Discovery of a gene that could reduce brain damage in newborns

Discovery of a gene that could reduce brain damage in newborns

Associate professor Johanne Egge Rinholm and research fellow Lauritz Kennedy. Credit: Kyrre Vigestad, UiO The most common cause of death or disabilities in newborn babies is what is called hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. This arises when the supply of blood and oxygen to the brain is blocked for a period of time.

“The lack of blood and nutrients causes brain cells to die. These babies can then suffer from neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy ,” says researcher and associate professor Johanne Egge Rinholm.

Rinholm and her team at the Institute of Basic Medical Sciences at the University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital have made a promising discovery regarding the future treatment of these babies. In a study, newly published in eLife , they describe their experiments with a receptor called HCAR1 on mice . A receptor is a protein that triggers a response inside a cell. Their findings indicate that the HCAR1 receptor helps to repair brain damage.

Mice lacking the HCAR1 gene formed few new cells following brain damage

The researchers used a group of newborn mice whose HCAR1 gene had been removed, and another control group of “normal” mice.

“Whereas brain tissue in the ‘normal’ mice was partly restored during the 42 days following the brain damage, the brains of mice lacking HCAR1 showed little sign of repair. In addition, we found that the mice in the control group produced new cells that could help to repopulate the injured areas of their brain. In contrast, the mice without HCAR1 showed little regeneration of cells,” research fellows Lauritz Kennedy and Emilie Rylund Glesaaen explain.

Scientists must find out whether they can achieve a similar effect in humans

According to Rinholm, their data suggest that HCAR1 is an important factor in the repair of brain tissue following hypoxic-ischemic injury in newborn mice.

The treatment currently used in humans is to cool the babies down.

“Nevertheless, many of these babies continue to suffer from long-term brain damage . So new drugs are needed that can protect the brain and help to generate new brain cells,” says Rinholm.

She emphasizes that further studies are necessary in order to find out whether HCAR1 has a similar, beneficial effect in humans.

Lactic acid provides cells with energy and works with the HCAR1 gene

The scientists were keen to study the receptor because of its connection with lactic acid . Lactic acid, or its less acidic form lactate, is produced by your muscles when you do strenuous exercise. But lactate is also produced in the brain.

“Experiments on mice indicate that injections of extra lactate can improve rehabilitation after a brain injury. But the reason for this has been unclear up until now. In much the same way as sugar, lactate can provide cells with metabolic energy. But recent research shows that lactate can also function as a signaling molecule which helps to transmit information from the surroundings to cells or between cells. This occurs when lactate binds to the HCAR1 receptor we have been researching. However, the positive role played by HCAR1 in the brain was not well understood,” says Rinholm.

Provided by University of Oslo

Read more at medicalxpress.com

The researchers created brain organoids — brain-like structures grown from human induced pluripotent stem cells — to investigate the effects of LSD at the cellular level. They found that LSD affected several processes, including DNA replication, neural pathfinding, and mTOR signaling.

The researchers created brain organoids — brain-like structures grown from human induced pluripotent stem cells — to investigate the effects of LSD at the cellular level. They found that LSD affected several processes, including DNA replication, neural pathfinding, and mTOR signaling.

New research published in Experimental Neurology provides some initial evidence that the psychedelic substance known as LSD has nootropic properties. The study found that LSD increased markers of neuroplasticity in human brain organoids, increased novelty preference in rats, and improved memory performance in humans.

When combined with psychotherapy, psychedelic drugs have shown promise in the treatment of psychiatric conditions such as depression, PTSD, and addiction. But the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effects of psychedelics remains unclear.

Some research has indicated that psychedelic substances produce positive impacts, in part, because they promote neurogenesis and neuroplasticity. The authors of the new study were interested in better understanding whether the neuroplasticity induced by psychedelics could be harnessed to enhance learning and memory.

“My main research topics are the neural plasticity mechanisms underlying the cognitive benefits of sleep and dreaming. In the past decade I became interested in psychedelics because they produce dream-like states with major cognitive impacts,” said study author Sidarta Ribeiro, a full professor of neuroscience at the Brain Institute of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte

The researchers created brain organoids — brain-like structures grown from human induced pluripotent stem cells — to investigate the effects of LSD at the cellular level. They found that LSD affected several processes, including DNA replication, neural pathfinding, and mTOR signaling.

“The proteomic data from human brain organoids suggest that LSD regulates multiple processes involved in neural plasticity,” the researchers said. “Notably, we found significant LSD-induced changes in the mTOR pathway, a protein kinase involved in multiple neural plasticity events, acting as a hub between plasticity, learning, and memory.”

To examine the effects of LSD on hippocampus-dependent memory processes, the researchers had 76 rats undergo a novel object preference task several days after receiving a dose of LSD or an inert saline solution. Rats who had received LSD tended to spend more time exploring novel objects. But LSD did not appear to affect the overall time spent exploring objects in general.

