6 Best Natural Adderall Alternatives for Adults in 2024

6 Best Natural Adderall Alternatives for Adults in 2024

In recent years, there has been a growing interest in natural alternatives to prescription medications like Adderall. This shift comes from a desire to avoid side effects associated with pharmaceuticals and to embrace a more holistic approach to health. As we step into 2024, several natural supplements have emerged as potential substitutes for those seeking to manage ADHD symptoms or enhance cognitive performance without the use of traditional stimulant medications. Below we explore six top natural Adderall alternatives that adults might consider.

1.Ginkgo Biloba

Ginkgo Biloba is an ancient plant extract known for its cognitive-enhancing properties. Studies suggest that it can improve focus, memory, and executive functions, which makes it a popular alternative for adults looking for a natural cognitive boost.

2.L-Theanine with Caffeine

Found naturally in green tea, L-Theanine has calming properties that can moderate the jitters often associated with caffeine intake. When combined, L-Theanine and caffeine can provide smooth energy and concentration improvements, mimicking some of the beneficial effects of Adderall.

3.Rhodiola Rosea

Rhodiola Rosea is an adaptogen herb acclaimed for its stress-reducing and brain-boosting benefits. It supports the body’s stress response system and can enhance mental stamina, providing an alternative way to improve focus and productivity.

4.Bacopa Monnieri

An herb commonly used in Ayurvedic medicine, Bacopa Monnieri may support cognitive processes such as learning rate, memory formation, and verbal recall. It’s considered one of the most effective natural nootropics available.

5.Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential nutrients that play a significant role in brain health and function. High concentrations are found in fish oil supplements, which can support brain cell structure and neurotransmitter function, translating into improved focus and cognition.

6.Ashwagandha

Ashwagandha is another adaptogen that has been shown to help reduce anxiety and stress while improving concentration and energy levels. Its potential positive impact on brain health and cortisol levels makes it a sought-after natural stimulant-free alternative to pharmaceutical options like Adderall.

While these natural supplements show promise as potential alternatives to Adderall for cognitive enhancement or ADHD symptom management in adults, it’s important to consult with a healthcare provider before making any changes to your medication regimen. Natural doesn’t always mean risk-free, so professional guidance is crucial when considering these options.

Read more at www.thetechedvocate.org

AI Reveals Brain Oscillations for Memory and Disease

AI Reveals Brain Oscillations for Memory and Disease

Summary: A recent study showcases a significant leap in the study of brain oscillations, particularly ripples, which are crucial for memory organization and are affected in disorders like epilepsy and Alzheimer’s. Researchers have developed a toolbox of AI models trained on rodent EEG data to automate and enhance the detection of these oscillations, proving their efficacy on data from non-human primates.

This breakthrough, stemming from a collaborative hackathon, offers over a hundred optimized machine learning models, including support vector machines and convolutional neural networks, freely available to the scientific community. This development opens new avenues in neurotechnology applications, especially in diagnosing and understanding neurological disorders.

Key Facts:

> AI-Driven Innovation: The study introduces a toolbox of AI models capable of detecting brain ripples, key in memory organization and neurological diseases.

Cross-Species Application: Initially trained on rodent data, these models have been successfully tested on non-human primate EEG data, indicating potential for human application.

Open-Source Contribution: Over a hundred machine learning models from the project are now openly available for research use and further development, demonstrating the collaborative spirit of the scientific community.

Source: CSIC

The study of brain oscillations has advanced our understanding of brain function. Ripples are a type of fast oscillations underlying the organization of memories. They are affected in neurological disorders such as epilepsy and Alzheimer’s.

For this reason, they are considered an electroencephalographic (EEG) biomarker. However, ripples exhibit various waveforms and properties that can be missed by standard spectral methods. The model toolbox emerged as a result of a hackathon, which resulted in a short list for the best detection models. Credit: Neuroscience News Recently, the neuroscience community called for the need to better automate, harmonize, and improve the detection of ripples across a range of tasks and species. In the study, the authors used recordings obtained in laboratory mice to train a toolbox of machine learning models.

“We have tested the ability of these models using data from non-human primates that were collected at Vanderbilt University (Nashville, USA) by Saman Abbaspoor and lab leader Kari Hoffman as part of the Brain Initiative.

“We found that it is possible to use rodent EEG data to train AI algorithms that can be applied to data from primates and possibly human, provided the same type of recording techniques are used.”, De la Prida explains.

The model toolbox emerged as a result of a hackathon, which resulted in a short list for the best detection models. These architectures were then harmonized and optimized by the authors who now provide all codes and data openly to the research community.

Models include some of the best-known supervised learning architectures, such as support vector machines, decision trees, and convolutional neural networks.

“We have identified more than one hundred possible models from the different architectures that are now available for application or retraining by other researchers.”, commented Andrea Navas Olivé and Adrián Rubio, who are first authors of the work.

“This bank of AI models will provide new applications in the field of neurotechnologies and can be useful for detection and analysis of high-frequency oscillations in pathologies such as epilepsy, where they are considered clinical markers” concludes De la Prida, who is part of the CSIC’s AI-HUB connection aimed at advancing the use of AI and its applications. About this AI and neuroscience research news

Author: Maria Gonzalez
Source: CSIC
Contact: Maria Gonzalez – CSIC
Image: The image is credited to Neuroscience News

Original Research: Open access.
“ A machine learning toolbox for the analysis of sharp-wave ripples reveals common waveform features across species ” by Kari Hoffman et al. Communications Biology

Abstract

A machine learning toolbox for the analysis of sharp-wave ripples reveals common waveform features across species

The study of sharp-wave ripples has advanced our understanding of memory function, and their alteration in neurological conditions such as epilepsy is considered a biomarker of dysfunction.

Sharp-wave ripples exhibit diverse waveforms and properties that cannot be fully characterized by spectral methods alone.

Here, we describe a toolbox of machine-learning models for automatic detection and analysis of these events.

The machine-learning architectures, which resulted from a crowdsourced hackathon, are able to capture a wealth of ripple features recorded in the dorsal hippocampus of mice across awake and sleep conditions. When applied to data from the macaque hippocampus, these models are able to generalize detection and reveal shared properties across species.

We hereby provide a user-friendly open-source toolbox for model use and extension, which can help to accelerate and standardize analysis of sharp-wave ripples, lowering the threshold for its adoption in biomedical applications.Join our Newsletter I agree to have my personal information transferred to AWeber for Neuroscience Newsletter ( more information )Sign up to receive our recent neuroscience headlines and summaries sent to your email once a day, totally free.

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Brain Waves at Night: The Key to Preventing Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s?

Brain Waves at Night: The Key to Preventing Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s?

Scientists have discovered that the brain’s activity during sleep, particularly the generation of rhythmic brain waves, is crucial for flushing out waste. This process could offer new strategies for preventing neurodegenerative diseases and improving sleep efficiency, potentially reducing the necessity for long sleep durations. Findings could pave the way for innovative strategies to tackle Alzheimer’s and various other neurological disorders.

There lies a paradox in sleep. Its apparent tranquility juxtaposes with the brain’s bustling activity. The night is still, but the brain is far from dormant. During sleep, brain cells produce bursts of electrical pulses that cumulate into rhythmic waves – a sign of heightened brain cell function.

But why is the brain active when we are resting?

Slow brain waves are associated with restful, refreshing sleep. And now, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that brain waves help flush waste out of the brain during sleep. Individual nerve cells coordinate to produce rhythmic waves that propel fluid through dense brain tissue, washing the tissue in the process.

“These neurons are miniature pumps. Synchronized neural activity powers fluid flow and removal of debris from the brain,” explained first author Li-Feng Jiang-Xie, PhD, a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Pathology & Immunology. “If we can build on this process, there is the possibility of delaying or even preventing neurological diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, in which excess waste – such as metabolic waste and junk proteins – accumulate in the brain and lead to neurodegeneration.”

The findings were recently published in the journal Nature . Brain Cells and Waste Removal

Brain cells orchestrate thoughts, feelings, and body movements, and form dynamic networks essential for memory formation and problem-solving. But to perform such energy-demanding tasks, brain cells require fuel. Their consumption of nutrients from the diet creates metabolic waste in the process.

“It is critical that the brain disposes of metabolic waste that can build up and contribute to neurodegenerative diseases,” said Jonathan Kipnis, PhD, the Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Distinguished Professor of Pathology & Immunology and a BJC Investigator. Kipnis is the senior author on the paper. “We knew that sleep is a time when the brain initiates a cleaning process to flush out waste and toxins it accumulates during wakefulness. But we didn’t know how that happens. These findings might be able to point us toward strategies and potential therapies to speed up the removal of damaging waste and to remove it before it can lead to dire consequences.” The Mechanism of Brain Cleaning

But cleaning the dense brain is no simple task. Cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the brain enters and weaves through intricate cellular webs, collecting toxic waste as it travels. Upon exiting the brain, contaminated fluid must pass through a barrier before spilling into the lymphatic vessels in the dura mater – the outer tissue layer enveloping the brain underneath the skull. But what powers the movement of fluid into, through, and out of the brain?

Studying the brains of sleeping mice, the researchers found that neurons drive cleaning efforts by firing electrical signals in a coordinated fashion to generate rhythmic waves in the brain, Jiang-Xie explained. They determined that such waves propel the fluid movement.

