Lockdown is taking its toll on sleep cycle of Indians

Lockdown is taking its toll on sleep cycle of Indians

New Delhi: Binge-watching till dawn, playing endless online games, video chats until the sun rises or simply staring into darkness while everyone around is in deep slumber wakeful nights are no longer about once in a while but too often for comfort.

As India navigates the ninth week of the nationwide lockdown that pushed millions of people into the confines of their homes, distress and anxiety are on the rise, manifesting primarily in the form of sleep disorders.

Medical experts said the number of consultation calls over erratic sleep cycles have shot up since the country went into lockdown on March 25 to stem the spread of COVID-19. “People are living with many uncertainties and insecurities. Worrying about health, job and financial security and managing household chores alongside office deadlines, all the while working from home are among the factors influencing our sleep quality,” said Gulshan Kumar, a neurophysiologist at the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS).

The Bangalore-based medical institution has also seen an increase in the number of queries related to sleep issues like insomnia since the lockdown started, he said. Quantifying the stress over jobs, working from home, a pandemic that shows no signs of ebbing and an uncertain future, a pan-India survey by wakefit.co revealed that 44 per cent of 1,500 respondents were getting less than six hours of sleep during the lockdown.

The number of people facing a sleep crisis before March 25 was significantly lower at 26 per cent, the survey by the Bangalore-based sleep solutions company added, While many complain of insomnia and sleep deprivation, there are some who are seeking treatment for oversleeping or hypersomnia.

And there are those like Gaganjot Kaur who have both insomnia and hypersomnia. The 33-year-old said she cannot remember even one night of restful sleep in the last two months. Most nights she can get barely get three hours of sleep, but there have also been days when she’s slept for 10 hours at a stretch and still wakes up feeling unrested.

“It’s not like I am consciously trying to stay awake. I find myself up at three in the morning for no reason. It’s almost like there is a disconnect between my body and its need for sleep,” the Delhi University philosophy professor said. She said she had been diagnosed with General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) a few years ago and was seeing a therapist. But her condition aggravated in the last two months.

Gaganjot, who enrolled in a Phd course recently, said she was initially thankful for the lockdown, assuming it would give her a lot of time to focus on her research work. But as it kept getting extended, she found her mind inundated with panic-inducing thoughts.

“I think about hundreds of things when I lie awake in bed, but I immediately start spiralling when I think of my career. I constantly feel I am not being productive enough. Another thing I cannot stop worrying about is my parents, who are extremely vulnerable to the coronavirus infection,” Ganganjot, who lives with husband and sister-in-law, said.

The “new anxieties” combined with the lack of enough sleep have started affecting not just her professional productivity, but also her relationships. “Work wise I am not able to achieve even half of what I aim for. Besides, I find myself snapping and feeling irritated at my family members,” she said.

Priyanka Dass, who once had a “nearly perfect” 11 pm to 5 am sleep cycle, found herself struggling to stay awake as soon as the clock struck 7 in the evening, particularly the first few weeks of the lockdown.

“I would fall asleep in the evening, for not more than a couple of hours around 7-9 pm, and then would barely sleep through the night,” the Delhi-based publicist said. During most of these sleepless nights, the 25-year-old ended up “overthinking everything”, and once also had a panic attack. She then started watching Netflix and reading books to keep her mind occupied.

“Sometimes, I simply hop out of bed to whip up something in the kitchen,” she said. According to mental health expert Prakriti Poddar, carefully cultivated routines over the years have gone for a toss and the stress is natural.

“In times like these when everybody is at home, and routines have changed, people might feel low, and even depressed, creating a sleep crisis. “Stress and worry have an intense impact on the sleep cycle,” she said. Both Kumar and Poddar advise against ignoring irregular sleeping patterns, which can affect cognitive abilities, including learning and memory retention, over a long period.

“Research confirms that there is a strong link between learning, memory and sleep. During sleep, nerve cell connections in the brain are strengthened and this enhances the brain’s abilities to stabilise and retain memories. “With a disrupted sleep cycle or not enough sleep, it is very difficult for the brain to stabilise neural connections and consolidate memory effectively,” Kumar explained.

Sound sleep of seven-nine hours is an important aspect of recovery, added Poddar. Doctors recommend physical activity, yoga and maybe some music to calm the mind and body.

The list of don’ts includes using electronic devices like mobile phones and laptops before sleeping and caffeinated drinks such as colas, alcohol, coffee, and tea, particularly in the evening. “The bedtime and wake time should be consistent from day to day, including on weekends. Regular vigorous exercise for 20-30 minutes during the day promotes a good night’s sleep.

“If despite all this, an individual is not able to sleep within 20 minutes, they should move out of the bed and perform some light, non-stimulating activity like reading a book and wait until the feeling of drowsiness sets in,” said Vivek Nangia, director, pulmonology, Medical Critical Care & Sleep Disorders, Fortis Hospital, New Delhi.

Read more at www.freepressjournal.in

Too little and too much: lockdown anxieties take toll on sleep cycles

Too little and too much: lockdown anxieties take toll on sleep cycles

New Delhi, May 26 (PTI) Binge-watching till dawn, playing endless online games, video chats until the sun rises or simply staring into darkness while everyone around is in deep slumber… wakeful nights are no longer about once in a while but too often for comfort.