“Our results show that LSD pre-treatment can substantially increase novelty preference in rats several days after dosing, with a significant single dose effect,” the researchers said. “The results imply that LSD-induced plasticity enhanced novelty-seeking.”

Ribeiro and his research team also investigated the effects of LSD on humans in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. In the cross-over study, 25 healthy volunteers who had previously used LSD at least once (but had been abstinent from any psychedelic or other illicit drugs for at least two weeks) received 50 μg of LSD in one session and 50 μg of an inactive placebo in another session. The order of the sessions was randomized.

The morning after dosing, the participants completed a visuospatial 2D object-location task (an assessment of memory consolidation) and a Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure test (a commonly used neuropsychological assessment of memory encoding and recall in which participants are asked to reproduce a complicated line drawing).

The researchers found that participants tended to have better performance on the memory tests the day after consuming LSD, compared to the day after consuming the placebo. “To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that LSD enhances subacute memory in humans,” the authors wrote in their study. However, they noted that the effects of LSD were not very strong, which might be a result of “the single, relatively low dose applied.”

Together, the findings provide evidence that “even a single dose of LSD can promote neural plasticity and enhance cognition in healthy adults, several days after the LSD administration,” Ribeiro told PsyPost. However, the researcher noted that “we still need to learn more about age differences, potential gender differences and the role of the context (setting) in the modulation of the effects.”

“Psychedelics have been demonized since the 1960s, and in the past decade they have returned to biology and medicine through the front door,” Ribeiro added. “However, the utility of psychedelics is not restricted to the treatment of patients with a pathological condition. They can also be very useful to improve the cognition of healthy individuals, i.e., they should be seen not just as medicine, but also as part of human life at large.”

The study, “Nootropic effects of LSD: Behavioral, molecular and computational evidence“, was authored by Isis M. Ornelasa, Felipe A. Cini, Isabel Wießner, Encarni Marcos, Dráulio B. Araújo,Livia Goto-Silva, Juliana Nascimento, Sergio R. B. Silva, Marcelo N. Costa, Marcelo Falchic, Rodolfo Olivieri, Fernanda Palhano-Fontes, Eduardo Sequerra, Daniel Martins-de-Souza, Amanda Feilding, César Rennó-Costa, Luis Fernando Tófolic, Stevens K. Rehena, and Sidarta Ribeiro.

Read more at www.msn.com

Even simple exercise may help aging brain, study hints

Even simple exercise may help aging brain, study hints

High school students run at sunset as they practice for the track and field season in late February 2022 in Shawnee, Kansas. New research hints that even simple exercise just might help fend off memory problems. While physical activity helps keep healthy brains fit, it’s not clear how much it helps once memory starts to slide.
(AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

by LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer

New research hints that even a simple exercise routine just might help older Americans with mild memory problems.

Doctors have long advised physical activity to help keep a healthy brain fit. But the government-funded study marks the longest test of whether exercise makes any difference once memory starts to slide — research performed amid a pandemic that added isolation to the list of risks to participants’ brain health.

Researchers recruited about 300 sedentary older adults with hard-to-spot memory changes called mild cognitive impairment or MCI — a condition that’s sometimes, but not always, a precursor to Alzheimer’s. Half were assigned aerobic exercises and the rest stretching-and-balance moves that only modestly raised their heart rate.

Another key component: Participants in both groups were showered with attention by trainers who worked with them at YMCAs around the country — and when COVID-19 shut down gyms, helped them keep moving at home via video calls.

After a year, cognitive testing showed overall neither group had worsened, said lead researcher Laura Baker, a neuroscientist at Wake Forest School of Medicine. Nor did brain scans show the shrinkage that accompanies worsening memory problems, she said.

By comparison, similar MCI patients in another long-term study of brain health — but without exercise — experienced significant cognitive decline over a year.

Those early findings are surprising, and the National Institute on Aging cautioned that tracking non-exercisers in the same study would have offered better proof.

But the results suggest “this is doable for everybody” — not just seniors healthy enough to work up a hard sweat, said Baker, who presented the data Tuesday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference. “Exercise needs to be part of the prevention strategies” for at-risk seniors.

Previous research has found regular physical activity of any sort may reduce damaging inflammation and increase blood flow to the brain, said Alzheimer’s Association chief scientific officer Maria Carrillo.

But the new study is especially intriguing because the pandemic hit halfway through, leaving already vulnerable seniors socially isolated — something long known to increase people’s risk of memory problems, Carrillo said.

It’s a frustrating time for dementia research. Doctors are hesitant to prescribe a high-priced new drug called Aduhelm that was supposed to be the first to slow progression of Alzheimer’s — but it’s not yet clear if it really helps patients. Researchers last month reported another drug that works similarly — by targeting amyloid plaques that are an Alzheimer’s hallmark — failed in a key study.

