Eleuthero (Siberian Ginseng) Root Dosage & Side Effects

Eleuthero is an eastern adaptogen that helps your body fight off a cold. It’s also packed with bioactive compounds. Unsure about its safety and the dosage you should use? Read on for our evidence-based guide. What is Eleuthero?

Also known as Siberian ginseng , eleuthero is an herb with the scientific names Eleutherococcus senticosus or Acanthopanax senticosus . Around the world, it may also be called Ciwujia, Shigoka, Goka, Ezoukogi, or Kan Jang (when combined with green chiretta). It is a staple of traditional medicine in the Far East, especially in China, Korea, and eastern Russia [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 ].

According to these traditions, eleuthero is an adaptogen: a substance that keeps the body functioning normally under stress [ 7 ].

Eleuthero belongs to the same plant family as Asian and American ginseng ( Araliaceae ). However, Asian and American ginseng both belong to a different genus further up the botanical tree called Panax , while eleuthero belongs to Eleutherococcus . Being a distant cousin of these other ginsengs, eleuthero contains a different set of bioactive compounds [ 8 ].

Eleuthero is a flowering shrub. Its root, bark, leaves, and berries all contain bioactive compounds that may have positive health effects [ 9 , 10 ].

Eleuthero or Siberian ginseng is an East Asian herb with a history of use as an adaptogen. It shouldn’t be confused with American and Asian ginseng, which are entirely different plants. Components

The roots, berries, and leaves of eleuthero each contain multiple bioactive compounds . The specific compounds in each part of the plant may be different, and so their health benefits may also vary. Most studies on the health benefits of eleuthero focus on the root and bark [ 10 ].

Eleuthero berries contain high levels of antioxidants and potential cancer-fighting compounds ; they are also high in important minerals like potassium , calcium , and magnesium . These berries have long been added to fermented wines in China and Russia [ 9 ]. Eleutherosides

The most important bioactive compounds in eleuthero belong to a chemical family called eleutherosides; these are eleutherosides A through E. Of these, the ones with the greatest effect are eleutherosides B (syringin) and E [ 11 ].

These two compounds are being investigated for anticancer and anti-diabetic effects [ 11 ]. Sesamin

Sesamin is an active compound that was first discovered in sesame seeds. Sesamin from eleuthero may help protect nerve and brain cells from damage . Sesamin may also improve liver function and reduce cholesterol [ 12 , 13 ]. Isofraxidin

Researchers isolated isofraxidin from eleuthero bark and consider it may have the potential to fight liver cancer [ 14 ]. Oleanolic Acid

Oleanolic acid is a common compound that is found in many plants, including eleuthero. This compound is a strong antioxidant that may also fight inflammation and improve liver function [ 15 , 16 ]. Ursolic Acid

Ursolic acid is found in many different plants, including eleuthero. It can be taken as a supplement and is reported to decrease inflammation , fight cancer , prevent diabetes , protect the heart , and lower cholesterol . Researchers are currently investigating their anticancer effects [ 17 , 18 , 19 ].

Eleuthero is packed with bioactive compounds like eleutherosides in the roots and antioxidants and minerals in the berries. Possible Mechanisms of Eleuthero

Eleuthero’s mechanism of action is complex because it contains an abundance of active compounds. Each compound may have unique effects, and these effects may add up or counteract each other. AMPK Activation

Eleutherosides may activate AMPK , an important “switch” in energy metabolism. AMPK reduces fat storage and increases insulin sensitivity . Through AMPK, eleutherosides may be able to restore insulin signaling in people with diabetes [ 20 , 6 , 21 , 22 ]. Heat Shock Protein Activation

Eleuthero may increase heat shock proteins like HSP70 and HSP72. This could help explain its ability to reverse the effects of stress: heat shock proteins protect cells and keep them alive in conditions that would otherwise damage or kill them [ 23 , 24 ].

Eleuthero extract increases catecholamines (especially dopamine and norepinephrine ) in the parts of the brain responsible for managing stress. The exact way it influences their levels and activity is unknown, but this mechanism may underlie eleuthero’s mental health benefits [ 25 , 26 , 27 ]. BDNF Activation

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF , is a protein active in the hippocampus of the brain. It helps nervous tissue grow and reorganize itself , and it protects the brain from damage . Low BDNF is linked to depression and anxiety . Eleuthero increases BDNF in the hippocampus, which could explain its reputation as a brain-boosting supplement [ 28 , 29 ].

Research connecting eleuthero and BDNF is extremely new . Only two studies have ever tested these effects – one cell study in 2013 and one rat study in 2018 – and while both have shown promising benefits, we cannot yet say that eleuthero will activate BDNF in humans [ 28 , 29 ]. Sirtuin 3 Activation

Sesamin activates a protein called sirtuin 3, or SIRT3 , which regulates energy metabolism and prevents cell death. Through SIRT3, sesamin may protect tissues from inflammation and death after an injury [ 30 , 31 , 32 ].

Scientists hypothesize that eleuthero may activate brain-protective BDNF and energy-boosting AMPK and SIRT3, but this hasn’t been proven. Eleuthero Safety & Side Effects

Overall, eleuthero is generally regarded as safe .

In mice, it takes an extremely high dose to cause death (over 25 g per kg of body weight). If translated to humans, an average adult would have to eat more than 1.5 kg of dry root for it to be dangerous [ 33 ].