The research team silenced specific brain regions so that neurons in those regions didn’t create rhythmic waves. Without these waves, fresh cerebrospinal fluid could not flow through the silenced brain regions and trapped waste couldn’t leave the brain tissue. Enhancing the Brain’s Cleaning Process

“One of the reasons that we sleep is to cleanse the brain,” Kipnis said. “And if we can enhance this cleansing process, perhaps it’s possible to sleep less and remain healthy. Not everyone has the benefit of eight hours of sleep each night, and loss of sleep has an impact on health. Other studies have shown that mice that are genetically wired to sleep less have healthy brains. Could it be because they clean waste from their brains more efficiently? Could we help people living with insomnia by enhancing their brain’s cleaning abilities so they can get by on less sleep?”

Brain wave patterns change throughout sleep cycles. Of note, taller brain waves with larger amplitude move fluid with more force. The researchers are now interested in understanding why neurons fire waves with varying rhythmicity during sleep and which regions of the brain are most vulnerable to waste accumulation.

“We think the brain-cleaning process is similar to washing dishes,” neurobiologist Jiang-Xie explained. “You start, for example, with a large, slow, rhythmic wiping motion to clean soluble wastes splattered across the plate. Then you decrease the range of the motion and increase the speed of these movements to remove particularly sticky food waste on the plate. Despite the varying amplitude and rhythm of your hand movements, the overarching objective remains consistent: to remove different types of waste from dishes. Maybe the brain adjusts its cleaning method depending on the type and amount of waste.”

Reference: “Neuronal dynamics direct cerebrospinal fluid perfusion and brain clearance” by Li-Feng Jiang-Xie, Antoine Drieu, Kesshni Bhasiin, Daniel Quintero, Igor Smirnov and Jonathan Kipnis, 28 February 2024, Nature .
DOI: 10.1038/s41586-024-07108-6

The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Read more at scitechdaily.com

Debunking the 10% Brain Myth

Debunking the 10% Brain Myth

Many people believe that we only use 10% of our brains, but this idea isn’t supported by science. This article will explore where this myth came from, why it’s so appealing, and what the truth really is about our brain’s capabilities. Despite being disproven by modern neuroscience, the myth continues to capture our imagination, suggesting we have vast unused potential. Let’s uncover the facts and understand how our brains truly function. Origins of the 10% Brain Usage Myth

The myth that humans only use 10% of their brains is a widely accepted notion, yet thoroughly unfounded in scientific fact. Its origins are murky but can be traced back to the early 20th century, when it was mistakenly propagated by misinterpretations of neurological research. Over time, this myth has been perpetuated by popular culture, self-help industries, and even some educators, without any empirical evidence to support it. Fact Check

Claim: Humans only use 10% of their brains

Description: A widely circulated belief suggests that humans only utilize 10% of their brain’s capacity, implying that there is a vast amount of untapped potential. This belief, often propagated by popular culture and self-help industries, has been thoroughly debunked by modern neuroscience, which demonstrates active use and function across nearly all parts of the brain.

Rating: False

Rating Explanation: The claim that humans only use 10% of their brains is not supported by scientific evidence. Research, especially neuroimaging studies, show that much more of the brain is active even during simple tasks.

One probable source for this myth is the work of psychologist William James, who in the 1900s, suggested that individuals are not making full use of their mental capacities. However, James never specified any percentage, which indicates the 10% figure could have been an arbitrary embellishment that was added as the statement was passed along. Additionally, the advent of neuroimaging has debunked this myth by showing that, even during simple tasks, much more than 10% of the brain is active.

Another contributing factor to the persistence of this myth is its appeal to the imagination and its implication that achieving untapped potential is merely a matter of tapping into the dormant 90% of our brainpower. This notion is inherently appealing, suggesting a vast reservoir of untapped intellectual and cognitive abilities just waiting to be unlocked. However, neuroscience has repeatedly shown that nearly all parts of the brain have a known function and are active at various times depending on the activity being performed.

The endurance of the 10% brain usage myth also reflects a misunderstanding of brain plasticity and the brain’s operational efficiency. Brain plasticity refers to the organ’s ability to adapt to new experiences, a process that engages various areas of the brain beyond any simplistic fractional capacity. Moreover, the human brain is an organ of remarkable efficiency; its structure and functionality have evolved to maximize its operational capabilities and metabolic energy consumption. Utilizing only a fraction of its capacity would contradict the principles of evolutionary biology that govern organ development.

In exploring the rationale behind the myth, it’s essential to consider the allure of the unknown that characterizes much of the human experience. Myths like these flourish in environments where curiosity meets a lack of understanding. They offer simplistic explanations for complex phenomena and provide a framework for interpreting the vast capabilities and mysteries of the human mind. Despite being debunked, the myth persists, a testament to the enduring appeal of human potential and the quest for self-improvement.

The perpetuation of the 10% myth serves as a reminder of the importance of critical thinking and the need for public education in scientific literacy. Debunking such myths is crucial in fostering a more scientifically informed public, capable of distinguishing fact from fiction in an age dominated by an overload of information. While the allure of unlocking ‘hidden’ potential is enticing, it is through the diligent application of scientifically sound principles and practices that true cognitive and intellectual growth occurs. Scientific Evidence Against the Myth

Modern neuroscience tells us that the human brain’s capacity is far more complex and capable than the outdated myth of using only 10% of our brain power. Instead of focusing on debunked myths, current research delves into the brain’s real capabilities, exploring how it processes information, adapts to new challenges, and enables human beings to learn and grow throughout their lives.

One of the brain’s remarkable qualities is its ability to reorganize itself by forming new neural connections. This process, known as neuroplasticity, occurs not just in childhood but throughout an individual’s lifetime. It allows the brain to compensate for injury, adjust to new experiences, and learn new information and skills. In essence, the brain’s adaptability is crucial for our ability to navigate the world, solve problems, and develop personal and collective knowledge.

Neuroscientists have also uncovered that each part of the brain holds specific functions, yet they work together in a sophisticated network. While certain areas might be responsible for language, others govern emotion or decision-making. This division of labor, known as functional specialization, demonstrates that far more than a mere 10% of the brain is constantly at work, even in simple daily tasks.

Another area of fascination in neuroscience is the exploration of the brain’s capacity for memory. The human brain can store a vast amount of information, from factual knowledge to personal memories, and even skills we don’t consciously think about, like riding a bicycle. This capacity for memory is not fixed but can expand and change with experience, a phenomenon linked closely to the brain’s plasticity.

Moreover, the speed at which the brain processes information is astounding. It interprets signals from our senses, allows us to react to the world around us, and fuels our thoughts and creativity. This rapid processing capability is essential for understanding complex environments and making quick decisions.

However, despite these incredible capabilities, the brain also has its limits. Factors such as stress, lack of sleep, and poor nutrition can negatively affect brain function, highlighting the importance of taking care of both our physical and mental health.

In conclusion, […]

Read more at www.truthorfiction.com

Don’t Give Up on Your Memory No Matter Your Age

Don’t Give Up on Your Memory No Matter Your Age

Key points

Memory loss seems like an inevitable feature of aging, especially with current news stories.

New research shows how these attitudes about aging can penetrate one’s confidence in one’s own memory.

Some effort plus self-confidence may be all a person needs to keep their memory in shape no matter their age.

Memory is in the news with the release of the Special Counsel Report claiming that President Joe Biden suffers from severe memory lapses. It goes without saying that these claims were made without the benefit of any psychological testing. However, this fact seems to escape public attention . Apart from any political damage this inflicts on Biden, there are statements in the report that would lead anyone, President or not, to worry about their memory as they age. One quote from the New York Times article particularly stands out as emerging from the report: “It would be difficult to convince a jury that ‘a former president well into his 80s’ was guilty of a felony that ‘requires a mental state of willfulness.'”

Such statements tap into the general belief age is associated with inevitable mental decline, a view that permeates many people’s everyday speech. Indeed, reading about the assessment of Biden’s memory could make anyone, whether 80-ish or not, wonder if there is no way to escape age’s toll on your memory.

Yet, how sure are researchers that memory actually does fall apart in a steady drip-drip of loss? Even one of the world’s greatest experts on cognitive aging, Baycrest Academy’s Fergus Craik (2023), suggests that there is a great deal of neuroplasticity in later life and that much of what goes wrong in memory isn’t due to faulty recall. Instead, faulty encoding of new information is the culprit, a process further hampered when people don’t put enough energy into trying to lock this new information in place. As such, the data fit the well-known adage about memory in general: “If you don’t encode, you can’t retrieve.” Put your effort into encoding, and you could avoid what seems like an inevitable mental decay. How Can Encoding Be Improved?

There may be neurophysiological changes in later life that hamper that all-important process of encoding, as Craik also points out, so not all of the poorer performance of older adults can be attributed to a lack of effort in the data entry stage of memory. However, given that your brain will do what your brain wants to do, how can you nudge it to become more efficient?

A new study by Hong Kong Technical Institute’s Michael Yeung (2024) provides some potential answers. Related to “effort” is the process known as “metamemory,” or your thoughts and beliefs about how to snap your mental powers into shape. Specifically, “the knowledge and monitoring of one’s own memory” includes control, in which you “deploy strategies to enhance subsequent learning and memory.” When you go through that all-important encoding process of new information, you can decide how hard it will be to recall it later, and when you then need to retrieve it, you can similarly try to predict whether the information will come back to you.

You can relate to this process if you think about the increasingly common two-factor authentication that many apps and online sites use to validate your identity . You see the six-digit code pop up on your phone or in your email, and then it’s up to you to remember it long enough to key it in. When you see those numbers, do you panic and think there’s no way they’ll stick around long enough in your head to recall them, even for a few seconds? Or does this seem so easy that it doesn’t trouble you at all?

