths that are widely misrepresented as conspiracy theories, and the evidence which supports them: 1. Atrazine disrupts, damages the endocrine system Atrazine is on the fast-track to becoming one of the most widely used pesticides in the United States. And because of this, there is a high amount of it in groundwater. It is consistently detected in public water supplies — which in and of itself is really quite concerning. But when the profound potential for this toxic chemical to spur endocrine disruption is taken into account, atrazine becomes downright frightening . Research led by Dr. Tyrone Hayes, a scientist from the University of California at Berkeley, has shown that in frogs, atrazine is capable of causing lasting endocrine damage. In males, the disruption to endocrine function can be so severe that it results in chemical castration. In one study, Hayes exposed 40 tadpoles to water tainted with atrazine, at a concentration of 2.5 parts per billion — well within the EPA’s allotment for drinking water. Nearly one-tenth of the tadpoles that were reared in the atrazine-laden water became “functionally female,” according to Hayes. Despite reportedly being born male, they ended up producing eggs. Support our mission and enhance your own self-reliance : The laboratory-verified Organic Emergency Survival Bucket provides certified organic, high-nutrition storable food for emergency preparedness. Completely free of […]

Koios Launches New Instant Mix Powder and Capsule Line

Koios Launches New Instant Mix Powder and Capsule Line

Koios Beverage Corp. (CSE: KBEV; OTC: SNOVF) (the “Company” or “Koios”), is pleased to announce a new line of nootropic products today, including a nutritional instant mix powder and daily-use capsule. The addition of these new products enables Koios to reach a broader audience and target a whole new demographic of customers. Powerful powder part of new products launched today by Koios. (CNW Group/Koios) “The powdered version of our supplement was a chance to really push the envelope from an ingredient stand point,” said Chris Miller, CEO and Director. “We wanted to pack more nutrients and nootropics into one product than any of our competition, while creating some of the better-flavoured supplements on the market.” The powder is for advanced nootropic users or someone looking for stronger and more intense cognitive benefits than what is found in the line of ready-to-drink products. The new line of capsules uses the same winning formula as the Company’s low-calorie, nutritionally-dense beverages, giving consumers the option of absorbing the active ingredients in capsule-form while on the go. “Our powders and newly formulated capsules are the result of years of trial-and-error and trying to pack the most value and science we could into one supplement,” said Miller. “These products are in line with our mission: To give people access to a healthier alternative to energy drinks, caffeine and unnatural ingredients. The new line of powder flavours include Grape Bliss, BlueBerry Lemonade and Sour Apple. About the Company’s Business The Company, through its wholly-owned subsidiary Koios, Inc., is an emerging functional beverage company which has an available distribution network of more than 2,000 retail locations across the United States in which to sell its products. Koios has relationships with some of the largest and most reputable distributors in the United States, including Europa Sports, Muscle […]

Debunking the metabolism excuse: Nutritionists say that metabolic rate doesn’t vary much from person to person…stop blaming your metabolism for your weight

Debunking the metabolism excuse: Nutritionists say that metabolic rate doesn’t vary much from person to person…stop blaming your metabolism for your weight

( Natural News ) If you’re not into physical activities or don’t like regularly going to the gym, you’ve probably used the line “I can’t lose weight like other people do because of my metabolism” one too many times as an excuse. But did you know that our metabolic rates aren’t that different after all ? The U.K.’s National Health Service defines metabolism as “all of the chemical processes that go on inside your body to keep you alive.” These various processes need energy, with about 70 percent of the energy being allocated to some of the very basic processes that keep us alive, regardless of our activity levels. This is called the basal metabolic rate (BMR). Think of metabolism as the body’s ability to turn the food you eat into energy that powers different processes in the body. Researchers have two different methods of measuring basal metabolic rate. First is by measuring the heat the body exudes, and second is by monitoring the levels of carbon dioxide you exhale. But is there a way to determine if people have a “fast” metabolic rate or a “slow” one? Dr. Thomas Barber, an associate professor and honorary consultant endocrinologist at the University of Warwick and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire in England, said that while individuals have different metabolic rates, in general, our metabolism per unit or kilogram of lean mass “is remarkably constant across the population.” Dr. Barber added that most of the metabolism occurs in all the lean tissue in the body or everything that’s not fat. Take note that aside from the muscles, lean mass includes organs like the brain, kidneys, and the liver. When discussing rate in “lean mass, people are fairly similar across the board.” Sponsored solution from CWC Labs: This heavy metals test kit […]

How many steps a day does it take to keep your brain young?