As India navigates the ninth week of the nationwide lockdown that pushed millions of people into the confines of their homes, distress and anxiety are on the rise, manifesting primarily in the form of sleep disorders.

Medical experts said the number of consultation calls over erratic sleep cycles have shot up since the country went into lockdown on March 25 to stem the spread of COVID-19. “People are living with many uncertainties and insecurities. Worrying about health, job and financial security and managing household chores alongside office deadlines, all the while working from home are among the factors influencing our sleep quality,” said Gulshan Kumar, a neurophysiologist at the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS).

The Bangalore-based medical institution has also seen an increase in the number of queries related to sleep issues like insomnia since the lockdown started, he said. Quantifying the stress over jobs, working from home, a pandemic that shows no signs of ebbing and an uncertain future, a pan-India survey by wakefit.co revealed that 44 per cent of 1,500 respondents were getting less than six hours of sleep during the lockdown. The number of people facing a sleep crisis before March 25 was significantly lower at 26 per cent, the survey by the Bangalore-based sleep solutions company added, While many complain of insomnia and sleep deprivation, there are some who are seeking treatment for oversleeping or hypersomnia.

And there are those like Gaganjot Kaur who have both insomnia and hypersomnia.

The 33-year-old said she cannot remember even one night of restful sleep in the last two months. Most nights she can get barely get three hours of sleep, but there have also been days when she’s slept for 10 hours at a stretch and still wakes up feeling unrested.

“It’s not like I am consciously trying to stay awake. I find myself up at three in the morning for no reason. It’s almost like there is a disconnect between my body and its need for sleep,” the Delhi University philosophy professor said. She said she had been diagnosed with General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) a few years ago and was seeing a therapist. But her condition aggravated in the last two months. Gaganjot, who enrolled in a Phd course recently, said she was initially thankful for the lockdown, assuming it would give her a lot of time to focus on her research work. But as it kept getting extended, she found her mind inundated with panic-inducing thoughts.

“I think about hundreds of things when I lie awake in bed, but I immediately start spiralling when I think of my career. I constantly feel I am not being productive enough. Another thing I cannot stop worrying about is my parents, who are extremely vulnerable to the coronavirus infection,” Ganganjot, who lives with husband and sister-in-law, said.

The “new anxieties” combined with the lack of enough sleep have started affecting not just her professional productivity, but also her relationships.

“Work wise I am not able to achieve even half of what I aim for. Besides, I find myself snapping and feeling irritated at my family members,” she said.

Priyanka Dass, who once had a “nearly perfect” 11 pm to 5 am sleep cycle, found herself struggling to stay awake as soon as the clock struck 7 in the evening, particularly the first few weeks of the lockdown.

“I would fall asleep in the evening, for not more than a couple of hours around 7-9 pm, and then would barely sleep through the night,” the Delhi-based publicist said. During most of these sleepless nights, the 25-year-old ended up “overthinking everything”, and once also had a panic attack. She then started watching Netflix and reading books to keep her mind occupied.

“Sometimes, I simply hop out of bed to whip up something in the kitchen,” she said. According to mental health expert Prakriti Poddar, carefully cultivated routines over the years have gone for a toss and the stress is natural.

“In times like these when everybody is at home, and routines have changed, people might feel low, and even depressed, creating a sleep crisis. “Stress and worry have an intense impact on the sleep cycle,” she said. Both Kumar and Poddar advise against ignoring irregular sleeping patterns, which can affect cognitive abilities, including learning and memory retention, over a long period.

“Research confirms that there is a strong link between learning, memory and sleep. During sleep, nerve cell connections in the brain are strengthened and this enhances the brain’s abilities to stabilise and retain memories. “With a disrupted sleep cycle or not enough sleep, it is very difficult for the brain to stabilise neural connections and consolidate memory effectively,” Kumar explained.

Sound sleep of seven-nine hours is an important aspect of recovery, added Poddar.

Doctors recommend physical activity, yoga and maybe some music to calm the mind and body.

The list of don’ts includes using electronic devices like mobile phones and laptops before sleeping and caffeinated drinks such as colas, alcohol, coffee, and tea, particularly in the evening. “The bedtime and wake time should be consistent from day to day, including on weekends. Regular vigorous exercise for 20-30 minutes during the day promotes a good night’s sleep.

“If despite all this, an individual is not able to sleep within 20 minutes, they should move out of the bed and perform some light, non-stimulating activity like reading a book and wait until the feeling of drowsiness sets in,” said Vivek Nangia, director, pulmonology, Medical Critical Care & Sleep Disorders, Fortis Hospital, New Delhi. PTI TRS MG MIN MIN MIN

Read more at in.news.yahoo.com

Binge-watching, video chats till dawn: Coronavirus lockdown anxieties take toll on sleep cycle

Binge-watching till dawn, playing endless online games, video chats until the sun rises or simply staring into darkness while everyone around is in deep slumber… wakeful nights are no longer about once in a while but too often for comfort. (Unsplash) Binge-watching till dawn, playing endless online games, video chats until the sun rises or simply staring into darkness while everyone around is in deep slumber… wakeful nights are no longer about once in a while but too often for comfort. As India navigates the ninth week of the nationwide lockdown that pushed millions of people into the confines of their homes, distress and anxiety are on the rise, manifesting primarily in the form of sleep disorders.