Prior research, Yeung maintains, hasn’t come to a clear set of conclusions about how effective monitoring is when it comes to real-life situations such as these, or at least as tested in the lab. Describing this effect as “elusive,” he suggests that part of the reason for the lack of clarity is that there’s more than simple memory involved in metamemory. This ability to think about your thinking comes from “ executive functioning ,” a feature associated with the quality of your brain’s ability to plan and organize. The goal of his study was to disentangle the two possibilities. Building Confidence to Build Metamemory

The Hong Kong researcher believed that not only would executive functioning and metamemory predict cognitive performance in his older participants but that feelings of confidence could become critical as well. He divided the standard paired-associate learning task (associating faces with pictures) into the phases of judgments of learning (JOL), or predicting the outcome of performance, from feeling of knowing (FOK), or thinking an item was familiar. Additionally, he added retrospective confidence judgments (RCFs) into the study’s model, to see how people could help or hinder their performance through this bit of mental cheerleading.

The 104 Chinese participants in the study ranged from 18 to 79 years old, stratified by age and sex into three groups. In the test phase of the learning task, participants answered questions about the recall-ability of each pair (JOL) as well as their belief that the face was one they had seen (FOK). Then they provided a simple confidence rating of whether they were correct or not on a 1-9 scale.

You could practice this task yourself the next time you have one of those authenticator screens pop up, and this will give you a sense of what participants were asked to do. The executive functioning task that the research team gave to participants also includes one you can try out yourself, namely, generating as many different animals as you can in one minute.

On average, older adults did remember fewer pairs, but they also had high confidence in both JOL and FOK. The predictive model the authors tested showed, more importantly, that higher confidence ratings, plus better executive functioning, were significant predictors of memory scores among the older adult participants. As the authors concluded: “Thus, the increased confidence […]

Read more at www.psychologytoday.com

Natural ways to manage aches and pains

Natural ways to manage aches and pains

Here are some drug-free ways to manage aches and pains that have been recommended by naturopathic doctors.

For best results, speak with a naturopathic doctor who can help determine the root cause of your problem and prescribe a treatment that will work for you. Some of the natural treatments available include: Acupressure and therapeutic massage

Acupressure is a type of massage therapy – manual pressure is applied to specific pressure points on your body, similar to acupuncture – except that fingers are used instead of needles.

Deep tissue massage is known for its positive effects on back and neck pain, as well as sports injuries. Therapeutic massage may also relieve stress and help with health conditions, such as high blood pressure and fibromyalgia – a chronic (long-lasting) disorder that causes pain and tenderness throughout the body, as well as fatigue and trouble sleeping. Yoga

Yoga is a mind-body therapy that is often recommended to treat not only back pain but also the stress that accompanies it. Various yoga poses improve muscle flexibility, increase the body’s release of endorphins that block the nerve cells that receive pain signals (essentially turning off your pain), promote relaxation and improve your confidence and sense of self-control. Music therapy

Music is commonly incorporated into various modes of exercise or regular physical activity by competitive athletes and recreational exercisers alike.

A study published in the British Journal of General Practic e is one of many studies that provide considerable evidence of music helping to decrease pain levels. Researchers explain that when you listen to music, your brain releases endorphins that block the nerve cells that receive pain signals , essentially turning off your pain.

In another study published in the Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology , researchers found that listening to music while exercising often results in improved performance . Natural herbs and spices

Mother Nature has provided these natural pain management solutions – e.g., aloe vera, boswellia (Indian frankincense), chamomile, chili peppers, cinnamon, cloves, devil’s claw, echinacea, eucalyptus, garlic, ginger, ginkgo biloba, ginseng, lavender, maritime pine bark, peppermint, rosemary, turmeric and white willow bark – that are gentle to your body and just as effective at relieving pain as prescription medications. (Related: These 7 herbs can help you through life’s aches and pains .) Heat and cold therapy

Alternating heat and cold therapy helps reduce exercise-induced muscle pain or osteoarthritis effectively.

Cold therapy (ice packs are a great choice for the first 72 hours after an injury) helps reduce the temperature of the skin and muscles and decreases blood flow and metabolic processes, which, in turn, reduces inflammation or swelling that causes the pain.

Heat therapy, on the other hand, does the opposite, thus soothing stiff joints and relaxing the muscles.

Note that neither option should be used for more than 10-15 minutes at a time , according to the U.S. Pain Foundation. Seek a professional

Consulting with a licensed natural health practitioner to find the right treatment for your health issues is always the best choice. To find a licensed naturopath near you, visit the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians’ (AANP) website .

AlternativeMedicine.news has more stories about natural remedies for various ailments.

Watch the following video to learn about a natural pain-killing plant that you can find in most backyards in every U.S. state . This video is from the Saranra channel on Brighteon.com . More related stories:

Not just a cute plant, the bunny ears cactus relieves pain naturally.

Tamarind more effective than standard analgesics, study shows.

The cabbage tree relieves pain and inflammation without any of the side effects caused by conventional drugs.

Sources include:

VerywellHealth.com

MedicalNewsToday.com

NIAMS.NIH.gov

Healthline.com

NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov 1

NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov 2 USPainFoundation.org Naturopathic.org Brighteon.com

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Bioactive compounds in GINKGO BILOBA found to improve cognitive recovery after stroke

Bioactive compounds in GINKGO BILOBA found to improve cognitive recovery after stroke

A preliminary study revealed that ischemic stroke survivors had faster and better recovery of cognitive function after receiving injections of ginkgo diterpene lactone meglumine (GDLM) – a combination of the biologically active components of the “living fossil,” ginkgo biloba.

One of the three main strokes, ischemic stroke occurs when a blood clot (called a thrombus) blocks or clogs an artery leading to the brain.

GDLM is made of extracts from ginkgo biloba, an herb used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and considered the oldest living tree species in the world. GDLM is composed of ginkgolides A, B and K and has been widely used in the treatment of ischemic stroke in China. (Related: Ginkgo biloba shows potential value in the treatment of over 100 diseases .) How the study was done

In early 2023, researchers tested the effects of GDLM on more than 3,000 survivors of mild to moderate stroke at 100 centers in China and analyzed their cognitive recovery. Most of the patients’ cognitive status was reported as “moderately impaired” using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale (MoCA), with an average score of 17 out of 30.

About half of the stroke survivors were randomly selected to receive daily intravenous injections of 25 milligrams (mg) of GDLM for 14 days, while the other half received daily intravenous placebo injections.

Capital Medical University Clinical Epidemiology Assistant Professor Dr. Anxin Wang at the Beijing Tiantan Hospital said: “If our positive results are confirmed in other trials, GDLM injections may someday be used to improve cognitive function for patients after ischemic stroke.” What the researchers found

Compared to initial cognitive screening assessment scores, the researchers reported that: By day 14, stroke survivors who received the GDLM injections had improved cognitive scores at an average of 3.93 points – 3.62 points higher than those who received placebo injections.

By day 90, those who received the GDLM injections had even more improved cognitive scores at an average of 5.51 points – 5.04 points higher than those who received the placebo treatment.

Wang said: “The proportion of patients who reached a clinically significant level of improvement was 20 percent higher in the GDLM group – indicating that GDLM injections may improve cognitive function in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Since the follow-up time in this study was only 90 days, the longer-term effect of GDLM injections requires longer-term research.”

Wang further noted that GDLM shows a neuroprotective effect through multiple mechanisms, such as expanding brain blood vessels, improving the tolerance of brain cells to hypoxia (inadequate oxygen) and increasing cerebral blood flow. Other studies have also found that GDLM can promote the release of chemicals that help prevent neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

Published in JAMA Network Open , the study shows that ginkgo biloba’s active compounds exert a variety of neuroprotective and reparative effects that can help maintain the blood-brain barrier; reduce brain edema; improve energy metabolism; protect against oxidation, inflammation and apoptosis; and promote angiogenesis, or the formation of new blood vessels that normally supports wound healing and supplies oxygen-rich blood to organs and tissues.

The results of this randomized clinical trial were presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2024, which was held in Phoenix on Feb. 7-9.

Visit Herbs.news for more on the health benefits of Ginkgo biloba.

Learn about ” Ginkgo biloba’s brain benefits ” by watching the video below.

This video is from the Holistic Herbalist channel on Brighteon.com . More related stories:

Ginkgo biloba promotes better blood flow and a healthy brain.

Ginkgo biloba found to have neuroprotective effects against retinal degeneration.

Ginkgo biloba, resveratrol and cacao beans scientifically proven to combat cognitive decline.

Sources include:

Newsroom.Heart.org

Stroke.org.UK

ScienceDirect.com

Nature.com

JAMANetwork.com

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Revolutionary brain stimulation technique shows promise for treating brain disorders

The human brain’s adaptability to internal and external changes, known as neural plasticity, forms the foundation for understanding cognitive functions like memory and learning, as well as various neurological disorders. New research conducted by a team led by Dr. PARK Joo Min of the Center for Cognition and Sociality within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) unveils a novel technique that could transform the treatment landscape for brain disorders. The team developed a non-invasive brain stimulation method called Patterned Low-Intensity Low-Frequency Ultrasound (LILFUS), which holds tremendous potential for inducing long-lasting changes in brain function.