How many steps a day does it take to keep your brain young?

I’ve known for some time that a sedentary lifestyle is not the best way to age well. I know that getting outside for a walk each day will help me stay trim, keep my bones strong, manage my high blood pressure and prevent heart disease and diabetes. I haven’t always acted on this knowledge. Until now. I fear Alzheimer’s and memory loss just as much or more than I fear other health conditions. I’m betting you do, too. When I read the two pieces of research I’m about to share with you, I promised myself I’d start walking daily. I’ve been true to my word. I hope you will be, too. Every footstep sends oxygen to the brain We know that a good, brisk walk can improve your mood, get the blood flowing and help you concentrate better. But there’s more to it than that. Two studies released last year show that, in fact, every step we take actually results in physical changes to the brain that improve our ability to hold on to memories and use them when we need them. A team of researchers at New Mexico Highlands University discovered something seemingly simple, yet vitally important about walking and our brain. They found that the foot’s impact during walking sends pressure waves through the arteries that increase blood supply to the brain. With increased blood flow comes more oxygen to support the brain areas responsible for memory and cognition. Not only that: the researchers found that when we walk briskly, our stride rate (number of steps per minute) and heart rate tend to fall into sync, revealing the vital connection between the two. More steps = a bigger brain, better memory The second important study comes from the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at the […]

Heal your thyroid with dandelion… and 9 other powerful tonics to try

Heal your thyroid with dandelion… and 9 other powerful tonics to try

( Natural News ) The thyroid is an important gland that is responsible for a lot of functions in the body. If it is over- or under-functioning, you might experience symptoms, such as brain fog, a slower metabolism, fatigue, and even depression. Here are some tonics and teas that you can brew up to improve thyroid health : Dandelion – Dandelions have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties which help calm the autoimmune flares and balance out the immune system. To make dandelion tea, you need two teaspoons of dried dandelion root and leaves. Then, steep it with fresh lemon zest in a tea infuser for 15 to 20 minutes. Add half a teaspoon of raw honey, stir, and drink. Siberian ginseng – As an adaptogenic herb, Siberian ginseng can help the body handle stress better, like the stress caused by a thyroid problem. Additionally, it can help reduce inflammation commonly found in thyroid problems. The dried root of this herb can be brewed and paired with orange peel or zest. Siberian ginseng requires a longer cooking time, about two to three hours, to extract the herbal benefits. Chaga – Chaga provides liver and lymph cleansing benefits. It also removes toxins and nourishes the detox system, which is beneficial for a thyroid-sluggish body. It also has mind-clearing benefits which can clear away thyroid brain fog. Chaga can be mixed in a smoothie or be made into a matcha-like tea drink. Ashwagandha – This herb can help the body cope better with stress, anxiety, and other chronic health conditions. Moreover, it can help improve the production of thyroid hormone. You can take ashwagandha by mixing it with warm coconut or almond milk. Turmeric – Turmeric is a nourishing food for thyroid health because of its active ingredient, curcumin. It provides anti-inflammatory properties […]