While amyloid clearly plays a role, it’s important that drugmakers increasingly are targeting many other factors that can lead to dementia, Carrillo said, because effective treatment or prevention likely will require a combination of customized strategies.

One example of a new approach: Sometimes in dementia, the brain has trouble processing blood sugar and fats for the energy it needs, John Didsbury of T3D Therapeutics told the Alzheimer’s meeting. His company is testing a pill that aims to rev up that metabolism, with results expected next year.

Meanwhile, there’s growing urgency to settle whether steps people could take today — like exercise — might offer at least some protection.

How much and what kind of exercise? In Baker’s study, seniors were supposed to get moving for 30 to 45 minutes four times a week, whether it was on a vigorous turn on the treadmill or the stretching exercises. That’s a big ask of anyone who’s sedentary, but Baker said MCI’s effects on the brain make it even harder for people to plan and stick with the new activity.

Hence the social stimulation — which she credited with each participant completing over 100 hours of exercise. Baker suspects that sheer volume might explain why even the simple stretching added up to an apparent benefit. Participants were supposed to exercise without formal support for an additional six months, data Baker hasn’t yet analyzed.

“We wouldn’t have done the exercise on our own,” said retired agriculture researcher Doug Maxwell of Verona, Wisconsin, who joined the study with his wife.

The duo, both 81, were both assigned to the stretching classes. They felt so good afterward that when the study ended, they bought electric bikes in hopes of even more activity — efforts Maxwell acknowledged are hard to keep up.

Next up: Baker is leading an even larger study of older adults to see if adding exercise to other can’t-hurt steps such as a heart-healthy diet, brain games and social stimulation together may reduce the risk of dementia.

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Read more at bonnercountydailybee.com

Pure Neuro Reviews: Shocking Pure Life Organics Facts! You Must Read Before Order!

Pure Neuro Reviews: Shocking Pure Life Organics Facts! You Must Read Before Order!

Pure Neuro is a supplement that feeds the brain, improving memory retention and cognitive performance. Almost a dozen healthy, all-natural, and effective ingredients make up the remedy.

The brain changes multiple times during a person’s life. It is the driving force behind every activity, thought, and reaction in the body, yet the stress it faces on a daily basis may be overwhelming. The brain’s connections get progressively exhausted with time, making it more difficult to recall new knowledge and maintain clarity. Using a substance such as Pure Neuro from PureLife Organics may help to alleviate these symptoms and restore the mind.

Click Here to Get Pure Neuro For The Most Discounted Price

Ingredients

According to Dr. Capasso, this product includes a substance obtained from beehives that boosts the amount of brain power cells. Propolis is used extensively in the recipe.

It Propolis is used to stave against sickness in the hive. It is completely natural and works to decrease inflammation and regulate the immune system. Dr. Capasso believes that by reducing inflammation, this treatment might completely eliminate brain fog. The inclusion of this ingredient is based on studies from Ohio State University that claim that using it may minimize hospital admissions for inflammation by up to six days. It possesses anti-cancer qualities as well as antioxidant capabilities. In addition to reducing inflammation, Brazilian green propolis improved brain cell health and reduced oxidative stress.

Pure Neuro does not depend only on Brazilian green propolis. It also includes nine extra nutrients that help the brain function properly. The following are the remaining components:

● Curcumin

● Duchesnea Chrysanthemum

● Ginseng

● Glutathione

● Melatonin

● Mushrooms Reishi

● Selenium

● Zinc Vitamin C

The following are the effects of each of these elements on the brain and body:

Melatonin: It is the element that promotes sleep quality, but it also serves many other purposes. Melatonin use protects the brain’s barrier and lowers inflammation. It is safe and effective to use. However, current research suggests that its use may also be beneficial for patients suffering from brain injury. Even while the body makes enough melatonin for sleep, blue light from phones, laptops, and televisions suppresses its production. Customers who supplement with this antioxidant may improve their sleep quality and support brain health.

Glutathione: Glutathione is a natural antioxidant produced by the body. It attracts free radicals and toxins away from the blood-brain barrier. The body is depleted due to the frequent exposure that consumers have because of poor food, environmental contaminants, and drug use. Users may avoid damage to the blood-brain barrier by increasing glutathione levels.

Reishi Mushrooms: Reishi mushrooms are utilized to improve the immune system. These mushrooms may help with a variety of health conditions, including hypertension and high cholesterol levels. Regular use of these mushrooms decreases stress, promotes sleep, and alleviates fatigue. All of these illnesses are connected with brain aging. Taking mushrooms directly, on the other hand, will not have the same impact.

Curcumin: Curcumin is derived from turmeric. This natural molecule has been linked to a reduction in inflammation, which is one of Pure Neuro’s key purposes. It has been linked to improved heart health as well as protection against Alzheimer’s and cancer. It helps users reduce their risk of arthritis by acting as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory.