Traditionally, magnetic and electrical brain stimulation methods have been used to modulate brain function. However, these methods come with inherent limitations that restrict their spatial resolution and penetration depth, making it challenging to precisely stimulate specific brain regions with optimal efficacy. More invasive methods, such as those that require surgical procedures, exhibit superior control and therapeutic effects for specific deep brain stimulation, but they come with risks such as tissue damage, inflammation, and infection. These limitations have fueled the search for alternative approaches that can overcome these constraints and provide more efficient and precise modulation of brain function.

In the latest study unveiled by the IBS, researchers used ultrasound to enable precise stimulation of specific brain areas. Unlike electromagnetic waves, ultrasound has the advantage of being able to penetrate deep into the brain tissues. The researchers discovered that ultrasound stimulation can modulate neural plasticity — the brain’s ability to rewire itself — through the activation of key molecular pathways. Specifically, the study pinpointed the ultrasound’s effect on mechanosensitive calcium channels in astrocytes, which controls the cells’ ability to uptake calcium and release neurotransmitters.

LILFUS was designed based on specific ultrasound parameters that mimic the brainwave patterns of theta (5 Hz) and gamma (30 Hz) oscillations observed during learning and memory processes. The new tool allowed the researchers to either activate or deactivate specific brain regions at will — intermittent delivery of the ultrasound was found to induce long-term potentiation effects, while continuous patterns resulted in long-term depression effects.

One of the most promising aspects of this new technology is its ability to facilitate the acquisition of new motor skills. When the researchers delivered ultrasound stimulation to the cerebral motor cortex in mice, they observed significant improvements in motor skill learning and the ability to retrieve food. Interestingly, researchers were even able to change the forelimb preference of the mice. This suggests potential applications in rehabilitation therapies for stroke survivors and individuals with motor impairments.

The implications of this research extend far beyond motor function. It may be used to treat conditions such as depression, where altered brain excitability and plasticity are prominent features. With further exploration, LILFUS could be adapted for various brain stimulation protocols, offering hope for various conditions ranging from sensory impairments to cognitive disorders.

Dr. Park stated, “This study has not only developed a new and safe neural regulation technology with long-lasting effects but has also uncovered the molecular mechanism changes involved in brainwave-patterned ultrasound neural regulation.” He further conveyed, “We plan to continue follow-up studies to apply this technology for the treatment of brain disorders related to abnormal brain excitation and inhibition and for the enhancement of cognitive functions.”

Read more at www.sciencedaily.com

Talking fast linked to better brain health in old age

Photo by Connor Olson from Unsplash TORONTO, Ontario — It turns out that talking slowly and clearly may not be so great after all. Researchers from the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care and the University of Toronto have found that talking speed can serve as an important indicator of brain health – even more so than having a difficulty finding certain words in old age.

Study authors add this is one of the first studies to assess both the differences in natural speech and brain health among a group of healthy adults.

“Our results indicate that changes in general talking speed may reflect changes in the brain,” says Dr. Jed Meltzer, Baycrest’s Canada Research Chair in Interventional Cognitive Neuroscience and the lead author on this study, in a media release . “This suggests that talking speed should be tested as part of standard cognitive assessments to help clinicians detect cognitive decline faster and help older adults support their brain health as they age.”

This project included 125 healthy volunteers (ages 18-90). Participants filled out three distinct assessments. The first test was a picture-naming game, in which they had to answer questions about pictures while ignoring distracting words heard through headphones. For instance, while looking at an image of a mop, participants might have to answer: “Does it end in ‘p’?” – all while simultaneously hearing the word “broom” as a distraction. This approach allowed researchers to test peoples’ capacity to recognize an image and recall the name.

Then, researchers recorded participants as they described two complex images. Each picture was on display for a total of 60 seconds. Next, language performances underwent an analysis using AI-based software, provided by Winterlight Labs. Study authors analyzed how fast each participant spoke and how much they paused.

Finally, the last test entailed participants completing standard tests aimed at assessing mental abilities known to decline with age and show a link to dementia risk. More specifically, executive function, which refers to the ability to manage conflicting information, stay focused, and avoid distractions . Researchers have found that talking speed can serve as an important indicator of brain health (credit: University of Texas at Austin) As researchers predicted, many cognitive skills showed a clear decline with age, such as word-finding speed. Surprisingly, however, while the ability to recognize a picture and recall its name both tended to deteriorate with age, this development did not show an association with a decline in other mental abilities. In other words, the amount and length of pauses participants needed to find the right words showed no link to brain health .

Instead, how fast participants could name pictures predicted how fast they spoke in general, and both of those factors showed a link to executive function . So, the results suggest it isn’t pausing to find words that shows the strongest link to brain health, but the speed of speech surrounding pauses.

Although plenty of older people understandably grow concerned about their need to pause to search for words, these findings suggest such issues are nothing more than a normal part of growing old. The slowing down of normal speech, though, independent of pausing, may be a much more important indicator of brain health changes.

Moving forward, researchers would like to conduct the same tests with a group of participants over several years in order to analyze if speed speech is truly predictive of brain health for individuals as they age. The results of such studies could serve as vital support for the development of tools for detecting cognitive decline as early as possible. This would help clinicians and doctors prescribe interventions to help older patients maintain or even improve their brain health and cognition.

The study is published in the journal Aging Neuropsychology and Cognition.

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Draft law in France proposes exorbitant fine, jail time for OPPONENTS of COVID-19 injections

Draft law in France proposes exorbitant fine, jail time for OPPONENTS of COVID-19 injections

A draft law in France has put forward an exorbitant fine of €45,000 ($48,627) and three years’ jail time for individuals who speak out against the dangerous Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) injection.

Professor Michel Chossudovsky, the founder and director of the Center for Research on Globalization (CRG), expounded on this draft law in a Feb. 18 piece. He mentioned that on Feb. 14, the French National Assembly adopted a controversial draft law to fight what it called “sectarian drift.”

The French Interministerial Mission of Vigilance and Combat against Sectarian Drifts (MIVILUDES) defined the concept as “a diversion of freedom of thought, opinion or religion that violates public order.” In other words, sectarian drift pertains to ideas, opinions or actions that go against the dictates of a totalitarian government.

According to Chossudovsky, Article Four of the draft law seeks to extend the concept of sectarian drift to health and medicine by creating a new crime of “provocation to abstention from medical care.” Under this edict, “provocation” on a sick person to “abandon or refrain from following medical treatment” if this abandonment is presented as beneficial when it could lead to dangerous consequences is now punishable under the French Criminal Code. It also acknowledged that this sectarian draft increased dramatically during the COVID-19 pandemic and “the use of social networks.”

The CRG founder added that Article Four “aims to fight against ‘charlatans’ and ‘gurus 2.0,'” who allegedly promote on the internet methods presented as “miracle solutions” to cure serious diseases such as cancers. Often without scientific training and in defiance of science, they can drift toward behaviors of sectarian influence, the French government claimed.

Chossudovsky pointed out that French citizens engaging in these “provocations” could face “three years of imprisonment and a fine of €45,000 ($48,627).” But looking at it closely, Article Four of the draft law codifies punishment for opposition to medical tyranny and the COVID-19 vaccine – even though the document does not mention it explicitly. (Related: Opposition to mRNA injections now considered a CRIME in France, violators face 45,000 euro fine and 3 years in prison for questioning “the science.” ) France’s draft law criminalizes health freedom

The CRG founder and director further explained that sectarian drift “points to non-conformity in response to an official government narrative.” He continued: “[While] the draft law does not explicitly refer to the COVID-19 vaccine … it constitutes an abominable threat [as] it criminalizes the protest movement against the COVID-19 vaccine.”

French lawyer David Guyon also pointed out the absurdity of the draft law. “In reality, it is clear that anyone who has criticized vaccination against COVID-19 could be considered of having committed and offense,” he said. “This is why it must be fought.”

According to Chossudovsky, the draft law is the brainchild of French President Emmanuel Macron. It will be presented to the French Senate by Interior Minister Gerard Darmanin in the name of former Prime Minister Elisabeth Borne.

“What this decision … implies is that the lie has become the truth. You can be arrested for informing friends and neighbors that the COVID-19 vaccine is a toxic substance,” he remarked. “What we are witnessing is the outright ‘criminalization of the state apparatus’ – whereby politicians, members of parliament [and] senior government officials are routinely bribed, co-opted or threatened to abide by a diabolical project, which is literally destroying people’s lives worldwide.”

“The French government, the National Assembly and the Senate must be challenged by a mass movement across France and the European Union,” Chossudovsky concluded, calling on the French upper legislature to “dismiss the National Assembly’s adoption of the draft law.”

Head over to MedicalTyranny.com for more stories about laws criminalizing opposition to the COVID-19 injection.

Watch this video that discusses France’s new draft law that criminalizes opposition to COVID-19 vaccines.

This video is from the chriswillard777 channel on Brighteon.com . More related stories:

Vaccine pioneer France is now skeptical of coronavirus vaccines.

Thousands take to the streets in protest of COVID-19 vaccine passports in France.

French health minister threatens to make coronavirus vaccinations compulsory for health workers.

OBEY OR ELSE: French government wants all adults aged 24-59 to be forcibly vaccinated for covid.

Vaccine passport now MANDATORY in France, following more than a year of corporate media propagandists claiming the idea was a “conspiracy theory.”