Medical experts said the number of consultation calls over erratic sleep cycles have shot up since the country went into lockdown on March 25 to stem the spread of COVID-19. “People are living with many uncertainties and insecurities. Worrying about health, job and financial security and managing household chores alongside office deadlines, all the while working from home are among the factors influencing our sleep quality,” said Gulshan Kumar, a neurophysiologist at the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS).

The Bangalore-based medical institution has also seen an increase in the number of queries related to sleep issues like insomnia since the lockdown started, he said. Quantifying the stress over jobs, working from home, a pandemic that shows no signs of ebbing and an uncertain future, a pan-India survey by wakefit.co revealed that 44 per cent of 1,500 respondents were getting less than six hours of sleep during the lockdown. The number of people facing a sleep crisis before March 25 was significantly lower at 26 per cent, the survey by the Bangalore-based sleep solutions company added, While many complain of insomnia and sleep deprivation, there are some who are seeking treatment for oversleeping or hypersomnia. And there are those like Gaganjot Kaur who have both insomnia and hypersomnia.

The 33-year-old said she cannot remember even one night of restful sleep in the last two months. Most nights she can get barely get three hours of sleep, but there have also been days when she’s slept for 10 hours at a stretch and still wakes up feeling unrested. “It’s not like I am consciously trying to stay awake. I find myself up at three in the morning for no reason. It’s almost like there is a disconnect between my body and its need for sleep,” the Delhi University philosophy professor said. She said she had been diagnosed with General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) a few years ago and was seeing a therapist. But her condition aggravated in the last two months. Gaganjot, who enrolled in a Phd course recently, said she was initially thankful for the lockdown, assuming it would give her a lot of time to focus on her research work. But as it kept getting extended, she found her mind inundated with panic-inducing thoughts.

“I think about hundreds of things when I lie awake in bed, but I immediately start spiralling when I think of my career. I constantly feel I am not being productive enough. Another thing I cannot stop worrying about is my parents, who are extremely vulnerable to the coronavirus infection,” Ganganjot, who lives with husband and sister-in-law, said. The “new anxieties” combined with the lack of enough sleep have started affecting not just her professional productivity, but also her relationships.

“Work wise I am not able to achieve even half of what I aim for. Besides, I find myself snapping and feeling irritated at my family members,” she said. Priyanka Dass, who once had a “nearly perfect” 11 pm to 5 am sleep cycle, found herself struggling to stay awake as soon as the clock struck 7 in the evening, particularly the first few weeks of the lockdown.

“I would fall asleep in the evening, for not more than a couple of hours around 7-9 pm, and then would barely sleep through the night,” the Delhi-based publicist said. During most of these sleepless nights, the 25-year-old ended up “overthinking everything”, and once also had a panic attack. She then started watching Netflix and reading books to keep her mind occupied. “Sometimes, I simply hop out of bed to whip up something in the kitchen,” she said. According to mental health expert Prakriti Poddar, carefully cultivated routines over the years have gone for a toss and the stress is natural. “In times like these when everybody is at home, and routines have changed, people might feel low, and even depressed, creating a sleep crisis. “Stress and worry have an intense impact on the sleep cycle,” she said. Both Kumar and Poddar advise against ignoring irregular sleeping patterns, which can affect cognitive abilities, including learning and memory retention, over a long period.

“Research confirms that there is a strong link between learning, memory and sleep. During sleep, nerve cell connections in the brain are strengthened and this enhances the brain’s abilities to stabilise and retain memories. “With a disrupted sleep cycle or not enough sleep, it is very difficult for the brain to stabilise neural connections and consolidate memory effectively,” Kumar explained. Sound sleep of seven-nine hours is an important aspect of recovery, added Poddar.

Doctors recommend physical activity, yoga and maybe some music to calm the mind and body. The list of don’ts includes using electronic devices like mobile phones and laptops before sleeping and caffeinated drinks such as colas, alcohol, coffee, and tea, particularly in the evening. “The bedtime and wake time should be consistent from day to day, including on weekends. Regular vigorous exercise for 20-30 minutes during the day promotes a good night’s sleep.

“If despite all this, an individual is not able to sleep within 20 minutes, they should move out of the bed and perform some light, non-stimulating activity like reading a book and wait until the feeling of drowsiness sets in,” said Vivek Nangia, director, pulmonology, Medical Critical Care & Sleep Disorders, Fortis Hospital, New Delhi.

(This story has been […]

Read more at www.hindustantimes.com

From helping to manage depression and anxiety to preventing diabetes, here’s why tea always seems to do the trick

From helping to manage depression and anxiety to preventing diabetes, here's why tea always seems to do the trick

Expand Warm comforts: the humble cup of tea has many hidden benefits There’s no doubt we’re a nation of tea-lovers – and apparently we’ve been getting through an extra two cups a day during the pandemic. That’s on top of the average four to six cuppas a day we normally drink, according to energy comparison site SaveOnEnergy.com.

It’s little surprise, then, that the Tea Advisory Panel (TAP) found 80% of people say tea provides relief from daily problems and stresses.