Eleuthero has few side effects. Rarely, people taking eleuthero in combination with other herbal supplements may experience sleepiness , cold extremities , increased blood pressure , increased heart […]

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Eleuthero (Siberian Ginseng) Root Dosage & Side Effects

Eleuthero is an eastern adaptogen that helps your body fight off a cold. It’s also packed with bioactive compounds. Unsure about its safety and the dosage you should use? Read on for our evidence-based guide. What is Eleuthero?

Also known as Siberian ginseng , eleuthero is an herb with the scientific names Eleutherococcus senticosus or Acanthopanax senticosus . Around the world, it may also be called Ciwujia, Shigoka, Goka, Ezoukogi, or Kan Jang (when combined with green chiretta). It is a staple of traditional medicine in the Far East, especially in China, Korea, and eastern Russia [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 ].

According to these traditions, eleuthero is an adaptogen: a substance that keeps the body functioning normally under stress [ 7 ].

Eleuthero belongs to the same plant family as Asian and American ginseng ( Araliaceae ). However, Asian and American ginseng both belong to a different genus further up the botanical tree called Panax , while eleuthero belongs to Eleutherococcus . Being a distant cousin of these other ginsengs, eleuthero contains a different set of bioactive compounds [ 8 ].

Eleuthero is a flowering shrub. Its root, bark, leaves, and berries all contain bioactive compounds that may have positive health effects [ 9 , 10 ].

Eleuthero or Siberian ginseng is an East Asian herb with a history of use as an adaptogen. It shouldn’t be confused with American and Asian ginseng, which are entirely different plants. Components

The roots, berries, and leaves of eleuthero each contain multiple bioactive compounds . The specific compounds in each part of the plant may be different, and so their health benefits may also vary. Most studies on the health benefits of eleuthero focus on the root and bark [ 10 ].

Eleuthero berries contain high levels of antioxidants and potential cancer-fighting compounds ; they are also high in important minerals like potassium , calcium , and magnesium . These berries have long been added to fermented wines in China and Russia [ 9 ]. Eleutherosides

The most important bioactive compounds in eleuthero belong to a chemical family called eleutherosides; these are eleutherosides A through E. Of these, the ones with the greatest effect are eleutherosides B (syringin) and E [ 11 ].

These two compounds are being investigated for anticancer and anti-diabetic effects [ 11 ]. Sesamin

Sesamin is an active compound that was first discovered in sesame seeds. Sesamin from eleuthero may help protect nerve and brain cells from damage . Sesamin may also improve liver function and reduce cholesterol [ 12 , 13 ]. Isofraxidin

Researchers isolated isofraxidin from eleuthero bark and consider it may have the potential to fight liver cancer [ 14 ]. Oleanolic Acid

Oleanolic acid is a common compound that is found in many plants, including eleuthero. This compound is a strong antioxidant that may also fight inflammation and improve liver function [ 15 , 16 ]. Ursolic Acid

Ursolic acid is found in many different plants, including eleuthero. It can be taken as a supplement and is reported to decrease inflammation , fight cancer , prevent diabetes , protect the heart , and lower cholesterol . Researchers are currently investigating their anticancer effects [ 17 , 18 , 19 ].

Eleuthero is packed with bioactive compounds like eleutherosides in the roots and antioxidants and minerals in the berries. Possible Mechanisms of Eleuthero

Eleuthero’s mechanism of action is complex because it contains an abundance of active compounds. Each compound may have unique effects, and these effects may add up or counteract each other. AMPK Activation

Eleutherosides may activate AMPK , an important “switch” in energy metabolism. AMPK reduces fat storage and increases insulin sensitivity . Through AMPK, eleutherosides may be able to restore insulin signaling in people with diabetes [ 20 , 6 , 21 , 22 ]. Heat Shock Protein Activation

Eleuthero may increase heat shock proteins like HSP70 and HSP72. This could help explain its ability to reverse the effects of stress: heat shock proteins protect cells and keep them alive in conditions that would otherwise damage or kill them [ 23 , 24 ]. Neurotransmitters

Eleuthero extract increases catecholamines (especially dopamine and norepinephrine ) in the parts of the brain responsible for managing stress. The exact way it influences their levels and activity is unknown, but this mechanism may underlie eleuthero’s mental health benefits [ 25 , 26 , 27 ]. BDNF Activation

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF , is a protein active in the hippocampus of the brain. It helps nervous tissue grow and reorganize itself , and it protects the brain from damage . Low BDNF is linked to depression and anxiety . Eleuthero increases BDNF in the hippocampus, which could explain its reputation as a brain-boosting supplement [ 28 , 29 ].

Research connecting eleuthero and BDNF is extremely new . Only two studies have ever tested these effects – one cell study in 2013 and one rat study in 2018 – and while both have shown promising benefits, we cannot yet say that eleuthero will activate BDNF in humans [ 28 , 29 ]. Sirtuin 3 Activation

Sesamin activates a protein called sirtuin 3, or SIRT3 , which regulates energy metabolism and prevents cell death. Through SIRT3, sesamin may protect tissues from inflammation and death after an injury [ 30 , 31 , 32 ].

Scientists hypothesize that eleuthero may activate brain-protective BDNF and energy-boosting AMPK and SIRT3, but this hasn’t been proven. Eleuthero Safety & Side Effects

Overall, eleuthero is generally regarded as safe .

In mice, it takes an extremely high dose to cause death (over 25 g per kg of body weight). If translated to humans, an average adult would have to eat more than 1.5 kg of dry root for it to be dangerous [ 33 ].

Eleuthero has few side effects. Rarely, people taking eleuthero in combination with other herbal supplements may experience sleepiness , cold extremities , increased blood pressure […]

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