Sources include:

GlobalResearch.ca

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How to boost neuron growth in the brain, aka neurogenesis

Improve neurogenesis
Dr Daniel Berg of the University of Aberdeen discusses neurons and what effects neurogenesis

For a long time, neuroscientists believed that the neurons you are born with are the neurons you have for the rest of your life, and any neuron lost will not be replaced. Recent research has shown that specific brain regions contain neural stem cells that can generate new neurons. In this talk, Dr Daniel Berg of the University of Aberdeen will discuss what we know about these stem cells and what we can do to activate them to generate more neurons.

CDC’s expansion of vaccination schedule for Americans sparks controversy

CDC’s expansion of vaccination schedule for Americans sparks controversy

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ‘s (CDC) decision to expand the vaccination schedule for Americans has sparked controversy.

According to a report by Natural Health 365 , “in recent years, the childhood injection schedule has expanded beyond addressing the diseases most commonly affecting children – such as measles, mumps and rubella.” True enough, the CDC has proposed further additions to the vaccination schedule. It released the updated schedule in September, which is months earlier than usual, to speed up insurance payments for the newly-recommended vaccines.

The updated schedule now includes several new diseases – monkeypox, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) hepatitis, human papillomavirus (HPV), flu and pneumococcal disease.

“The escalation in the number of shots administered at closely spaced intervals during childhood has raised significant concerns,” Natural Health 365 pointed out. “Some childhood advocacy groups are now questioning the CDC’s motives and the safety measures involved in recommending these alterations to the [vaccine] schedule.” (Related: RSV introduced into population by polio vaccines; now Pfizer’s RSV vaccines risk harming, killing people .)

Moreover, some critics have dubbed the escalating number of injections as “a risky medical experiment.” For example, children aged zero to 18 may now require up to 80 injections, representing a significant increase from the 1983 recommendation of just 11 shots.

They also argue that the CDC hasn’t subjected the entire childhood immunization schedule to thorough safety or efficacy testing. The public health agency is also in hot water for its prioritization of shots over broader public health concerns and its susceptibility to pharmaceutical influence. Several experts voice out opposition to CDC’s vaccine push

Several medical experts voiced out their opposition to the CDC’s expansion of the immunization schedule to include recent diseases.

“This amounts to nothing more than a very dangerous medical experiment foisted on America’s infants and children,” said Brian Hooker of Children’s Health Defense. He also noted that the CDC has never tested the efficacy or the safety of the entire childhood vaccination schedule.

“The CDC continues to function as a powerful promoter of vaccines, not as a protector of public health,” said integrative physician Dr. Mary Kelly Sutton. She added that there is little evidence of vaccines’ effectiveness and a lack of officially accepted research on their adverse effects.

“The CDC could give wise guidance on vaccines but has so far accepted ACIP [Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices] approvals without studies,” remarked Sutton, who who lost her license in three states for writing eight COVID-19 vaccine exemptions in California. “Universally, vaccines lack true placebo controls, and recently, lack human trials of any kind. The sad truth is pharma money rules the CDC, and the American people … are deceived and placed at risk.”

“It’s an outrage,” said pediatrician Dr. Michelle Perro. “It’s not necessary and they’re hurting our children.”

Head over to CDC.news to find more stories about the public health agency’s promotion of COVID-19 vaccines and other deadly injections.

Watch Dr. Janette Nesheiwat explain to Tucker Carlson why the COVID-19 vaccine shouldn’t be included in the CDC’s childhood immunization schedule .

This video is from the Chinese taking down EVIL CCP channel on Brighteon.com . More related stories:

VACCINES COST LIVES: Child mortality is HIGHER in developed nations that require more vaccines – new study.

Study: COVID-19 vaccines linked to increased risk of brain clots and stroke when combined with flu vaccines.

SMOKING GUN: CDC altered definition of “breakthrough” COVID infections following emails about “vaccine failure.”

CDC knowingly labeled accurate news stories about the dangers of COVID-19 vaccines “misinformation,” internal messages show.

SUPPRESSED: CDC scrapped draft alert warning of link between COVID-19 vaccines and myocarditis, deliberately keeping Americans in the dark about vaccine dangers.

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NaturalHealth365.com

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Scientists uncover brain mechanisms for social memory recall in mice

Scientists uncover brain mechanisms for social memory recall in mice

The human brain has the extraordinary ability to rapidly discern a stranger from someone familiar, even as it can simultaneously remember details about someone across decades of encounters. Now, in mouse studies, scientists at Columbia’s Zuckerman Institute have revealed how the brain elegantly performs both tasks.

“These findings are the first evidence that a single population of neurons can use different codes to represent novel and familiar individuals,” said co-corresponding author Stefano Fusi, PhD, professor of neuroscience at Columbia’s Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, a principal investigator at Columbia’s Zuckerman Institute and a member of Columbia’s Center for Theoretical Neuroscience.

In a paper published today in Neuron , Columbia scientists explored social memory, the ability to remember encounters with others. This form of memory consists of two distinct mental processes-;distinguishing novel and familiar individuals, and recalling details about those who are recognized. We can readily determine whether someone is familiar but may have difficulty in recollecting the details of where and how we know that individual, especially when encountered out of context.” Steven A. Siegelbaum, PhD, co-corresponding author, Chair of the Department of Neuroscience at Columbia’s Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons Prior work found it difficult to pinpoint how the brain performs both tasks, given their conflicting demands. The ability to detect whether somebody is familiar or not has to apply across many different locations and events, while recollection involves remembering many specific experiences regarding a given individual.

In the new study, the scientists investigated a brain area called CA2, part of the hippocampus, a pair of seahorse-shaped brain structures essential for memory. Dr. Siegelbaum previously made the groundbreaking discovery that CA2 neurons are specifically important for social memory.

The researchers analyzed the brains of mice using calcium imaging, a technique that relies on genetically altered cells-;in this case, in CA2-;that rapidly change color when active. Calcium imaging enabled Lara Boyle, a former MD-PhD student in the Siegelbaum lab and co-first author of the study, to precisely know which neurons they were examining.

“This helped clear up uncertainty from previous research when it came to distinguishing the mouse brain’s responses to novel and familiar individuals,” said Dr. Siegelbaum, the Gerald D. Fischbach, MD, Professor of Neuroscience and of Pharmacology, and a principal investigator at the Zuckerman Institute.

The scientists first recorded how the rodents’ CA2 cells reacted when they were exposed either to a pair of strangers or a pair of familiar littermates. They next used computational methods, led by Dr. Fusi’s team, to analyze the pattern of activity in roughly 400 to 600 neurons in CA2.

The scientists found the same population of neurons encoded memories of both familiar and unfamiliar individuals. Unexpectedly, the neurons used different patterns of activity depending on a mouse’s level of familiarity with another rodent.

When mice were exposed to other mice that were unknown to them, the resulting activity in CA2 was relatively simple or, in the scientists’ parlance, “low-dimensional.” It’s as if several members of an orchestra played the exact same notes, explained Dr. Fusi. In contrast, exposure to familiar littermates led to more complex, high-dimensional CA2 activity, as if the musicians all played different melodies.

The calculations and the simulations of the researchers suggest that the more complex, or higher-dimensional, neural activity can help the brain encode the detailed memories of past encounters with familiar individuals. In contrast, the simpler, or lower-dimensional activity can help the brain reliably identify novel individuals across different contexts.

“When you encounter someone new, you may use abstract categories to describe them in your head-;for instance, that’s a child, with brown hair, red backpack,” said postdoctoral research associate Lorenzo Posani, PhD, a co-first author on the study who led the computational analysis. “Then, as you get to know them, they become a specific person and personality.”

This fundamental discovery regarding the way in which details about others are encoded may shed light on disorders affecting memory.

“When we look at different mouse models of human diseases like schizophrenia or Alzheimer’s that are known to affect memory, we now can ask more precisely how the neural activity supporting familiarity detection and recollection might be altered,” Dr. Siegelbaum said. “Our hope is that what we have learned may lead to a better understanding of the types of interventions that can rescue memory deficits in those disorders.”

The paper, “Tuned geometries of hippocampal representations meet the computational demands of social memory,” was published online in Neuron on TK, 2024.

The full list of authors includes Lara M. Boyle, Lorenzo Posani, Sarah Irfan, Steven A. Siegelbaum and Stefano Fusi.

Source:

Columbia University

Journal reference:

Boyle, L. M., et al. (2024) Tuned geometries of hippocampal representations meet the computational demands of social memory. Neuron. doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2024.01.021 .

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Bio-inspired neuroprosthetics: Sending signals the brain can understand

Bio-inspired neuroprosthetics: Sending signals the brain can understand

Neuroscience-driven development of a biomimetic neuroprosthetic device. The successful development of a somatosensory neuroprosthesis is based on three main pillars: (1) In-silico models of the biological sensory processing have to be exploited for emulating the natural neural activation of the nervous system to external tactile stimuli (blue segment); (2) animal proof of concept allows for experimental validation of the mechanisms behind the use of specific neurostimulation strategies defined with the use of modeling (orange segment); (3) A rigorous clinical validation of the biomimetic technology with implanted humans has to be performed in order to assess the functional outcomes in real-life scenarios (green segment). Credit: Nature Communications (2024). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-024-45190-6 A few years ago, a team of researchers working under Professor Stanisa Raspopovic at the ETH Zurich Neuroengineering Lab gained worldwide attention when they announced that their prosthetic legs had enabled amputees to feel sensations from this artificial body part for the first time.

Unlike commercial leg prostheses, which simply provide amputees with stability and support, the ETH researchers’ prosthetic device was connected to the sciatic nerve in the test subjects’ thigh via implanted electrodes.