How Brain Stimulation Can Boost Memory If Paired With Learning

How Brain Stimulation Can Boost Memory If Paired With Learning

In 47 CE, Scribonius Largus, court physician to the Roman emperor Claudius, described in his Compositiones a method for treating chronic migraines: place torpedo fish on the scalps of patients to ease their pain with electric shocks. Largus was on the right path; our brains are comprised of electrical signals that influence how brain cells communicate with each other and in turn affect cognitive processes such as memory, emotion and attention. The science of brain stimulation —altering electrical signals in the brain—has, needless to say, changed in the past 2,000 years. Today we have a handful of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) devices that deliver constant, low current to specific regions of the brain through electrodes on the scalp, for users ranging from online video-gamers to professional athletes and people with depression. Yet cognitive neuroscientists are still working to understand just how much we can influence brain signals and improve cognition with these techniques. Brain stimulation by tDCS is non-invasive and inexpensive. Some scientists think it increases the likelihood that neurons will fire, altering neural connections and potentially improving the cognitive skills associated with specific brain regions. Neural networks associated with attention control can be targeted to improve focus in people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Or people who have a hard time remembering shopping lists and phone numbers might like to target brain areas associated with short-term (also known as working) memory in order to enhance this cognitive process. However, the effects of tDCS are inconclusive across a wide body of peer-reviewed studies, particularly after a single session. In fact, some experts question whether enough electrical stimulation from the technique is passing through the scalp into the brain to alter connections between brain cells at all. Notably, the neuroscientist György Buzsáki at New York University presented research […]

Sulbutiamine (Arcalion) Benefits + Dosage, Reviews, Side Effects

Sulbutiamine (Arcalion) Benefits + Dosage, Reviews, Side Effects

Sulbutiamine is a fat-soluble derivative of thiamine . It is considered a nootropic and antioxidant and is used in France to reduce fatigue . It also stimulates gut activity, improves muscle weakness, boosts memory, and protects the brain. Keep on reading to learn more about the health benefits of sulbutiamine, dosage, and possible side effects. Japanese scientists developed sulbutiamine in the 60s while exploring treatments for thiamine deficiency. Some brand names for this compound are Enerion and Arcalion [ R ]. Sulbutiamine is synthetically produced and is made by binding 2 vitamin B1 molecules together . Sulbutiamine is more fat soluble than thiamine, allowing it to pass to the brain easier (cross the blood-brain barrier) [ R ]. Sulbutiamine increases thiamine in the brain more than other forms of thiamine [ R , R ]. Increases thiamine (and thiamine derivative) levels more than thiamine itself [ R ] Increases dopamine (D1) and glutamate activity in decision-making regions of the brain (such as the prefrontal cortex) [ R , R ] Increases energy use in the brain (by increasing thiamine triphosphate) [ R ] 1) Sulbutiamine Boosts Energy In a study of 1,772 patients (non-randomised) with infections and chronic fatigue, sulbutiamine (200mg twice a day) for two weeks (along with anti-infective treatment) helped with low energy. Fifty-two percent of the patients felt a significant boost in mood and energy [ R ]. 326 patients with chronic fatigue (post-infection) were treated with sulbutiamine and a placebo (DB-RCT). Some individuals felt an energy boost from sulbutiamine, but the results were not significant [ R ]. Sulbutiamine boosted energy in 341 patients (observational study) with chronic fatigue diagnosed as asthenia (measured with a 44% decrease in their Fatigue Intensity Scores) [ R ]. Additionally, sulbutiamine treatment (400 mg daily for 1 month) greatly […]