TAP says tea contains natural plant substances, including polyphenols, caffeine, and amino acid L-theanine (a building block of protein) which act on the body and mind. A recent major review found L-theanine improves the ability to manage stress and anxiety, and earlier studies have shown it triggers various parts of the brain linked with relaxation and mental focus to light up, helping us deal with distractions.

“We often turn to tea when in need of a boost or to help us handle stress,” says dietitian Dr Carrie Ruxton (above). “Whether it’s a comforting mug of tea with family, or the peaceful ritual of brewing up some tea leaves in your favourite teapot, tea always seems to do the trick. Yet we know from the science that it’s not our imagination, as there are now several studies pointing to the mental health benefits of drinking tea every day.”

One study, she says, asked participants to drink black tea or a placebo drink daily for six weeks, and were then asked to complete a series of stressful mental tasks. The tea drinkers were found to have lower levels of stress hormones in their blood, and reported feeling more relaxed after the tasks.

Fellow TAP member Dr Tim Bond adds: “Tea is a healthy drink and can make a useful contribution to our daily fluid requirements and help maintain good hydration during lockdown.

“Tea may contribute to immune function, partly due to a beneficial effect on the gut microflora. It’s a pleasant, comforting drink and can help us feel better during this time of stress and uncertainty. Enjoying four to six cups daily is good for our physical and mental health.”

Want more proof of how good that cuppa really is? Here, Dr Bond outlines the science…

1. It may reduce or delay dementia risk

A study of 957 elderly Chinese people found consistent drinking of black/oolong tea reduced the risk of cognitive disorders by 53%, and for green tea by 43%. The findings also suggested those genetically at higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease may reduce this by as much as 86%. “This health benefit is likely to be due to the catechin content of tea,” says Dr Bond.

A laboratory study found the dominant member of this catechin family could reduce the cognitive defects linked with a western diet high in fat and sugar, and Dr Bond says further research has found a positive contribution of tea drinking to brain structure, suggesting a protective effect on age-related decline in brain organisation.

2. It enhances cognition and memory

A review of 49 human studies found two ingredients in tea – L-theanine and caffeine – in combination are associated with improved attention, memory and alertness more than either ingredient on its own.

3. It helps reduce depression and anxiety

Another 2018 study found long-term tea consumption among elderly people was associated with reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression. Theaflavins, compounds found in black tea, have been found to reduce depression and prevent memory impairment. Theaflavins have also been shown to reduce anxiety by increasing dopamine turnover in the brain.

4. It lowers the risk of cardiovascular problems

A review published in 2012 found regular tea consumption could reduce the risk of heart and circulation problems by up to 20%. Some studies have found this effect could even be as high as 45%. In one 2019 study of 208 patients, tea-drinking was linked with reduced arterial disease compared with soft drinks, which were linked with increased arterial disease.

5. It helps prevent type 2 diabetes

Studies also indicate the beneficial effect of being a regular tea-drinker in relation to type 2 diabetes – particularly green tea. A study published recently by Cambridge University Press, of 12,017 people aged 20-70, found daily tea-drinking reduced diabetes risk in women by 32%. Dark tea reduced the risk by 45%.

6. It helps with weight management

“This is thought to be because of the catechin content in tea and because of positive changes in the gut bacteria thanks to tea drinking,” says Dr Bond, who explains that tea catechins are believed to increase activation of brown adipose tissue, which helps the body get rid of energy (calories).

Scientists are increasingly understanding the role of gut bacteria in obesity and weight management. A 2017 University of California study found both black and green tea changed the ratio of intestinal bacteria. The percentage of bacteria associated with obesity decreased, while bacteria associated with lean body mass increased. This change in the gut microflora was associated with increased energy metabolism.

7. It helps tackle high blood pressure

A study published in 2012 found that drinking black tea could have a 10% effect in reducing blood pressure, while separate research found regularly drinking green tea could reduce the risk of high blood pressure by 46%. “Tea and its compounds have been shown to help relax smooth muscle and reduce inflammation in arteries, which may help to explain these effects on blood pressure,” explains Dr Bond.

8. It’s good for oral health

“There’s evidence tea can combat bad breath and reduce inflammation, bone re-absorption and the growth of bacteria associated with gum disease,” says Dr Bond. One study found tea helped with a 40% reduction in dental decay risk. 9. It’s good for eye health Research also shows that daily tea-drinking could reduce the risk of developing glaucoma and cataracts, among the most common potentially sight-threatening eye conditions. Tea catechins may also protect against age-related macular degeneration, says Dr Bond. 10. It keeps bones strong “Tea-drinkers tend to have stronger bones,” […]

Read more at www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk

These Ingredients In Your Eid Dishes Are Immunity Boosters

These Ingredients In Your Eid Dishes Are Immunity Boosters

While Eid may be all about good food, the wisdom of people who designed the traditional cuisine associated with it have ensured that the drool-worthy taste is offset by some of the healthiest immunity-boosting ingredients. Let’s take a look at why it’s perfectly alright to dig in, this Eid!

Mutton

Image: 123rf.com

The lamb in festive dishes like Rogan Josh and biryani is not only delicious. It is also rich in zinc, a mineral which works with the protein content of the meat to boost the immune system. This is because it enhances the functioning of the body’s white blood cells. If you’re sceptical of red meat sources for reasons of cholesterol, substitute with a lean meat option like skinless poultry, which may not compare in taste, but also comes with similar benefits.