This electrical connection enabled the neuroprosthesis to communicate with the patient’s brain, for example relaying information on the constant changes in pressure detected on the sole of the prosthetic foot when walking. This gave the test subjects greater confidence in their prosthesis—and it enabled them to walk considerably faster on challenging terrains.

“Our experimental leg prosthesis succeeded in evoking natural sensations. That’s something current neuroprostheses are mainly unable to do; instead, they mostly evoke artificial, unpleasant sensations,” Raspopovic says.

This is probably because today’s neuroprosthetics are using time-constant electrical pulses to stimulate the nervous system. “That’s not only unnatural, but also inefficient,” Raspopovic says.

In a recently published paper in Nature Communications , he and his team used the example of their leg prostheses to highlight the benefits of using naturally inspired, biomimetic stimulation to develop the next generation of neuroprosthetics. Model simulates activation of nerves in the sole

To generate these biomimetic signals, Natalija Katic—a doctoral student in Raspopovic’s research group—developed a computer model called FootSim. It is based on data collected by collaborators in Canada, who recorded the activity of natural receptors, named mechanoreceptors, in the sole of the foot while touching different points on the feet of volunteers with a vibrating rod.

The model simulates the dynamic behavior of large numbers of mechanoreceptors in the sole of the foot and generates the neural signals that shoot up the nerves in the leg towards the brain—from the moment the heel strikes the ground and the weight of the body starts to shift forward to the outside of the foot until the toes push off the ground ready for the next step.

“Thanks to this model, we can see how sensory receptors from the sole, and the connected nerves, behave during walking or running, which is experimentally impossible to measure,” Katic says. Information overload in the spinal cord

To assess how closely the biomimetic signals calculated by the model correspond to the signals emitted by real neurons, Giacomo Valle—a postdoc in Raspopovic’s research group—worked with colleagues in Germany, Serbia and Russia on experiments with cats, whose nervous system processes movement in a similar way to that of humans. The experiments took place in 2019 at the Pavlov Institute of Physiology in St. Petersburg and were carried out in accordance with the relevant European Union guidelines.

The researchers implanted electrodes, connecting some to the nerve in the leg and some to the spinal cord to discover how the signals are transmitted through the nervous system. When the researchers applied pressure to the bottom of the cat’s paw, thereby evoking the natural neural response that occurs when a cat takes a step, the peculiar pattern of activity recorded in the spinal cord did indeed resemble the patterns that were elicited in the spinal cord when the researchers stimulated the leg nerve with biomimetic signals.

By contrast, the conventional approach of time-constant stimulation of the sciatic nerve in the cat’s thigh elicited a markedly different pattern of activation in the spinal cord. “This clearly shows that the commonly used stimulation methods cause the neural networks in the spine to be flooded with information,” Valle says. “This information overload could be the reason for the unpleasant sensations or paraesthesia reported by some users of neuroprosthetics,” Raspopovic adds. Learning the language of the nervous system

In their clinical trial with leg amputees, the researchers were able to show that biomimetic stimulation is superior to time-constant stimulation. Their work clearly demonstrated how the signals that mimicked nature produced better results: not only were the test subjects able to climb steps faster, they also made fewer mistakes in a task that required them to climb the same steps while spelling words backwards.

“Biomimetic neurostimulation allows subjects to concentrate on other things while walking,” Raspopovic says, “so we concluded that this type of stimulation is more naturally processed and less taxing on the brain.”

Raspopovic, whose lab forms part of the ETH Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, believes that these new findings are not only relevant to the limb prostheses he and his team have been working on for over half a decade. He argues that the need to move away from unnatural, time-constant stimulation towards biomimetic signals also applies to a whole series of other aids and devices, including spinal implants and electrodes for brain stimulation.

“We need to learn the language of the nervous system,” Raspopovic says. “Then we’ll be able to communicate with the brain in ways it really understands.”

More information: Giacomo Valle et al, Biomimetic computer-to-brain communication enhancing naturalistic touch sensations via peripheral nerve stimulation, Nature Communications (2024). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-024-45190-6

Provided by ETH Zurich

Read more at medicalxpress.com

Study suggests how brain waves are part of memory

Study suggests how brain waves are part of memory

Representative image. Image Credit: ANI Spatial navigation and memory are essential components of our daily lives. Without these talents, we would struggle to navigate our surroundings and remember previous experiences. However, the neural foundation of spatial memory remains poorly known. A study group directed by Prof. Lukas Kunz, who just joined the University Hospital Bonn (UKB), has discovered fresh information on this knowledge gap. He discovered, along with scientists from New York and Freiburg, that different types of nerve cells become active simultaneously during spatial memory and are coordinated by brain waves (“ripples”). The findings have now been published in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

Associative memory allows different pieces of information are linked together. “In the context of spatial memory, associative memory enables us to remember the locations of certain objects in the spatial environment,” explains Prof. Kunz, research group leader for Cognitive and Translational Neuroscience at the Department of Epileptology at the UKB. He is also a member of the Transdisciplinary Research Area (TRA) “Life & Health” at the University of Bonn. “For example, we can remember where in the house we put our keys”. At older age or in certain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, however, this ability is limited. “It is therefore important to investigate the neuronal basis of different forms of human memory,” said Prof. Kunz. In the long term, this could help develop new therapies for memory impairments.

Nerve cells are active while information is retrieved from memory. To further investigate this phenomenon, the researchers recorded the activity of individual nerve cells in epilepsy patients performing a memory task. “In a virtual world, the participants were asked to remember the locations of different objects,” explains Prof. Kunz. The recordings showed that different types of nerve cells became active during this memory task. Some nerve cells responded to certain objects, while other nerve cells activated in response to certain locations. The scientists observed that interactions between the different types of nerve cells became stronger over time when participants remembered the right object in the right place.

In addition to place and object neurons, the researchers observed hippocampal brain waves (“ripples”) that also occurred during the memory task, presumably playing a crucial role in the formation and retrieval of associative memories. “Ripples could be important for the connection of different types of nerve cells and the formation of complex memories. It will be exciting to further investigate this idea in future studies,” explains Prof. Kunz. It will also be interesting to study how memory performance is modulated when ripples are suppressed or triggered, providing insights into the causal relevance of ripples. Prof. Kunz intends to continue the findings that he gained with his colleagues at Columbia University’s School of Engineering and Applied Science in New York and the University of Freiburg at the University Hospital Bonn.

“The department of epileptology at the UKB is well-known for its excellent brain research. The department has the unique opportunity to record the activity of individual nerve cells in the human brain in the video EEG monitoring unit, which is the heart of every epilepsy center. This provides exciting insights into the functioning of the human brain, which is only possible at a few research centers worldwide,” describes Prof. Kunz. In his interdisciplinary research, he builds on the close exchange with other researchers and medical doctors, which is essential for the development of new research ideas. (ANI)

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Read more at www.devdiscourse.com

Neuroscientist Shares Five Supplements To Improve Memory And Reduce Risk Of Alzheimer’s

Neuroscientist Shares Five Supplements To Improve Memory And Reduce Risk Of Alzheimer’s

In the quest for cognitive well-being, understanding the supplements that can genuinely make a difference is paramount. Neuroscientist Robert W.B. Love took to Instagram to shed light on five supplements that hold the potential to enhance memory and reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s. Let’s delve into the nuanced details of these scientifically-backed options, providing a robust foundation for fortifying brain health. Supplements To Improve Memory And Reduce Risk Of Alzheimer’s

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Robert W.B. Love (@robertwblove) Magnesium Threonate: A Potential Cognitive Booster

Magnesium L-threonate emerges as a promising cognitive booster, supported by studies demonstrating its ability to shield against brain cell death. Preliminary research conducted on zebrafish and mouse models underscores its efficacy in preserving cognitive function. Magnesium threonate not only shows promise in memory improvement but also in addressing nerve pain. This supplement offers a sneak peek into the evolving landscape of brain health supplements, hinting at potential breakthroughs in cognitive enhancement.

Also Read: 7 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts To Be Aware Of On World Alzheimer’s Day 2023 Ceylon Cinnamon: Cognitive Function and Alzheimer’s Risk Reduction

Beyond its culinary allure, Ceylon Cinnamon, also known as True Cinnamon, unfolds as a multifaceted ally in cognitive well-being. Recent research illuminates its impact on cognitive function, unveiling neuroprotective qualities. The spice’s properties extend to combating inflammation, fortifying the immune response, and reducing cancer risk through its antioxidant prowess. From disrupting oxidative stress to inhibiting tau protein accumulation, Ceylon Cinnamon emerges as a natural asset in the endeavour to reduce Alzheimer’s risk and preserve memory. Fish Oil: Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Brain Health

Derived from fatty fish, fish oil takes centre stage with its rich content of omega-3 fatty acids, specifically EPA and DHA, renowned for cardiovascular benefits. Expanding beyond its recognized role in heart health, fish oil showcases profound impacts on brain function, particularly in addressing mild memory loss and depression. Exploring its potential to enhance brain function in conditions like mild cognitive impairment opens a promising avenue for advancing cognitive well-being. In the realm of brain health supplements, fish oil emerges as a beacon of hope, offering potential life-changing discoveries for those grappling with cognitive challenges. Zinc: A Crucial Trace Element for Memory Formation

Zinc, a trace element, assumes a pivotal role in the creation of new neurons in the brain’s hippocampus, a cornerstone for memory formation. Adequate zinc levels play a protective role, supporting the synthesis of memories, emotions, and sensations. Disruptions in this intricate process can be mitigated with sufficient zinc levels, offering a safeguard against memory-related challenges and cognitive impairment. Beyond memory formation, zinc contributes to effective communication among brain cells, acting as a defender against the nebulous realm of cognitive challenges.