Selenium: Another neuroprotective antioxidant is selenium. It not only lowers the risk of some types of cancer but also protects against heart disease. It is included in this formula largely to reduce the risk of mental deterioration, but it is also necessary for thyroid health and immune system support.

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, promotes the healing of all physiological tissues. It is a necessary vitamin that aids the body in the production of collagen in the joints, hair, nails, and skin. Vitamin C boosts the immune system and speeds up the body’s capacity to heal wounds.

Ginseng: Ginseng not only lowers high blood sugar levels but also boosts energy levels and lowers the risk of cancer. One of the most important benefits of Pure Neuro for the brain is that it includes a powerful antioxidant that is primarily used to reduce inflammation. It also benefits the immune system.

Duchesnea Chrysantha: It has a high concentration of pentacyclic triterpenes. The ingredient aids in the elimination of chemicals that cause mitochondrial corrosion. This supplement is specifically designed to address mitochondrial corrosion. As a result, the presence of this flower is an excellent complement.

Zinc: Immune support is the primary role of zinc in almost all supplements. This barrier will repair more efficiently if the immune system uses its ability to eliminate internal damage and potential hazards. Zinc is the only element in this remedy that is necessary for the user’s daily health, although many other ingredients are also useful.

WorkingPure Neuro works by safeguarding the mitochondria, which are the body’s and health’s building components. Taking this tablet will protect them from typical weaknesses, and the benefits will make them feel much younger than they were before.To be successful, users must take the entire dosage (two capsules) every day. One container will last one month since each bottle includes 60 pills. Although it is useful when used alone, it is recommended that consumers take the capsules in the morning.As soon as they are digested, users will begin to feel their effects. Pure Neuro promotes brain clarity, memory, and focus greatly. They will no longer have brain fog after lengthy usage.BenefitsPure Neuro positively impacts the whole body and provides the following benefits:● The dietary supplement provides essential nutrients to the body. It reduces oxidative stress by removing contaminants and free radicals.● Pure Neuro protects brain cells from internal damage● It alleviates stress, reduces anxiety, and treats hypochondria and emotional weariness. The supplement improves cognitive abilities such as analytical thinking, learning new things, focusing, and so on.● Pure Neuro alleviates brain fog● It improves mood and helps to avoid mood swings.● The product targets the issue of insomnia.● It boosts motivation.Price of Pure NeuroDespite the fact that there are other nootropics on the market today, this combination is only accessible via the official website. […]

Read more at www.tribuneindia.com

Even simple exercise may help aging brain, study hints

Even simple exercise may help aging brain, study hints

High school students run at sunset as they practice for the track and field season Monday, Feb. 28, 2022, in Shawnee, Kan. New research hints that even simple… Read More New research hints that even a simple exercise routine just might help older Americans with mild memory problems.

Doctors have long advised physical activity to help keep a healthy brain fit. But the government-funded study marks the longest test of whether exercise makes any difference once memory starts to slide — research performed amid a pandemic that added isolation to the list of risks to participants’ brain health.

Researchers recruited about 300 sedentary older adults with hard-to-spot memory changes called mild cognitive impairment or MCI — a condition that’s sometimes, but not always, a precursor to Alzheimer’s. Half were assigned aerobic exercises and the rest stretching-and-balance moves that only modestly raised their heart rate.

Another key component: Participants in both groups were showered with attention by trainers who worked with them at YMCAs around the country — and when COVID-19 shut down gyms, helped them keep moving at home via video calls.

After a year, cognitive testing showed overall neither group had worsened, said lead researcher Laura Baker, a neuroscientist at Wake Forest School of Medicine. Nor did brain scans show the shrinkage that accompanies worsening memory problems, she said.

By comparison, similar MCI patients in another long-term study of brain health — but without exercise — experienced significant cognitive decline over a year.

Those early findings are surprising, and the National Institute on Aging cautioned that tracking non-exercisers in the same study would have offered better proof.

But the results suggest “this is doable for everybody” — not just seniors healthy enough to work up a hard sweat, said Baker, who presented the data Tuesday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference. ”Exercise needs to be part of the prevention strategies” for at-risk seniors.

Previous research has found regular physical activity of any sort may reduce damaging inflammation and increase blood flow to the brain, said Alzheimer’s Association chief scientific officer Maria Carrillo.

But the new study is especially intriguing because the pandemic hit halfway through, leaving already vulnerable seniors socially isolated — something long known to increase people’s risk of memory problems, Carrillo said.

It’s a frustrating time for dementia research. Doctors are hesitant to prescribe a high-priced new drug called Aduhelm that was supposed to be the first to slow progression of Alzheimer’s — but it’s not yet clear if it really helps patients. Researchers last month reported another drug that works similarly — by targeting amyloid plaques that are an Alzheimer’s hallmark — failed in a key study.

While amyloid clearly plays a role, it’s important that drugmakers increasingly are targeting many other factors that can lead to dementia, Carrillo said, because effective treatment or prevention likely will require a combination of customized strategies.