Mint
Image: 123rf.com

The sumptuous kebabs and sides are best offset with a generous helping of versatile pudina chutney, which offers the goodness of mint. One of the superfoods for immunity, mint is rich in antioxidants and phytonutrients, making it ideal for reducing oxidative stress. It is also anti-inflammatory, and rich in vitamin A. Mint is excellent for all kinds of digestive problems – keeping the intestinal tract clean, preventing acidity and heartburn, improving digestion and keeping you cool during the warm summer months.

Saffron Image: 123rf.com

It’s the most expensive spice in the world for a reason, and could cost up to a whopping Rs.1,50,000 for a kilogram! Used liberally across dishes like biryani and desserts, the spice with the exquisite flavour contains antioxidant benefits, like crocin, crocetin and safranal. The first two are mood uplifters and can keep depression and anxiety at bay (that’s why it’s called the sunshine spice!), with regular usage also preventing brain cells from degenerating and boosting memory. Saffron can also help prevent certain kinds of cancers, help with PMS symptoms, keeps blood sugar and heart health in check, has eye benefits and can act as an aphrodisiac!

Dates Image: 123rf.com

Sheer Khurma is a traditional dessert made for Eid with dates as a key ingredient. Dates are one of the best sources of vitamin C among the gamut of dried fruits. It also boasts a range of B vitamins and helps in digestion. Since it contains natural sugars, it is nature’s sweetener, and also provides for reserves of energy the right way.

Onion

Image: 123rf.com

Onion raita, the accompaniment to your biryani, boasts one of the best veggies for immunity. The medicinal properties of onions have been celebrated through the ages, due to their concentrated antibacterial benefits. They’re packed with vitamin C, vitamin B and potassium, and contain quercetin, a flavonoid antioxidant that can keep cancer and heart-related ailments at bay. It can even help reduce PCOS, help enhance bone density and control blood sugar.

Assorted Spices

Image: 123rf.com

Eid in India is synonymous with festive marinades, and curries require the goodness of Indian spices and use traditional immunity boosters like turmeric (where the key ingredient curcumin has far-flung benefits from heart health to cancer prevention), coriander (good for regulating blood sugar, fighting infections and protecting your skin), ginger (fabulous for coughs and colds) and cumin (which promotes digestion and enhances metabolism).

Read more at www.femina.in

Food for thought: 12 Foods to boost brain power

Food for thought: 12 Foods to boost brain power

Advertisement Believe it or not, the foods we eat can also have a big impact on the structure and overall health of our brains. Without “feeding” the brain adequate nutrients, we put ourselves at risk of premature cognitive decline and irreversible neurological conditions like Alzheimer’s disease later in life.

Looking to take a more proactive approach to brain health? Incorporate the following brain-boosting foods into a balanced diet and watch the magic happen. Almond butter

Plant-based foods like almond butter boast a more impressive nutrition profile than their non-organic counterparts. Almond butter, in particular, is an excellent source of vitamin E , a powerful antioxidant that protects against inflammation and cellular damage in the brain. In addition, almonds contain high levels of magnesium and potassium, both of which are linked to better brain function. Avocado

Avocados are an excellent plant-based source of omega-3 oils that reduce inflammation in the brain. Avocados are also rich in folate, an essential B vitamin that prevents the abnormal buildup of proteins in the brain thought to trigger dementia. Walnut

Most nuts, in general, make for excellent brain-boosting snacks. But walnuts are among the few hailed for their high alpha- linolenic acid (ALA) content. ALA is known to protect brain cells from cellular damage and inflammation due to free radicals, thus reducing the risk of brain conditions like Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis and stroke. Butternut squash

As a general rule, bright fruits and vegetables are good for brain health. One reason for this is because the pigments in these foods also act as antioxidants. Take the carotenoids in butternut squash, for instance. These plant compounds, which are also found in carrots and oranges, help minimize oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain. Berries

If orange foods have carotenoids, berries have anthocyanins. These water-soluble plant compounds are responsible for the red, purple, blue and black colors of berries. Apart from their antioxidant effects, anthocyanins also help maintain brain functions over time. Cruciferous vegetables

Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts contain bioactive plant compounds known as glucosinolates. These compounds protect against oxidative stress, thus minimizing the risk of dementia. Cruciferous vegetables are also chock-full of brain-boosting nutrients including potassium, folate and vitamin C. Halibut

Lean fishes like halibut make for excellent brain-boosting foods. Halibut is rich in vitamin D, an essential micronutrient involved in brain health. Vitamin B12, a B complex vitamin associated with memory, can also only be found in animal products like fish and eggs. Beans

Regular consumption of beans also supports overall brain health. Beans are rich in brain-boosting B complex vitamins like folate and vitamin B6. In particular, vitamin B6 is crucial for proper brain development in children and better brain functions in adults. Turmeric

Curcumin, the main active ingredient in turmeric , has been linked to brain health and improved cognitive functions thanks to its antioxidant effects. Besides preventing inflammation, curcumin also eliminates plaque in the brain that can lead to dementia. Whole grains

Whole grains like oats and quinoa are loaded with essential B complex vitamins that work to minimize inflammation in the brain. B complex vitamins have also been linked to better memory and a lower risk of cognitive decline. Green tea

A warm cup of green tea can do more than just calm the nerves and improve mood. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the main active ingredient in green tea, is a potent antioxidant known to promote overall brain health. Green tea is also an excellent source of L-theanine, an amino acid that promotes relaxation and regulates sleep. Coffee

When consumed in moderation, coffee promotes protective effects against cognitive decline. Caffeine, the natural stimulant in coffee, keeps brain cells active, thus improving mental performance including alertness and concentration. Take care not to drink too much coffee to avoid high blood pressure and insomnia.

