Healthy food trends for 2020

Healthy food trends for 2020



In getting a fit and healthy body, diet is everything. One cannot achieve optimum health without considering the importance of nutrition. One’s health mostly depends on what you feed your body and, to start your health plans right, here are the lists of healthy food trends predicted by Frances Largeman-Roth, RDN, published in www.today.com and Khristine Thomason published in Womenshealthmag.com. Even more plant-based protein

TWENTY-NINETEEN saw more plant-based options than ever before, especially when it came to protein sources. And that train isn’t slowing down any time soon. “They’ve always been around, but as people become more conscious about the sourcing of foods, plant-based proteins will likely gain more momentum in 2020,” said Laura Iu, RD.

The Whole Foods 2020 Trend Report touts mung bean, hempseed, pumpkin, avocado, watermelon seed, and golden chlorella as protein sources to look out for in the New Year, as they offer a spectrum of plant-based amino acids.

“Overall, consumers have been encouraged to consume less red meat and food companies/restaurants are responding,” said Keri Gans, RD. “Perhaps, more ‘hot dogs’ and ‘chicken tenders’ will be next!” Plant-based, but not plant-exclusive

While there’s definitely an influx of vegan options hitting the shelves, there will likely be an increased focus on plant-based eating for omnivores and flexitarians in 2020.

There will likely be more hybrid products that incorporate veggies in 2020. For example, Whole Foods’ 2020 Trend Report notes that some brands are creating their meat products with 25 percent to 30 percent vegetables. A new era of mocktails

While “Dry January” is a popular way to start the year on a healthier note, more and more people are jumping on the booze-free train year-round these days. “Millennials and Gen Z are drinking less in general,” said Moon. “It was only a matter of time before someone came up with a creative solution. Enter “zero-proof” drinks.”

More and more brands are introducing alcohol-free spirits, wines and beers. Plus, countless restaurants and bars around the country are including mocktails on their menus, and there are even some nonalcoholic bars opening up across the country, according to Yelp’s 2020 Trend Forecast Report. You’ll learn the term nootropics

“As of 2020, we’re just one short decade away from every baby boomer being retirement age, making 1 in 5 Americans 65 years or older,” said Moon. As a result, “people are increasingly concerned about brain health and staying sharp.” That’s where ’nootropics’ may be able to help.

Nootropics are compounds that help improve brain function, including memory and cognitive function. They come in supplement or drug form, but there are also a number of nootropic foods that boost cognitive health, like turmeric, wild blueberries, salmon, broccoli, walnuts, egg yolks and seaweed.

Plant-based eating is a big trend for 2020. More non-dairy milk alternatives

TWENTY-NINETEEN was certainly the year of oat milk—you can now find the vegan-friendly beverage in supermarkets and coffee shops across the country. And with so much of the population switching to a vegan or plant-based diet, the need for alternative milk won’t slow any time soon Goodbye flour, hello veggies

According to the Grubhub’s “Taste of 2019” report, cauliflower pizza was the most ordered food of the year. That’s not surprising considering the breadth of cauli products on the market, and Gans predicts you’re going to see a lot more flour options in 2020. “From chickpea flour and almond flour to sorghum flour, I think more food companies will be baking with these nutrient dense flours versus basic white flour,” she says. The Whole Foods Trend Report also suspects there will be more packaged products going alt-flour as well—think: tigernut flour in chips and snack foods, and pastries made with seed flour blends. Fresh snacks>packaged

While the word “snack” may seem synonymous with processed pretzels and chips, Sonya Angelone, RD, predicts there will be a lot more healthy snacking choices in the New Year. Particularly, snacks you store in your fridge. The Whole Foods 2020 Trend Report similarly notes, “The refrigerated section is filling up with the kind of wholesome, fresh snacks typically prepared and portioned in advance at home: hard-boiled eggs with savory toppings, pickled vegetables, drinkable soups, and dippers of all kinds, all perfectly portioned and in convenient single-serve packaging.” That extends to protein bars, too, like the brand Perfect Bar which contains a number of fruits and veggies and, therefore, requires refrigeration. CBD is here to stay

A year ago, CBD may not have even been on your radar. Now, it’s in skin care, muscle-soothing lotion and even clothing. CBD has certainly made an impact on the food world. Products include candy, seltzers, gum and even coffee. Spotlight on truly natural sweeteners

According to the International Food Information Council, the No. 1 thing Americans are doing to eat healthier is limiting sugar intake but the National Institutes of Health shows while Americans have cut back, they are still getting way too many added sugars from foods like white bread and pasta, sodas and pastries.”

The Whole Foods 2020 Report predicts that brands will likely launch more “syrupy reductions from fruit sources like monk fruit, pomegranates, coconut, and dates” to add flavor to desserts, meat glazes and marinades. Carbs are back…sort of

There’s no denying 2019 has been very anti-carbs (looking at you, keto diet).

Make no mistake, keto will likely still linger in 2020, but Moon predicts people will be a bit more accepting of healthy carb choices. Carbs from healthy whole grains, pulses, starchy vegetables and fruit are amazing. Sweet potato is the new cauliflower

Sweet potatoes are rich in fiber and packed with nutrients like vitamin A and vitamin C. This nutritious tuber has long been a staple at holiday meals but it’s about to get the cauliflower treatment. Fish is going faux

Tuna looks like canned tuna but it’s actually made from soy protein and other flavorings.

If 2019 was the year of the Impossible Burger, 2020 may just be the year of plant-based fish.

Eating seafood is touted by most […]

Read more at businessmirror.com.ph

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