One example of a new approach: Sometimes in dementia, the brain has trouble processing blood sugar and fats for the energy it needs, John Didsbury of T3D Therapeutics told the Alzheimer’s meeting. His company is testing a pill that aims to rev up that metabolism, with results expected next year.

Meanwhile, there’s growing urgency to settle whether steps people could take today — like exercise — might offer at least some protection.

How much and what kind of exercise? In Baker’s study, seniors were supposed to get moving for 30 to 45 minutes four times a week, whether it was on a vigorous turn on the treadmill or the stretching exercises. That’s a big ask of anyone who’s sedentary, but Baker said MCI’s effects on the brain make it even harder for people to plan and stick with the new activity.

Hence the social stimulation — which she credited with each participant completing over 100 hours of exercise. Baker suspects that sheer volume might explain why even the simple stretching added up to an apparent benefit. Participants were supposed to exercise without formal support for an additional six months, data Baker hasn’t yet analyzed.

“We wouldn’t have done the exercise on our own,” said retired agriculture researcher Doug Maxwell of Verona, Wisconsin, who joined the study with his wife.

The duo, both 81, were both assigned to the stretching classes. They felt so good afterward that when the study ended, they bought electric bikes in hopes of even more activity — efforts Maxwell acknowledged are hard to keep up.

Next up: Baker is leading an even larger study of older adults to see if adding exercise to other can’t-hurt steps such as a heart-healthy diet, brain games and social stimulation together may reduce the risk of dementia.

Read more at www.binghamtonhomepage.com

Medicinal Mushrooms Benefits: What Does The Science Have To Say?

When we hear the word “ mushroom ,” we often think of the kind you cook with or use recreationally. But there’s another type – medicinal mushrooms – that are criminally underrated when you consider the amazing list of benefits they provide.

Part of what makes these mushrooms so great is their versatility. For example, you can find a chaga mushroom tincture or buy the mushrooms in whole or powdered form.

In this article, we’re going to look at five medicinal mushrooms and their proven health benefits.

Without further ado… Medicinal Mushrooms – 5 To Try Today For Incredible Benefits!

1. Chaga Mushroom

Many people, including David Wolfe, call chaga mushroom “The King of Mushrooms” – and there’s a good reason for that!

Chaga mushroom grows on birch trees in the northern hemisphere. To the untrained eye, chaga might look like a clump of dirt. Experts can spot it by looking for its orange tissue. ( 1 )

Chaga mushroom contains an incredible amount of nutrients. That includes ( 2 , 3 ): Potassium

Copper

Selenium

Zinc

Manganese

Calcium

Fiber

Vitamin D

B-complex vitamins

Fiber

Antioxidants

Research shows that chaga mushrooms help your body promote cytokines, which are proteins than regulate inflammation, bacteria and viruses. ( 4 , 5 )

Interestingly, there is also a host of studies that suggest chaga mushroom may slow cancer growth.

Further, one study in mice found that chaga supplements caused tumors to shrink by 60%. ( 6 )

In other research, scientists found that chaga extract reduced cancer growth in human liver, lung, breast, prostate, and colon cells. ( 7 , 8 , 9 , 10 )

Researchers believe that chaga’s potential anti-cancer capabilities are due to its antioxidant-richness. These antioxidants may also play a role in chaga’s ability to reduce your body’s “bad” LDL cholesterol levels. ( 11 ) 2. Reishi Mushroom

While many people call chaga “King of Mushrooms,” reishi mushroom has earned the nickname “Queen of Mushrooms.”

Reishi mushroom has been a staple of Chinese medicine for thousands of years – and for good reason.