Snack on these brain-boosting foods to improve brain functions and prevent dementia.

Read more articles about dementia prevention and other brain-boosting foods at Brain.news .

Sources:

GoodHousekeeping.com

ScienceDirect.com

Read more at www.food.news

How a soothing cuppa is packed with science-backed health benefits

How a soothing cuppa is packed with science-backed health benefits

© PA There’s no doubt we’re a nation of tea-lovers – and apparently we’ve been getting through an extra two cups a day during the pandemic. That’s on top of the average four to six cuppas a day we normally drink.

It’s little surprise, then, that the Tea Advisory Panel (Tap) found 80% of people say tea provides relief from daily problems and stresses.

Tap says tea contains natural plant substances, including polyphenols, caffeine and amino acid L-theanine (a building block of protein) which act on the body and mind. A recent major review found L-theanine improves the ability to manage stress and anxiety, and earlier studies have shown it triggers various parts of the brain linked with relaxation and mental focus to light up, helping us deal with distractions.

“We often turn to tea when in need of a boost or to help us handle stress,” says dietitian Dr Carrie Ruxton. “Whether it’s a comforting mug of tea with family, or the peaceful ritual of brewing up some tea leaves in your favourite teapot, tea always seems to do the trick. Yet we know from the science that it’s not our imagination, as there are now several studies pointing to the mental health benefits of drinking tea every day.”

One study, she says, asked participants to drink black tea or a placebo drink daily for six weeks, and were then asked to complete a series of stressful mental tasks. The tea drinkers were found to have lower levels of stress hormones in their blood, and reported feeling more relaxed after the tasks.

Fellow Tap member Dr Tim Bond adds: “Tea is a healthy drink and can make a useful contribution to our daily fluid requirements and help maintain good hydration during lockdown.

“Tea may contribute to immune function, partly due to a beneficial effect on the gut microflora. It’s a pleasant, comforting drink and can help us feel better during this time of stress and uncertainty. Enjoying four to six cups daily is good for our physical and mental health.”

Dr Bond outlines the science. It may reduce or delay dementia risk

A study of 957 elderly Chinese people found consistent drinking of black/oolong tea reduced the risk of cognitive disorders by 53%, and for green tea by 43%. The findings also suggested those genetically at higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease may reduce this by as much as 86%. “This health benefit is likely to be due to the catechin content of tea,” says Bond.

A laboratory study found the dominant member of this catechin family could reduce the cognitive defects linked with a Western diet high in fat and sugar, and Bond says further research has found a positive contribution of tea drinking to brain structure, suggesting a protective effect on age-related decline in brain organisation. It enhances cognition and memory

A review of 49 human studies found two ingredients in tea – L-theanine and caffeine – in combination are associated with improved attention, memory and alertness more than either ingredient on its own. It helps reduce depression and anxiety

Another 2018 study found long-term tea consumption among elderly people was associated with reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression. Theaflavins, compounds found in black tea, have been found to reduce depression and prevent memory impairment. Theaflavins have also been shown to reduce anxiety by increasing dopamine turnover in the brain. It lowers the risk of cardiovascular problems

A review published in 2012 found regular tea consumption could reduce the risk of heart and circulation problems by up to 20%. Some studies have found this effect could even be as high as 45%. In one 2019 study of 208 patients, tea drinking was linked with reduced arterial disease compared with soft drinks, which were linked with increased arterial disease. It helps prevent type 2 diabetes

Studies also indicate the beneficial effect of being a regular tea drinker in relation to type 2 diabetes – particularly green tea. A study published recently by Cambridge University Press, of 12,017 people aged 20-70, found daily tea drinking reduced diabetes risk in women by 32%. Dark tea reduced the risk by 45%. It helps with weight management

Scientists are increasingly understanding the role of gut bacteria in obesity and weight management. A 2017 University of California study found both black and green tea changed the ratio of intestinal bacteria. The percentage of bacteria associated with obesity decreased, while bacteria associated with lean body mass rose. This change in the gut microflora was associated with increased energy metabolism. It helps tackle high blood pressure

A study published in 2012 found drinking black tea could have a 10% effect in reducing blood pressure, while separate research found regularly drinking green tea could reduce the risk of high blood pressure by 46%. “Tea and its compounds have been shown to help relax smooth muscle and reduce inflammation in arteries, which may help to explain these effects on blood pressure,” explains Bond. It’s good for oral health

“There’s evidence tea can combat bad breath and reduce inflammation, bone reabsorption and the growth of bacteria associated with gum disease,” says Bond. One study found tea helped with a 40% reduction in dental decay risk. It’s good for eye health

Research also shows daily tea drinking could reduce the risk of developing glaucoma and cataracts, among the most common potentially sight-threatening eye conditions. Tea catechins may also protect against age-related macular degeneration, says Bond. It keeps bones strong

“Tea drinkers tend to have stronger bones,” says Bond, who explains that researchers report that tea appears to improve bone mineral density, especially in the spine, hip and neck. A further study also found tea consumption may help reduce the risk of osteoporosis. For as little as £5.99 a month you can access all of our content, including Premium articles .