Also Read: Alzheimer’s Disease: Here’s How You Can Embrace Lifestyle Changes For Optimal Brain Health Lion’s Mane: A Nootropic for Cognitive Health

Lion’s Mane, categorized as a nootropic, unveils a trove of compounds that contribute to improved brain health and function. Notably, its impact on nerve growth factor levels positions it as a potential shield against disorders like Alzheimer’s. Scientific trials indicate its effectiveness in alleviating symptoms of mild cognitive impairment, presenting Lion’s Mane as a natural remedy for cognitive enhancement. As the understanding of cognitive health evolves, Lion’s Mane stands out as a fascinating avenue for those seeking a natural and research-backed approach to fortify cognitive resilience. Bottomline

In the ever-evolving landscape of neuroscience, these supplements offer a spartan yet compelling approach to memory improvement and Alzheimer’s risk reduction. Exploring these supplements, firmly grounded in scientific research, becomes a journey toward fortifying cognitive resilience and embracing a future where cognitive well-being takes centre stage.

Read more at www.onlymyhealth.com

Neuroscientist Shares Five Supplements To Improve Memory And Reduce Risk Of Alzheimer’s

Neuroscientist Shares Five Supplements To Improve Memory And Reduce Risk Of Alzheimer’s

In the quest for cognitive well-being, understanding the supplements that can genuinely make a difference is paramount. Neuroscientist Robert W.B. Love took to Instagram to shed light on five supplements that hold the potential to enhance memory and reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s. Let’s delve into the nuanced details of these scientifically-backed options, providing a robust foundation for fortifying brain health. Supplements To Improve Memory And Reduce Risk Of Alzheimer’s

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Robert W.B. Love (@robertwblove) Magnesium Threonate: A Potential Cognitive Booster

Magnesium L-threonate emerges as a promising cognitive booster, supported by studies demonstrating its ability to shield against brain cell death. Preliminary research conducted on zebrafish and mouse models underscores its efficacy in preserving cognitive function. Magnesium threonate not only shows promise in memory improvement but also in addressing nerve pain. This supplement offers a sneak peek into the evolving landscape of brain health supplements, hinting at potential breakthroughs in cognitive enhancement.

Also Read: 7 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts To Be Aware Of On World Alzheimer’s Day 2023 Ceylon Cinnamon: Cognitive Function and Alzheimer’s Risk Reduction

Beyond its culinary allure, Ceylon Cinnamon, also known as True Cinnamon, unfolds as a multifaceted ally in cognitive well-being. Recent research illuminates its impact on cognitive function, unveiling neuroprotective qualities. The spice’s properties extend to combating inflammation, fortifying the immune response, and reducing cancer risk through its antioxidant prowess. From disrupting oxidative stress to inhibiting tau protein accumulation, Ceylon Cinnamon emerges as a natural asset in the endeavour to reduce Alzheimer’s risk and preserve memory. Fish Oil: Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Brain Health

Derived from fatty fish, fish oil takes centre stage with its rich content of omega-3 fatty acids, specifically EPA and DHA, renowned for cardiovascular benefits. Expanding beyond its recognized role in heart health, fish oil showcases profound impacts on brain function, particularly in addressing mild memory loss and depression. Exploring its potential to enhance brain function in conditions like mild cognitive impairment opens a promising avenue for advancing cognitive well-being. In the realm of brain health supplements, fish oil emerges as a beacon of hope, offering potential life-changing discoveries for those grappling with cognitive challenges. Zinc: A Crucial Trace Element for Memory Formation

Zinc, a trace element, assumes a pivotal role in the creation of new neurons in the brain’s hippocampus, a cornerstone for memory formation. Adequate zinc levels play a protective role, supporting the synthesis of memories, emotions, and sensations. Disruptions in this intricate process can be mitigated with sufficient zinc levels, offering a safeguard against memory-related challenges and cognitive impairment. Beyond memory formation, zinc contributes to effective communication among brain cells, acting as a defender against the nebulous realm of cognitive challenges.

Also Read: Alzheimer’s Disease: Here’s How You Can Embrace Lifestyle Changes For Optimal Brain Health Lion’s Mane: A Nootropic for Cognitive Health

Lion’s Mane, categorized as a nootropic, unveils a trove of compounds that contribute to improved brain health and function. Notably, its impact on nerve growth factor levels positions it as a potential shield against disorders like Alzheimer’s. Scientific trials indicate its effectiveness in alleviating symptoms of mild cognitive impairment, presenting Lion’s Mane as a natural remedy for cognitive enhancement. As the understanding of cognitive health evolves, Lion’s Mane stands out as a fascinating avenue for those seeking a natural and research-backed approach to fortify cognitive resilience. Bottomline

In the ever-evolving landscape of neuroscience, these supplements offer a spartan yet compelling approach to memory improvement and Alzheimer’s risk reduction. Exploring these supplements, firmly grounded in scientific research, becomes a journey toward fortifying cognitive resilience and embracing a future where cognitive well-being takes centre stage.

Read more at www.onlymyhealth.com

The One Psychological Brain Tool That Can Create A More Positive Mindset, According To A Psychologist

The One Psychological Brain Tool That Can Create A More Positive Mindset, According To A Psychologist

The One Psychological Brain Trick That Can Create A More Positive Mindset, According To A Psychologist Our thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes shape our perception of the world and influence our experiences. While this may cause some to have an inherently negative perception of life, there’s an effective psychological brain tool that can help you perceive the world through a more positive lens. A brain training specialist took to TikTok to share one psychological brain trick that transformed her life.

Emilie Leyes , a hypnosis practitioner and podcast host of “How To Like Your Life,” posted a video on TikTok to share the one brain tool she incorporated into her life that helped her “stop [her] brain from thinking so negatively all the time” and adopt a more positive mindset.

Leyes explained how the human brain struggles with negativity bias , meaning we tend to focus more heavily on the impact of negative experiences rather than positive ones.

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“That used to support us back in early human evolution, but it just doesn’t anymore. It keeps us from enjoying the good things that do actually happen to us,” Leyes said.

Developed by Rick Hanson, Ph.D ., a neuropsychologist and best-selling author, we can rewire our minds to perceive the world with more optimism using a tool called installation, a mindfulness practice that encourages awareness and gratitude for all the positive things in our lives.

“It’s all about noticing the positive experiences that we actually have in our lives that normally pass us by because of this negativity bias, but then deliberately keeping your attention on it, and growing and amplifying the emotional experiences that you’re having within that good thing so that it can actually change your brain and have an impact on you,” Leyes expressed. Leyes explained there are three steps to learning how to appreciate the good in your life:

1. Notice the positive experiences throughout your day

Pay attention to the little joys that surround you in your day. Not every day will be a great one, but there is always something to be grateful for. These positive experiences could be noticing a dog riding in a car with his head out the window, hearing a funny story from a co-worker, discovering a new song that you love, or simply going for a walk outside.

RELATED: 10 Tiny Habits That Will Make You More Positive Than 98% Of People 2. Stay with the experience

Similarly to how we tend to let negative experiences affect our days, absorb the positive experiences instead! Allow yourself to sit with this positive encounter to intensify its impact.

“Turn up the volume on the good feelings that you’re experiencing,” Leyes suggested.

According to a webinar session with Dr. Hanson and Ruth Buczynski, Ph.D., “It takes around 30 seconds for an experience to really register in the brain, body, and mind, enough to have a lasting impact.” 3. Set an intention to allow this experience to make your day

After practicing the mindfulness of the first two steps, let yourself feel grateful for the positive experiences that left a mark on you. Let these experiences change you and lift your spirits.

Remember the smile you made seeing the joy of a furry friend having the time of his life on a car ride, hold on to the laughter you exchanged with your colleague, and let the powerful notes and lyrics of that great new song replay in your mind.

Life is hard enough on us— we don’t need to add to our stress by ignoring the daily positive experiences of our lives because the negative ones seem to hold more weight.

RELATED: How To Trick Your Brain Into Releasing Chemicals That Make You Happy There are other ways to reverse negativity bias and live a life rich in gratitude.

Katerina Barrata , a licensed associate counselor, shared some good news on TikTok about the reality of negativity bias . In her video, Barrata explained how research developed by Laura Carstensen , a professor of psychology at Stanford University, shows that negativity bias actually “declines, and even reverses, in old age.”

Additionally, you can train your mind to convert your inherently negative perspective to a positive one by simply “[contemplating] your own mortality.”

This method, also known as maranasati meditation in Buddhism , essentially conveys the impermanence of our lives and enforces the virtue of being present.

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Buddhists have practiced this meditation technique for thousands of years to “deepen their appreciation and gratitude for their precious human life.”

By recognizing the transience of our lives, we can learn to cultivate gratitude for every day we’re alive and get to experience the little joys and pleasures that are indubitably not so little. You decide how much power your daily experiences hold over you. The truth is, the obstacles and challenges that frequently cross our paths are inevitable, but we get to choose how these experiences affect us . Life is too short to spend worrying about all the problems we face throughout our lives.It’s important to understand this perspective doesn’t suggest avoiding or ignoring our problems, rather it offers useful tools to help us rise above our challenges and focus our attention on what truly matters — love, gratitude, and hope. RELATED: 7 Psychological Tricks To Help You Get Stuff Done — Even On Days You Don’t Feel Like It Francesca Duarte is a writer on YourTango’s news and entertainment team based in Orlando, FL. She covers lifestyle, human-interest, and spirituality topics.