It’s an adaptogenic herb, meaning it helps your body ward off negative side effects of stress. Like chaga mushroom, reishi contains powerful antioxidants that combat stress and may strengthen your defences against cancer.But perhaps one of reishi mushroom’s best-known functions is its ability to boost the immune system. ( 12 )Research shows that one of the mechanisms reishi uses to achieve this is alteration of your white blood cells’ inflammation pathways. ( 13 )Some research also suggests that reishi mushroom may reduce fatigue, anxiety and depression symptoms.The study in question looked at 48 breast cancer providers and determined that reishi mushroom increased their quality of life and decreased their depression and anxiety symptoms after four weeks of taking reishi powder. ( 14 )Reishi mushroom can also increase natural killer cell activity, which in turn fights off infections and may help fight cancer. ( 15 )It’s worth pointing out, however, that while research suggests many of these mushrooms contain anti-cancer properties, that doesn’t mean they’re approved as a cancer treatment, nor are they guaranteed to prevent cancer. Watch: The David Wolfe Team Harvests Reishi Mushroom In North Carolina 3. Lion’s Mane Mushroom Lion’s mane mushroom is a shaggy-looking fungi with a history of medicinal use in Asian cultures. ( 16 )Research shows that lion’s mane mushroom extract can reduce memory loss and neuronal damage in mice caused by mechanisms similar to what produces Alzheimer’s disease. ( 17 , 18 , 19 , 20 )The extract appears to work by reducing the impact of amyloid-beta plaques, which build up in the brain during Alzheimer’s.Further, research shows that lion’s mane mushroom powder can improve mental functioning. The study in question looked at older adults with mild cognitive issues and found that the powder significantly improved their mental ability. These benefits disappeared when the test subjects stopped using the powder. ( 21 )Lion’s mane mushroom may also help reduce mild depression and anxiety symptoms. ( 22 )How does it do this? The mechanisms aren’t totally clear, but research suggests it may have to do with how lion’s mane extract improves functioning and regenerates cells in the hippocampus. ( 23 ) 4. Cordyceps Mushroom As with many of the other mushrooms on this list, traditional Chinese medicine has incorporated cordyceps mushrooms for centuries. ( 24 ) Cordyceps mushrooms may increase exercise performance thanks to their ability to boost adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in the body. This molecule delivers energy to your muscles and can help your body make better use of oxygen during exercise. ( 25 ) In one study, researchers gave 20 healthy adults either one gram of cordyceps or a placebo. The participants who received the cordyceps saw significant improvements in markers for fitness performance. ( 26 )Cordyceps mushroom may also provide anti-aging benefits and reduce fatigue. Research suggests this may be due to cordyceps’ antioxidant capabilities, which fight free radical damage. Current theories of aging and body breakdown suggest that free radical damage is the root of several types of degenerative damage. ( 27 , 28 ) 5. Turkey Tail Mushroom One look at turkey tail mushroom and you’ll know where it gets its name from. Don’t worry, it has nothing to do with actual turkeys, though; this mushroom – like all the others on this list – is vegan-friendly!Turkey tail mushroom is packed with antioxidants that prevent oxidative stress caused by those pesky free radicals. In one study, researchers detected more than 35 different antioxidants in turkey tail mushroom. ( 29 )These antioxidants fall under the “phenolic” category. Phenols reduce inflammation and help your body release protective nutrients. Further, turkey tail mushroom may improve gut health thanks to the prebiotics it contains. ( 30 )Proving this, in one study researchers observed turkey tail mushroom suppressing E. coli growth. The mushroom also improved overall gut health in the subjects. ( 31 ) Medicinal Mushrooms – The Takeaway While traditional medicine has relied on medicinal mushrooms for centuries, it wasn’t until recently that modern medicine began confirming some […]

Damaging effects of blue light worsen with age, study reveals

Damaging effects of blue light worsen with age, study reveals

( Natural News ) Recent research from Oregon State University (OSU) revealed that the damaging effects of exposure to blue light emanating from phones and computers worsen as a person ages .

Previous studies all over the world have proven that constant exposure to blue light is detrimental to health due to the advent of electronic devices that rely on light-emitting diode (LED) technology.

“LED lighting technology, even in the most developed countries, has not been used long enough to know its effects across the human lifespan,” Jaga Giebultowicz, a researcher at the OSU College of Science said in a release.

According to Giebultowicz, there are increasing concerns that extended exposure to artificial light, especially blue-enriched LED light, may be detrimental to human health .

“While the full effect of blue light exposure across the lifespan are not yet known in humans, accelerated aging observed in a short-lived model organism should alert us to the potential of cellular damage by this stressor,” she added

The study, published last week in Nature Partner Journals Aging , involved Drosophila melanogaster or the common fruit fly. The researchers use the model organism due to the similarity of its cellular and developmental mechanisms with humans and other animals.

They analyzed the survival rates of the flies that were kept in darkness and then moved at older ages to an environment of constant blue light from LEDs. The darkness-to-light transitions were done at the ages of two, 20, 40 and 60 days and they involved blue light’s effect on the mitochondria of the flies’ cells.

The study proved that flies had impaired locomotion because blue light damaged their retinal cells and brain neurons. The insects had decreased ability to climb the walls of their enclosure.

In earlier research, flies subjected to daily cycles of 12 hours in light and 12 hours in darkness had shorter lives compared to flies kept in total darkness or those kept in light with the blue wavelengths filtered out.

“The novel aspect of this new study is showing that chronic exposure to blue light can impair energy-producing pathways even in cells that are not specialized in sensing light.

We determined that specific reactions in mitochondria were dramatically reduced by blue light, while other reactions were decreased by age independent of blue light. You can think of it as blue light exposure, adding insult to injury in aging flies,” Giebultowicz stated.

The researchers suggested that people should use eyeglasses with amber lenses as these filter out blue light and protect the retinas. (Related: Blue light found to accelerate aging and damage retinal cells .)

“You can also set your phones, laptops and other devices to block blue emissions,” they added. Blue light interferes with natural sleep cycles

Apart from the damage the blue light does to the retina and brain neurons, researches also show that devices emitting this could massively interfere with the natural sleep cycles.