Read more at www.pressandjournal.co.uk

Why You Should Add Walnuts To Your Diet

Why You Should Add Walnuts To Your Diet

Searching for a quick and easy way to boost your diet without making the biggest of changes? Walnuts might be just what you need. Here’s why.

How Walnuts Can Help Boost Your Immune System

Usually found in bread, stir-fries, smoothies, salads, chocolate and of course breakfast bowls, walnuts are a delicious addition to any meal that has it since their crunchy texture comes alongside a distinctive taste. They’re also easily found in marketplaces and are a cheap option to help make your snacks more delicious. But did you know that walnuts are more than just a crunchy addition to your breakfast bowl?

That’s right because research has proven time and again that they’re a healthy snack on their own and they’re an effective way to help add some easy but real benefits to your diet . But how exactly do they benefit your immune system? Here’s how:

Promotes gut health

Eating walnuts can help increase beneficial and good bacteria in your gut, which in turn helps combat the increased risk of obesity, heart disease and certain types of cancer by helping decrease inflammation.

Helps your mood and brain function

Walnuts also have large amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, which helps in our brain development and function. They also help improve our memory and are known to help boost the mood of people suffering from depression and anxiety.

Lowers type 2 diabetes risk

Although fairly high in calories, walnuts can actually help curb appetite and decrease hunger. This in turn, helps you from gaining weight and lowers the risk of suffering from type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, previous study has also shown that a diet with walnut oil is known to help improve blood sugar levels.

Improves male fertility

It may be a lesser known fact, but walnuts can also help improve male fertility. Walnuts do this by having a high amount of antioxidants, which help fight free radicals and stop sperm membrane damage.

Supports healthy aging

Lastly, walnuts are also high in fiber, essential minerals, essential vitamins and fats that help promote natural and healthy aging.

Read more at www.msn.com

Getting a daily dose of exercise can boost the brain power of obese and overweight individuals

Getting a daily dose of exercise can boost the brain power of obese and overweight individuals

( Natural News ) Exercise improves brain functions in overweight and obese individuals , according to a recent review. Published in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience , it revealed that exercise altered the size of different areas of the brain, such as the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus.

Exercise also enhanced the structural integrity of white matter, the tissue in the brain that controls vital cognitive functions like learning and memory. What does the brain have to do with obesity?

Obesity has become a serious and pervasive health problem in the U.S. According to recent reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), obesity-related conditions like heart disease, stroke and Type 2 diabetes are some of the leading causes of preventable premature death .

Besides its strong link to diet and nutrition, experts have established that this metabolic disorder is also tied to brain health and brain functions .

The brain responds to several internal and external signals to let it know when it is time to eat. Appetizing smells, for instance, might trigger our appetites. Whether or not you feel like eating, food advertisements and emotional triggers like stress can also increase appetite.

Our bodies produce hormones, such as insulin and leptin, that affect appetite and metabolic rate, which determines how fast you burn calories. These hormones go straight to the area of the brain called the hypothalamus, which is responsible for regulating signals about hunger, appetite and fullness.

Each hormone performs specific roles. For example, leptin, which is released from fat cells, controls hunger and metabolism. Insulin, on the other hand, which comes from the pancreas, determines whether or not there is enough sugar in the body for energy production.

In obese individuals, the high amount of fat disrupts the functions of and the balance between these hormones. As the amount of fat increases, so do the leptins. As a result, an individual might have an increased appetite despite being full. This situation often leads to overeating and frequent snacking in between meals.

Meanwhile, excess sugar from foods causes cells to become resistant to insulin, which leads to unhampered weight gain. (Related: Improve your insulin resistance with resistance exercise .)

Past research has also shown that too much fat can lead to an inflamed hypothalamus. This type of fat-induced inflammation can damage cells in the brain that regulate appetite and fullness. Excess fat can also alter brain structure and trigger the premature onset of cognitive impairment and age-related brain conditions like Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease . Exercise improves brain function

Besides nutrition interventions like diets and fasting, exercise is also prescribed as a form of weight-loss intervention for proper weight management. But a team of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh found evidence that exercise also improves brain health and brain functions in overweight and obese individuals.

To understand the connection between exercise and brain health, the team reviewed several studies that linked obesity, physical activity, brain structure and cognitive functions.

When the researchers assessed the overall quality of the results reported by the studies, they found that exercise increased the volume of gray matter in the prefrontal cortex. The gray matter is responsible for brain functions like muscle control, speech and decision-making.

In addition, the team found evidence that exercise enhanced the structure of white matter, which supports neural communication. Exercise interventions also led to significant improvements in learning and visuospatial processing in obese individuals.