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Are stressed-out brain cells the root cause of neurodegenerative disease?

Many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, are characterized by the accumulation of protein clumps, or aggregates, in the brain, which has led scientists to assume that the protein tangles kill brain cells. The search for treatments that break up and remove these tangled proteins has had little success, however.

But a new discovery by University of California, Berkeley, researchers suggests that the accumulation of aggregated proteins isn’t what kills brain cells. Rather, it’s the body’s failure to turn off these cells’ stress response.

In a study published online Jan. 31 in the journal Nature , the researchers reported that delivering a drug that forces the stress response to shut down saves cells that mimic a type of neurodegenerative disease known as early-onset dementia.

According to lead researcher Michael Rapé, the finding could offer clinicians another option for treatment for some neurodegenerative diseases, at least for those caused by mutations in the protein that switches off the cellular stress response. These include inherited diseases that lead to ataxia, or loss of muscle control, and early-onset dementia.

In addition, Rapé noted that other neurodegenerative diseases, including Mohr-Tranebjærg syndrome, childhood ataxia and Leigh syndrome, are also characterized by stress responses in overdrive and have symptoms similar to those of the early onset dementia mimicked in the new study.

“We always thought that protein clumps directly kill neurons, for example by puncturing membrane structures within these cells. Yet, we now found that aggregates prevent silencing of a stress response that cells originally mount to cope with bad proteins. The stress response is always on, and that’s what kills the cells,” said Rapé, head of the new division of molecular therapeutics in UC Berkeley’s Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. “We think that the same mechanisms may underlie more common pathologies that also show widespread aggregation, such as Alzheimer’s disease or frontotemporal dementia, but more work is needed to investigate the role of stress signaling in these diseases.”

Key to the discoveries by Rapé’s lab was the researchers’ finding that stress responses need to be turned off once a brain cell has successfully addressed a difficult situation. Rapé explained this finding to his son in simple terms: You not only need to clean up your room, but also turn out the light before going to bed. If you don’t turn off the light, you can’t fall asleep, but if you turn it off before you cleaned up your room, you would stumble if you had to get up in the dark.

Similarly, a cell has to clean up protein aggregates before turning off the stress response. If it doesn’t turn off the stress response, the cell will ultimately die.

“Aggregates don’t kill cells directly. They kill cells because they keep the light on,” he said. “But that means that you can treat these diseases, or at least the dozen or so neurodegenerative diseases that we found have kept their stress responses on. You treat them with an inhibitor that turns off the light. You don’t have to worry about completely getting rid of large aggregates, which changes how we think about treating neurodegenerative diseases. And most importantly, it makes this really doable.”

In their paper, Rapé and his colleagues describe a very large protein complex they discovered and called SIFI (SIlencing Factor of the Integrated stress response). This machine serves two purposes: It cleans up aggregates and, afterward, turns off the stress response triggered by the aggregated proteins. The stress response controlled by SIFI is switched on to deal with specific intracellular problems — the abnormal accumulation of proteins that end up at the wrong location in the cell. If components of SIFI are mutated, the cell will accumulate protein clumps and experience an active stress response. But it is the stress response signaling that kills the cells.

“The SIFI complex would normally clear out the aggregating proteins. When there are aggregates around, SIFI is diverted from the stress response, and the signaling continues. When aggregates have been cleared — the room has been cleaned up before bedtime — then the SIFI is not diverted away anymore, and it can turn off the stress response,” he said. “Aggregates kind of hijack that natural stress response-silencing mechanism, interfere with it, stall it. And so that’s why silencing never happens when you have aggregates, and that’s why cells die.”

A future treatment, Rapé said, would likely involve administration of a drug to turn off the stress response and a drug to keep SIFI turned on to clean up the aggregate mess.

Ubiquitin

Rapé, who is also the Dr. K. Peter Hirth Chair of Cancer Biology, studies the role of ubiquitin — a ubiquitous protein in the body that targets proteins for degradation — in regulating normal and disease processes in humans. In 2017, he discovered that a protein called UBR4 assembles a specific ubiquitin signal that was required for the elimination of proteins that tend to aggregate inside cells.

Only later did other researchers find that mutations in UBR4 are found in some inherited types of neurodegeneration. This discovery led Rapé to team up with colleagues at Stanford University to find out how UBR4 causes these diseases.

“This was a unique opportunity: We had an enzyme that makes an anti-aggregation signal, and when it’s mutated, it causes aggregation disease,” he said. “You put these two things together and you can say, ‘If you figure out how this UBR4 allows sustained cell survival, that probably tells you how aggregates kill cells.'”

They found that UBR4 is actually part of a much larger protein complex, which Rapé dubbed SIFI, and they found that this SIFI machinery was needed when a cell couldn’t sort proteins into its mitochondria. Such proteins that end up at the wrong location in cells tend to clump and, in turn, cause neurodegeneration.

“Surprisingly, though, we found that the core substrates of the SIFI complex were two proteins, one of which senses when proteins don’t make it into mitochondria. That protein detects that something is wrong, and it then activates […]

Read more at www.sciencedaily.com

LOCKDOWNS KILL: Study reveals social isolation can increase inflammation in the body

LOCKDOWNS KILL: Study reveals social isolation can increase inflammation in the body

According to a study, spending too much time on your own can increase inflammation in the body . Details of the study were published in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity.

The research team warned that being excessively solitary may impact both your mental health and your physical health. This highlights the often-forgotten importance of balancing your digital connections and the need for genuine human interaction.

The researchers conducting the study focused on “the impact of social isolation during early adulthood and midlife .” The results showed that there was a strong correlation between loneliness and inflammation markers.

The research team also said it was worth noting how childhood isolation was closely linked to higher soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) levels, a marker of chronic inflammation.

They added that this association persisted into adulthood, highlighting the long-lasting effect of early-life social experiences on inflammatory responses.

The research used diverse data sources to support their findings, such as data from the TRIAGE Danish study, a longitudinal study conducted in New Zealand and a comprehensive British twin analysis. The combined findings consistently stressed the crucial role of social isolation in influencing inflammation levels, as specifically evidenced by suPAR.

Overall, the study shows the negative consequences of social isolation , especially when living alone, because it contributes to elevated suPAR levels, signaling chronic inflammation.

This link also proved robust across various demographic groups, suggesting that social experiences may have a lasting influence on the body’s inflammatory responses over time. (Related: Thai black ginger found to delay arthritis progression and suppress inflammation .) Avoid social isolation by fostering healthy relationships and caring for your overall well-being

You may find yourself spending a lot of time on your devices and social media in today’s modern world.

If you are worried about your physical and mental health, follow these tips to improve your social connections and create a sense of community.

They can also help prevent social isolation linked to inflammation:

Join group activities

If you have different hobbies but no one to share them with, look for group activities or classes in your neighborhood.

Joining these groups will help you share your love for your interests, like a book club or gym class.

Volunteer in your community

Volunteering doesn’t just help you feel like part of your community, it also gives you a chance to contribute to a greater cause as you connect with others who share your passion for making a positive impact.

Volunteering at the local animal shelter or soup kitchen is a fulfilling way to build a sense of community.

Attend local events

Instead of mindlessly scrolling social media while you’re in bed, go outside and explore different events in your local community.

In your free time, attend gatherings, workshops, or cultural events to meet new people and expand your social circle.

Stay connected with loved ones

Don’t spend all day at work or binge-watching TV.

Regularly reach out to your family and friends. If they’re too far away to visit, call them on the phone, video chat, or send a handwritten letter to help maintain strong connections.

Use digital platforms mindfully

Leverage social media to stay connected with friends and family.

Just make sure you’re always mindful of screen time. It’s also better to prioritize in-person or meaningful virtual interactions to strengthen your relationships. Practice active listening Talking to family and friends won’t do you any good if you have poor active listening skills.When engaging in conversations, practice active listening. You can do this by showing genuine interest in a friend’s stories and experiences. Adopt a pet Pets can help improve your physical and mental health, especially since they provide companionship and love.If you are physically able to care for a pet, adopt a dog . They’re great companions because many dog breeds are active and require regular physical activity, which is also good for you if you’re feeling low.You can also meet new people by walking your dog to the nearest park.Keep in mind that fighting social isolation is an ongoing process that requires your continued efforts to nurture connections and create a supportive social environment. Maintain healthy habits and care for both your physical and mental health to prevent inflammation linked to many health issues.Visit Mental.news for more stories about how loneliness and social isolation can affect your mental health and overall well-beingWatch the video below to learn how turmeric can help with inflammation .This video is from the All About Herbs channel on Brighteon.com . More related stories: Chinese medicinal herb astragalus found to reduce inflammation and improve immunity in heart attack patients. Loneliness increases risk of PREMATURE DEATH by nearly 30%, declared an EPIDEMIC by surgeon general. Study shows EXTRA VIRGIN COCONUT OIL can promote weight loss, reduce body fat and improve liver health. Anti-inflammatory superfoods: Fight inflammation with this creamy broccoli soup recipe. Sources include: NaturalHealth365.com ScienceDirect.com HealthDirect.gov.au Brighteon.com

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