The result of the National Sleep Foundation’s “2022 Sleep in America Poll” revealed that more than half of Americans indulge in screen time within an hour before bed or even while in bed.

Minimize exposure to blue light by wearing blue light-blocking glasses when looking at screens at night. Being the primary light sensor, restricting the blue light coming into the eye is key. It is also helpful to install filters for phones, tablets and laptop devices to reduce blue and UV light exposure.

Better yet, stay away from the devices an hour before bedtime. Not sleeping beside gadgets could definitely help.

During bedtime, sleep with an eye mask and use energy-efficient light bulbs such as halogen lights or low-wattage red night lights. These induce a calm and relaxing sleep atmosphere and also protect the retina.

People who are constantly exposed to LED lights may also strengthen the eyes by consuming foods rich in carotenoids , a form of vitamin A. Carotenoids can be found in red, orange and yellow fruits and vegetables, as well as in dark, leafy greens.

Also, there are pieces of evidence that managing weight can be beneficial to eye health. Higher weight leads to higher diabetes risk, and high blood sugar levels can damage micro-vessels in the eye. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to retinopathy and, potentially, blindness. Similarly, high blood pressure increases the risk of eye damage.

Visit EyeHealth.news for more articles on how to protect the eyes from LED or blue light.

Watch the video below about 5G blue light toxicity . No compatible source was found for this media. More related stories:

The dark side of blue light: Constantly looking at a screen is bad for your eyes, skin, sleep and health .

Not just carrots: Study shows that bog bilberry can protect your eyes against blue light emitted by electronic devices .

Exposure to blue light decreases blood pressure, new study suggests . Sources include:

Today.OregonState.edu Nature.com BlockBlueLight.com.au

Read more at www.naturalnews.com

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Cold-activated brown fat soaks up glucose to starve tumors of fuel

Cold-activated brown fat soaks up glucose to starve tumors of fuel

“limiting glucose supply is probably one of the most important methods for tumor suppression”

“Scientists have made an important discovery around how brown fat can hamper tumor growth through glucose metabolism Depositphotos Scientists investigating the way a certain type of fat behaves in response to cold have made a discovery that could have ramifications for cancer treatment. The breakthrough centers on the way the body metabolizes glucose, and hints at the possibility that chilly temperatures can help starve tumor cells of a vital fuel source they need to thrive.

The research was carried out by scientists at Sweden’s Karolinska Institutet and focuses on what’s known as brown fat . Distinct from the persistent white fat that stores extra energy as lipids to form love handles and beer bellies, brown fat readily burns away energy to keep the body warm in colder temperatures.

The thinking behind this new study was to explore the way activation of brown fat may impact on tumor growth, which relies heavily on glucose. The experiments began with mouse models of various cancers, with the rodents exposed to both cold and warm temperatures. Mice kept at 4 °C (39.2 °F) exhibited far slower tumor growth and lived nearly twice as long as mice living in rooms at 30 °C (86 °F).

Analysis of tissues, cellular reactions and glucose metabolism showed that the colder temperatures drove significant uptake in glucose in the brown fat tissue. Meanwhile, glucose signals could barely be detected in the tumor cells. Follow up experiments in which the scientists removed the brown fat or hampered its function essentially eliminated the cancer-fighting effects of the cold temperature exposure and enabled the tumors to grow at normal pace. Feeding the mice sugary drinks had a similar effect.

“Interestingly, high sugar drinks seem to cancel out the effect of cold temperatures on cancer cells, suggesting that limiting glucose supply is probably one of the most important methods for tumor suppression,” says study author Professor Yihai Cao.

The team did find some evidence that similar effects could be at play in humans. Subsequent experiments involving a small group of healthy subjects and one cancer patient produced similar results, with lower glucose uptake observed in tumor cells at lower temperatures, of around 22 °C (71.6 °F).

“We found that cold-activated brown adipose tissue competes against tumors for glucose and can help inhibit tumor growth in mice,” said Cao. “Our findings suggest that cold exposure could be a promising novel approach to cancer therapy, although this needs to be validated in larger clinical studies.”

The research was published in the journal Nature .

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Study: Strawberries can help protect against brain inflammation and Alzheimer’s

Study: Strawberries can help protect against brain inflammation and Alzheimer’s

( Natural News ) Strawberries are nutritious and they are full of beneficial antioxidants and plant compounds. According to a study, consuming strawberries can also help protect the brain from Alzheimer’s disease by reducing inflammation .

The study was published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease .

In the study, researchers from Rush University in Chicago, Illinois, discovered that adults older than 65 who regularly consumed strawberries had fewer tau proteins in their brains. Higher concentrations of tau proteins are linked to Alzheimer’s. Strawberries, brain health and Alzheimer’s

For the study, the research team examined the brains of 575 deceased patients with an average age of 91 years. None of the patients had Alzheimer’s disease .