Based on the findings of their investigation, the researchers thus concluded that exercise improves overall brain structure and enhances several cognitive functions. They also emphasized that exercise shows potential as an effective method of intervention for brain aging and cognitive decline.

Read the latest articles on brain health and brain research studies at Brain.news .

Sources include:

CDC.gov

Read more at www.naturalnews.com

Sonus Complete Reviews – Does Gregory Peters Tinnitus Supplement Work?

Sonus Complete Reviews – Does Gregory Peters Tinnitus Supplement Work?

Sonus Complete by Gregory Peters is a potent formula that helps in eradicating tinnitus. The dietary supplement has been designed using natural ingredients, the formula of which has been sourced from the Mensa society. The best part about this product is that it has been manufactured using the safest practices of maintaining health and hygiene.

Get Sonus Complete Tinnitus Formula For an Exclusive Discounted Price Today

Sonus Complete Review: Are you facing trouble with tinnitus? Initially, you might think that the constant ringing sound in your ears would go away on its own. However, with time you may realize that sometimes it is here to stick. What can you do when this happens? You have two options either choose a medication or go for a dietary supplement which is natural.

Without doubt, a supplement is a better option because it contains only ingredients which have been taken from nature. But, even when youre going for a natural product you must be careful that you are not choosing one which lacks quality. This brings to our attention Sonus Complete for tinnitus.

Formulated by Gregory Peters, this is a dietary formula which can put an end to your tinnitus woes. The product contains herbal ingredients as well as vitamins and minerals for improving your condition and silencing the ringing sound in your ears once and for all. Lets learn more about it below.

(Upto 30% Off Today) Buy Sonus Complete For The Lowest Price Available Online

Noteworthy Features

There are many qualities of this supplement which showcase it as one which is preferable than others. Lets take a look at the defining features of Sonus Complete pills for tinnitus here:

You are given only natural ingredients

There are several advantages of going for a natural supplement. The two main ones are that firstly, such a product works in the favor of your body as it doesnt go against its natural processes. Secondly, a natural supplement is also likely to have little to no risk of reactions.

This product comprises of the best ingredients. These agents have been taken from the most reliable sources. Furthermore, they have also been tested thoroughly before being included in the formula. In fact, the formula itself has been sourced from the Mensa society which shows it as credible.

You have no reason to worry about the quality

When it comes to the quality of this product, that too is excellent. The company behind the product has followed the best practices to ensure that the end product is one that is potent and free of impurities. In fact, the supplement does not contain any filler content or chemicals.

Other than this, quality is also great since the product has been developed after a lot of research has gone into it. You see, the ingredients as well as the approach of the product are both backed by science.

Using the supplement is easy

Last but not least, adding this supplement to your routine is not something that would cost you a lot of time or effort. This is because it is available in the form of capsules. You are only supposed to take these on a daily basis with water just as you have been recommended.

You can find the dosage as well as the details on how you are supposed to use this product, by taking a look at its label. The best part is that, unlike in the case of recipes for relieving a symptom, youre not supposed to waste time in preparing some lengthy beverage.

Read Sonus Complete Customer Reviews and Testimonials Before Buying: This May Change Your Mind

Ingredients

As has been mentioned above, the composition of this product is reliable since it is completely natural. You don’t have to worry about any risk of side effects. Let’s take a look at some of the ingredients that are the primary ones in Sonus Complete tinnitus supplement:

1. Hibiscus and hawthorn berries

These are the major ingredients which fight tinnitus. They also support clarity in hearing. Hibiscus in the formula also improves the working of your central nervous system. Whereas hawthorn berries may help reduce panic attacks which are common with anxiety.

2. Juniper berry and uva ursi

The product contains two more ingredients, both of which clean out impurities from your brain. By doing so, these agents improve your brain health.

3. Vitamin C

This vitamin has been added for the purpose of supporting the eradication of tinnitus so that you can live a peaceful life. Furthermore, the nutrient also protects your brain from memory loss.4. GarlicThis herb is also included in the supplement. It decreases the risk of dementia as well as boosts your memory. Furthermore, it also helps you sleep better along with reducing brain fog and dizziness.5. Olive leavesThese are the third ingredients of the formula which boost your memory as well as reduce the risk of mental disorders. Furthermore, they reduce brain confusion and improve your mood, two concerns which often accompany tinnitus.6. Green teaGreen tea in the formula is rich in antioxidant content. For this reason, it is able to fight oxidative stress and improve the neural connections of the brain. In short, it boosts brain health along with providing other benefits.7. Vitamins B12, B6, and bucha leavesThis is the last bunch of ingredients that this formula contains. What it does is that it improves your brains neural connections. Plus, it improves mental clarity, and sharpens your mental acuity along with doing the main task of getting rid of tinnitus.Where to Buy and Cost?You may only purchase this product from the official website: here’s the link sonuscomplete.com . It is not available on Amazon, Walmart, Walgreens, GNC, or any other local or online stores. Make sure to get the real and authentic formula from the official website only.There are three packages of Sonus Complete pills available. In the first deal, you get one bottle of the product for $69. In the second deal, you get 3 bottles of the product with the price of each reduced to $59. And in the third deal, you get 6 bottles of […]

Read more at apnews.com