The Nonalcoholic Beverage Market is Projected to Grow

The Nonalcoholic Beverage Market is Projected to Grow

According to data published by Allied Market Research, the non-alcoholic drinks market size is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 4.4% to reach $2,090 billion by 2022. The research attributes the projections to ongoing advancements in the nonalcoholic drinks market with innovative efforts have further enhanced their demand. The report also indicates that recent innovations, which embed functional benefits and natural or organic ingredients in manufacturing of drinks is anticipated to enable the market to reach to a wider segment of audiences. Market segments such as energy drinks, sport drinks, and hot drinks are expected to witness good growth in the near future. Koios Beverage Corp. (CSE: KBEV), The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO), SodaStream International Ltd. (NASDAQ: SODA), PepsiCo, Inc. (NASDAQ: PEP), Cott Corporation (NYSE: COT ) Health and wellness have significantly posed positive impact on the food and beverages industry in recent years. Increase in awareness of various health problems associated with alcohol has shifted the consumer preference from alcoholic drinks towards healthy, often organic nonalcoholic drinks. According to Future Market Insights, “Functional beverages are non-alcoholic drinks that keeps one’s body hydrated and provide overall nutritional well-being. These are fortified drinks that prevent or help address health issues across all age groups… Energy drinks is the largest segment in functional beverages followed by sports drinks and nutraceutical drinks… North America is the largest market for functional beverages as it contains innovative varieties of drinks that are customized for all age groups and strata.” Koios Beverage Corp. (CSE: KBEV) listed on the Canadian Securities Exchange, earlier in the week the company announced that, “Koios Beverage Corp. (CSE: KBEV)…is pleased to announce that further to its news release on April 13, 2018, the Company’s common shares will resume trading on the Canadian Securities Exchange (the “CSE”) under the symbol […]

3 Foods That Will Instantly Improve Your Mood (Not In The Stress-Eating Kind Of Way)

3 Foods That Will Instantly Improve Your Mood (Not In The Stress-Eating Kind Of Way)

Anchovy toast Experts call the stomach your "second brain" for a reason: There’s a little world of neurons hanging out in there, ready to fire off feel-good messages straight to your head. Get them going with eat-the-rainbow meals designed to energize, calm, or boost your mood. MARCUS NILSSON This salad will prep you for anything. It’s teeming with wild shrimp (low in cals, big in protein and iron to get you pumped), crunchy apples (for an all-natural sugar rush), and spicy peppers (loaded with capsaicins, compounds that stimulate the release of endorphins—the same chemicals that create a runner’s high!). MARCUS NILSSON There are mind-blowing numbers of avo toast on insta. But if you’re after mind-sharpening, crown that crusty bread with anchovies. Yep, anchovies. These savory swimmers (boasting umami-rich flavor) are packed with omega-3 fatty acids, which can fuel your mind and enhance a positive mood. Top it off with multihued carrots—the more colors, the greater the range of vitamins—to get your fill of memory-improving flavonoids. MARCUS NILSSON Brownies. The word alone conjures good moods. Chocolate itself decreases cortisol levels, but this batch eclipses the classic. One: it’s baked with sweet potatoes, which contain muscle-relaxing potassium and fiber, so you feel full faster. Two: Black beans are high in magnesium, which regulates the nervous system to help tame anxiety. This article originally appeared in the May 2018 issue of Women’s Health. For more great ideas, pick up a copy on newsstands now!

5 Simple Ways To Boost Our Intelligence

5 Simple Ways To Boost Our Intelligence

by Sabrina Stierwalt, PhD: Popular media is full of suggestions on how to improve our brain health and cognition. But can we really boost our intelligence? The ‘selfish brain’ theory of evolution describes our brains as taking the energy it needs, typically in the form of glucose, before doling out what remains to the rest of the body. In other words, the brain selfishly prioritizes its own needs which are comparably high. A recent study from the University of Cambridge put this theory to the test by challenging elite rowers to perform a memory task and a physical rowing task, first separately and then at the same time. Performance in both the memory-related and the physical tasks decreased when the students attempted to accomplish them simultaneously, but their rowing suffered far more than their ability to recall words for the memory task. On average, the participants showed a 30% greater drop in their physical strength than in their cognitive abilities , suggesting the brain does in fact take what it needs first when resources become scarce. Although the selfish brain theory has been proposed as a possible origin for physical issues like obesity, it may also push back against the idea that we are stuck with an innate level of intelligence. If we can count on our brains to demand our body’s limited resources, can we also count on them to continue to improve even once we’re done growing in adulthood? A common brain myth is that we only use 10% of our brain . I have certainly heard this statistic and a study from only a few years ago showed that as many as 65% of Americans believe it to be true. However, neurologists at the Mayo Clinic note that throughout the course of the day, we use […]