For more than two decades before their deaths, each participant answered an annual survey about their diet. The researchers used the survey results to keep track of the patients’ diets.

The patients also had their cognitive ability tested annually. Results from an autopsy revealed that the group that consumed the most strawberries had the lowest concentration of tau proteins.

The researchers reported that they did not find any link between tau protein levels and those who had the APOE-4 gene, which is believed to raise the risk of Alzheimer’s.

Dr. Julie Schneider, the neuropathologist who led the study, explained that the research team suspects the anti-inflammatory properties of pelargonidin — an active compound in strawberries — may decrease overall neuroinflammation, which may reduce cytokine production.

Cytokines are proteins produced by cells that can trigger an inflammatory response. (Related: Study: Consuming apples, oranges and strawberries can help people with Parkinson’s disease live longer .)

Inflammation in the brain may be caused by many factors such as infections, extreme stress and a lack of sleep. These are also risk factors for developing Alzheimer’s .

Dr. Puja Agarwal, a nutritional epidemiologist who was also involved in the research, advised that eating strawberries is a “simple change” that anyone could make to their regular diet. However, he acknowledged that the study was observational, meaning it wasn’t clear whether the strawberries themselves reduced the risk.

Agarwal said that further research is needed to learn more about the role of nutrition in Alzheimer’s, but the study findings suggest that certain dietary components, like berries, may offer significant benefits for brain health .

Alzheimer’s disease is a debilitating condition affecting over 6.5 million Americans. By 2050, this figure is expected to more than double. Early signs of Alzheimer’s include difficulties remembering recent events or conversations or where something was left.

In the last stages of the disease, people with Alzheimer’s might repeat themselves or questions over and over. They can also get lost even in familiar places and have trouble finding the right words to identify common objects. Health benefits of strawberries

Strawberries are one of the top sources of pelargonidin, a compound that is believed to be an anti-inflammatory. Other sources of pelargonidin include kidney beans, plums, radishes and raspberries.

Strawberry ( Fragaria ananassa ) is a hybrid of two wild strawberry species from North America and Chile. These berries are bright red, juicy and sweet.

Strawberries are full of vitamin C and manganese . They also contain decent amounts of folate or vitamin B9 and potassium.

Strawberries are full of antioxidants and plant compounds, which are believed to offer benefits for heart health and blood sugar control. Healthy strawberry desserts to try

Following a balanced diet is key to your overall health. Eat lots of nutritious foods like strawberries and try some of the healthy recipes below.

Strawberry oatmeal bars

Instead of buying oatmeal or granola bars, make strawberry oatmeal bars at home using fresh ingredients and none of the added preservatives often used in store-bought oatmeal bars.

Ingredients for 16 strawberry bars: 1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats (Use gluten-free oats if preferred.)

2 cups strawberries (about 10 ounces), diced small and divided

3/4 cup white whole wheat flour (Use 1:1 baking flour to make gluten-free bars.)

1/3 cup light brown sugar

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted (For vegan/dairy-free bars, use melted coconut oil.) 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice from about 1/2 small lemon 1 tablespoon granulated sugar divided 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon cornstarch Ingredients for the vanilla glaze (optional if you prefer a sweeter bar): 1/2 cup powdered sugar sifted 1 tablespoon milk 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract Preparation: > Place a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 375 F. Line an 8×8-inch baking pan with parchment paper. Let the paper overhang from two sides like makeshift handles. In a medium bowl, combine the oats, flour, brown sugar, ginger and salt. Pour the melted butter into the oat mixture and stir until it forms clumps and all the dry ingredients are evenly moistened. Set aside 1/2 cup of the crumble mixture. Press the rest into an even layer at the bottom of the pan with parchment paper. Scatter half of the sliced strawberries over the crust. Sprinkle the cornstarch evenly over the top, then sprinkle the lemon juice followed by the half a tablespoon of the granulated sugar. Scatter the remaining berries over the crust, then the remaining half a tablespoon of the sugar. Sprinkle the reserved crumbs evenly over the top. You should have some fruit showing through. Bake the bars for 35 to 40 minutes. The bars are done when the fruit is bubbly and the crumb topping smells toasty and turns golden. Place the pan on a wire rack to cool completely. Speed up this process by refrigerating the pan. Prepare the glaze. In a medium bowl, briskly whisk together the powdered sugar, vanilla and milk. Whisk until the mixture is smooth. Add more milk if you want a thinner consistency. Use the parchment-paper “handles” to lift the bars from the pan. Drizzle with glaze and slice before serving. Blueberry-strawberry smoothie bowl Start your day with a tasty and nutritious blueberry-strawberry smoothie bowl . Ingredients for 1 serving: 1 cup ice cubes 3/4 cup fresh blueberries , divided 1/2 cup fresh strawberries, sliced 1/3 cup 2% […]

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